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Course Descriptions

Accounting Course Descriptions

  • ACCT 2301 Principles of Financial Accounting.

    A study of the basic accounting concepts and procedures underlying the organization and reporting of financial information. Topics include the accounting cycle, the preparation of financial statements, the measurement and reporting of business income, and the valuation and presentation of assets and current liabilities. Emphasis is placed on the relevance of the business and economic information generated by the accounting process and how it is used in personal and business decision making. Prerequisite: 18 semester credit hours of college credit. Students who plan to take ACCT 3313 must earn a minimum grade of C in ACCT 2301. Credit 3.

  • ACCT 2302 Principles of Managerial Accounting.

    A continuation of financial accounting topics followed by an introduction to managerial accounting. Topics include corporate accounting issues, bonds, statement of cash flows, financial statement analysis, job costing, cost behavior, cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting, performance evaluation, product pricing and capital budgeting. Emphasis is placed on the usage of accounting information in managerial decision making. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301. Students who plan to take ACCT 3313 must earn a minimum grade of C in ACCT 2302. Credit 3.

  • ACCT 3304 Managerial Accounting.

    Further development of financial accounting concepts, interpretation, and the study of management uses of accounting data. This course includes a study of basic accounting concepts, interpretation of accounting reports, cost control and analysis, and methods of measuring performance. Not open to Accounting majors or minors. Prerequisite: ACCT 2302. Credit 3.

  • ACCT 3313 Intermediate Accounting I.

    A thorough study of the accounting principles underlying the preparation of financial statements. This course is concerned primarily with the recording process, formats of the financial statements, and the measurement and reporting of current and non-current assets and related revenues and expenses. The environment of accounting, basic accounting theory, and time value of money concepts are emphasized. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302 with a minimum grade of C in each. Credit 3.

  • ACCT 3314 Intermediate Accounting II.

    A continuation of ACCT 3313, this course extends the study of the preparation of financial statements to the measurement and reporting of current and long term liabilities, stockholders’ equity and investments. Additional topics include cash flow statements, accounting for pensions, leases, and income taxes. Prerequisite: ACCT 3313 with a minimum grade of C. Credit 3.

  • ACCT 3324 Principles of Accounting Systems Designs.

    A study of principles of accounting systems design integrated into both manual and computerized systems. Also includes emphasis on the accounting cycle, internal control structures, computerized transaction processing systems, relational databases, and integrated enterprise resource planning systems in accounting. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302. Credit 3.

  • ACCT 3340 International Accounting.

    An introduction to the accounting aspects of international business. Topics covered from an international perspective include the interaction between accounting and its environment, differing national accounting practices, international harmonization of accounting and reporting, foreign currency translation and exchange rate issues, problems of inflation, transfer pricing and taxation, managerial accounting and analysis of foreign financial statements. Prerequisite: ACCT 2302. Credit 3.

  • ACCT 3347 Cost Accounting.

    A study of cost accounting principles and techniques of assembling data for product costing and for managerial use in planning and control and decision making. Cost terminology, cost behavior, job order and process costing, budgeting, cost-volume-profit analysis, standard costs, and activity based costing are topics covered. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302 with a minimum grade of C in each. Credit 3.

  • ACCT 3353 Income Tax Accounting.

    A study of basic tax concepts and income taxation of individuals. Emphasis is placed on the determination of income and statutory deductions in order to arrive at the net taxable income. Consideration is given to tax planning as well as decision-making and tax return problems. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302 with a minimum grade of C in each. Credit 3.

  • ACCT 4315 Advanced Accounting I.

    A study of various special reporting topics in financial accounting, this course surveys financial statement presentation and disclosure requirements for special areas of income recognition and accounting changes, dilutive securities, earnings per share calculations, reporting for business segments and interim periods, and accounting and reporting standards for partnerships and governmental and not-for-profit entities. Prerequisite: ACCT 3314 with a minimum grade of C. Credit 3.

  • ACCT 4316 Advanced Accounting II.

    A study of the financial accounting standards and procedures used in accounting and reporting for business combinations and intercorporate investments, consolidated financial statements, and multinational enterprises, including foreign currency transactions and financial instruments and translation of foreign entity statements. Prerequisite: ACCT 3314 with a minimum grade of C. Credit 3.

  • ACCT 4363 Fraud Examination.

    An examination of fraud within organizations with an emphasis on its detection and prevention. This course examines the nature and causes of financial and occupational fraud, ways to prevent and deter fraudulent conduct, and procedures for uncovering and investigating fraud. Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

  • ACCT 4360 Oil and Gas Accounting.

    An introduction to oil and gas accounting. Emphasizes accounting for costs incurred in the acquisition, exploration, development, and production of oil and natural gas using successful efforts, full cost, and tax accounting methods. Also introduces students to joint interest accounting, gas pipeline accounting, the required disclosures for oil and gas activities, and analysis of oil and gas companies’ financial statements. Prerequisite: ACCT 3313. Credit 3.

  • ACCT 4372 Auditing Principles.

    An introduction to auditing concepts and procedures. Emphasizes generally accepted auditing standards; professional responsibilities; the nature, acquisition, evaluation, and documentation of audit evidence; internal control; and the auditor’s reports. Prerequisite: ACCT 3324 and ACCT 3314 with a minimum grade of C in each. Credit 3.

  • ACCT 4380 Studies In Accounting.

    Individual study as arranged with members of the faculty. This course may be repeated and may be taken for Academic Distinction Program Credit. Prerequisite: Consent of Department Chair. Credit 1, 2, or 3.

  • ACCT 4389 Internship in Accounting.

    This course provides students with an internship experience allowing the application of accounting and auditing skills in an actual work setting. Students will work full-time in public or industry accounting paid positions for a minimum of 150 hours. Students generally will work full-time for one-half of the semester and attend accelerated accounting courses during the remaining half. Prerequisites: Junior standing, ACCT 3314, ACCT 3324, permission of the Department Chair of Accounting, and selection by an employing firm. For Spring semester internships, should be taken concurrently with ACCT 4316 and ACCT 4372. Credit 3.

Agriculture Course Descriptions

    • AGRI 1131 Introduction to Professional Leadership Skills.

      An exploration of the career options available to professionals in agricultural sciences, education, and business. Specific requirements for the various professions are discussed by a series of guest speakers. Course is intended for beginning students. Credit 1.

    • AGRI 1309 Computers in Agriculture.

      This course is designed to acquaint students with software applications useful to agriculture and how various technological advances are applied in modern agricultural enterprises. Credit 3.

    • Topics in Agriculture

      This course will examine special topics/issues in agriculture at an introductory level. Topics may be offered in: Agriculture, Animal Science, Agricultural Business, Horticulture and Crop Science, and Agricultural Engineering Technology. This course may be repeated up to three times as topics and subject matter changes. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3360 Communication Skills for Agriculturists.

      Provides an overview of information systems, principles and procedures used in communicating agricultural news and information in various agricultural professions. Emphasis is placed on effective written and oral communication means in professional and media environments in addition to public relations efforts in the fields of agricultural education and agribusiness. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: ENGL 1302. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4100 Applied Agricultural Technology.

      Arranged developmental learning experiences incorporating an application of agricultural skills and practices in an emphasis area of the student’s choice. Individual study plans are devised by faculty to provide the student with broad-based knowledge. Credit 1.

    • AGRI 4120 Professional Career Skills.

      A review of current careers in agriculture with emphasis on professional and managerial opportunities. Includes preparation of résumé, interview skills and other means of professional communication. Credit 1.

    • AGRI 4350 Agricultural Biosecurity.

      The purpose of this course is to study the potential spread and prevalence of contagious organisms, reproductive diseases and contaminants in the agriculture, food, fiber and natural resource industries. Concepts dealing with isolation, resistance, sanitation, containment, transportation, and food safety issues and potential economic impact to the agricultural industry and others are major topics. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4364 International Agriculture.

      An overview of international trade issues and political and economic influences on world food and fiber production and distribution systems. When offered abroad, students will have the opportunity to visit agricultural production, processing, and transport facilities. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4369 Special Topics in Agriculture.

      Individual study in specialized areas of Agricultural Science. To be directed and approved by the Agricultural Science advisor. This course is designed to be a multi-topic course. The student can take the course under various special topics being offered. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4388 Principles of Agricultural Leadership and Community Development.

      Involves the study of the characteristics of agricultural leaders, leadership theory, parliamentary procedure, personal development, and organizational structure. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4396 Directed Studies.

      Arranged professional and developmental learning experiences incorporating a practical application of agricultural skills and practices. To include internships, individual research and industry studies. Writing enhanced. Credit 1-6.

Agricultural Business

    • AGRI 2317 Principles of Agricultural Economics.

      This course introduces concepts such as economics, supply and demand analysis, cost of production and market price risk; all related to practical application to agriculture. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 2385 Analysis of the Agricultural Sector.

      This course provides an overview of the various sectors and institutions servicing agriculture. Focus is on the marketing efforts and added value that each sector provides to farm products. The course emphasizes the structure of each area, and the trends that shape their activities. An introduction to marketing activities with emphasis on agricultural commodities is also provided. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 2389 Agribusiness Financial Analysis.

      Introduction to financial management for agricultural enterprises. Topics include: depreciation, balance sheet, income and expense, production records, income tax principles, enterprise budgeting, partial budgeting, cash flow budgeting, and analysis and interpretation of farm records. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3350 Agribusiness for Agriculture Science Teachers.

      This course is designed to present agribusiness concepts that are included in the curriculum of post-secondary schools of Texas. Subjects include budgeting, finance, insurance, organization and management, marketing and government policies. Prerequisite: AGRI 2317. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3367 Agricultural Finance.

      Advanced agribusiness management applications of borrowed capital to operations; methods of determining loan needs for farmers; budgeting incomes to facilitate repayment of loans; cost of using borrowed capital; management of financial resources in agribusiness; and time value of money applications. Prerequisite: AGRI 2389. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3377 Farm and Ranch Management.

      Focus on planning for the most efficient resource allocation in agricultural operations. This course uses previously taught financial management practices and applies that to an agricultural industry case study. Prerequisite: AGRI 3367 or FINC 3320. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3385 Quantiative Methods for Agribusiness.

      This course presents analysis tools from the fields of economics, statistics, and management as they relate to agricultural business decision making. The analytical and quantitative principles are applied to a variety of agricultural business situations. Topics include forecasting, decision analysis, and linear programming. Computer-based methods are emphasized. Prerequisite: STAT 1369 or MATH 1369 and MATH 1324. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4340 Agribusiness Marketing.

      A study of the major marketing strategies and decisions that must be made by agribusiness firms, including target market selection, marketing research, sales forecasting, product policies, distribution channels, pricing, advertising, and market control. The development of a strategic marketing plan for an agribusiness firm will be required. Writing enhanced. Prerequisites: AGRI 2317 and AGRI 2385. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4361 Agribusiness Organization and Management.

      Management principles relevant to agribusiness firms: marketing management, e-commerce and value-added agriculture, managerial concepts, human resource management, and business organizations. Writing enhanced. Prerequisites: AGRI 2317 and AGRI 2389. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4362 Natural Resource Economics.

    • AGRI 4363 Legal Issues in Agribusiness.

      This course will examine legal concepts and practical legal problems facing rural residents, farmers, agribusiness and local government. Taught from a "preventive” perspective, students will acquire legal awareness necessary to become an effective and analytical agribusiness decision maker. Legal issues will include statutes, common law (cases), customs, and business and administrative regulations. Prerequisites: AGRI 2317. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4365 Agricultural Sales and Consulting.

      This course presents the principles of professional sales techniques used by food and agricultural firms. Necessary skills required in the agribusiness industry such as interpersonal skills, sales techniques, and sales forecasting skills are developed and enhanced. Prerequisites: AGRI 2317 and AGRI 2385. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4374 Agricultural Market Analysis and Prices.

      Principles of agricultural market analysis to include: price analysis, price forecasting, forward contracting, futures market, market structure analysis, marketing and sales management. Writing enhanced. Prerequisites: AGRI 2317 and AGRI 3385. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4375 Advanced Agribusiness Management.

      This course serves as a capstone course for agribusiness majors. Contemporary issues related to agribusiness are approached using information systems, industry representatives, field trips, and class presentations. Prerequisites: AGRI 3367 and AGRI 4361. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4386 Agriculture and Government Programs.

      This course examines and analyzes the effects of government participation on farmers, ranchers, agribusiness firms and consumers. Topics include the policy making process and the analysis of commodities, conservation, food safety, international trade, rural development programs, and the interrelationship of agriculture and agribusiness. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: AGRI 2317. Credit 3.


Agricultural Education

    • AGRI 3320 Interdisciplinary Agricultural Science and Technology.

      This course is designed to develop competencies of agricultural science teachers to teach essential elements in agricultural business, agricultural mechanization, animal science, and horticulture and crop science. Credit 3.

    • AGED 4364 Methods of Teaching Agricultural Science.

      A study of the professional competencies required for the teaching of agricultural science. Included is the development of curriculum and occupational education programs as well as evaluation of teaching techniques, procedures, and resource materials. Methods of teaching the handicapped will be discussed. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in AGRI 3320 and CISE 4364. Admission to the Student Teaching Program. Must be co-enrolled in AGED 4380, AGED 4365, and AGED 4366. Credit 3.

    • AGED 4365 Student Teaching in Agricultural Science.

    • AGED 4366 Student Teaching in Agricultural Science.

      Directed observation and student teaching in an approved high school agricultural science classroom are required. Participation is essential in related agricultural science and FFA activities such as fairs, shows, contests, FFA alumni and young farmer programs, etc. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in AGRI 3320 and CISE 4364. Credit 6.

    • AGED 4369 Special Topics in Agricultural Education.

      This course will examine special topics/issues and(or) subject matter in the field of agricultural education. Different subject matter can be addressed each semester. This course may be repeated as topics and subject matter change. Credit 3.

    • AGED 4380 Responsibilities of the Professional Agricultural Educator.

      This course is designed to assist future agricultural science and technology teachers in understanding the structure, organization, and management of public schools at the national, state, and local levels. Course content will include a study of the needs of the special learner, school finance and funding for career and technical education programs, agricultural science curriculum and graduation requirements, and cultural issues. The course will also focus on professionalism, program planning, personnel employment and evaluation, and legal issues critical to the success of agricultural science and technology teachers. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in AGRI 3320 and CISE 4364. Credit 3.

    • AGED 4388 Agricultural Science and Technology Program Management.

      This course focuses on developing and managing the youth leadership aspect of agricultural science and technology programs in public schools. Students will learn about leadership and career development events, the agricultural education record book documentation system, program of activity development, financial management, student and chapter awards programs, and scholarships for agricultural education students. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: 55 hours. Credit 3.


Agricultural Engineering Technology

    • AGRI 2301 Fundamentals of Agricultural Power Units and Control Systems.

      Selection, maintenance and service of agricultural power units including small engines overhaul and preventive maintenance on agricultural tractors. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 2303 Introduction to Agricultural Mechanization and Engineering.

      Introduction to current and emerging topics and industry related to agricultural engineering technology. Topics covered include: bio-diesel, wind energy, GPS/GIS applications, nanotechnology, theory of fusion of metals, efficiency of internal combustion engines, and other technology-related subjects. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3300 Agricultural Electrification.

      Principles and theory of electricity and applications in agriculture. Topics covered will include the transmission and distribution of electricity, Ohm’s Law, DC/AC current, safety, NEC, converting bio-mass to electrical power, peak demand, dispatchable power, wind energy, photo-voltaic cells, and net-metering. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: AGRI 2303 or ITEC 1390. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3310 Teaching Agricultural Technology.

      Methods in delivering instruction in agricultural technology. Principles in managing high school agricultural mechanics laboratories in a safe and efficient manner. Intended for SED minors. Prerequisite: AGRI 2303 or ITEC 1390 and Approval by Instructor. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3380 Agricultural Machinery.

      Design, construction, adjustment, operation and testing of agricultural machinery and equipment systems. Topics include theoretical and effective capacities, costs of operation, valuation of used equipment and queuing theory. Prerequisite: AGRI 2303 or ITEC 1390. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3383 Soil and Water Conservation Engineering.

      This course includes principles of soil and water conservation, erosion control, storm water management, structures for floodwater routing, culvert design, design of waterways, and retention basins. Plane surveying, topographic mapping, geographical information and global positioning systems will be utilized. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3386 Agricultural Structures and Environmental Control Systems.

      Functional requirements of agricultural buildings; valuation, appraisal and estimating; structural requirements of agricultural buildings; planning and designing major service and processing buildings. Topics discussed will include thermodynamics, confined livestock housing, and environmental controls. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: AGRI 2303 or ITEC 1390. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4371 Agricultural Safety and Health.

      This course is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of the hazards and necessary safety precautions associated with the food, fiber, natural resources and agricultural industry. Control strategies will be explored and prevention methods identified. Hazards examined include machinery, livestock, controlled spaces, pesticides, and other issues common to the food, fiber, natural resources and agricultural industry. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4381 Advanced Agricultural Mechanics.

      This course serves as a capstone course for agricultural science students with previous experience in the area of agricultural engineering technology. Teams will address and solve a complex problem and as a result may design and construct a building, trailer, or other equipment in the laboratory. Writing enhanced. Prerequisites: AGRI 2303 or ITEC 1390 and Approval by Instructor. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4384 Fusing and Joining Metallic and Non-Metallic Materials.

      A comprehensive study of the theories, principles, and procedures of bonding and fusing metallic and non-metallic materials by the electric arc, oxy-fuel, and adhesive processes. Technical classroom instruction, laboratory exercises, and field trip experiences will involve selection and utilization of new and emerging technologies and equipment, workplace planning, supervision, and management. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4385 Applied Electronics/Hydraulics in Agriculture.

      Cutting edge applications and integration of electronic and hydraulic principles and applications in agricultural and industrial processes and distribution systems. Topics include Ohm’s Law, Pascal’s Law, and principles and theory of fluid dynamics. Prerequisite: AGRI 2303 or ITEC 1390. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4387 Agricultural Engines and Tractors.

      Principles of the internal combustion engine, fuel injection, carburetion, and computerized engine monitoring equipment. Selection, valuation, wear analysis, and maintenance of power units for agricultural and industrial applications including those powered by alternative fuels will be covered. Prerequisite: AGRI 2303 or ITEC 1390. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4390 Turf and Cropland Irrigation and Drainage.

      Design and selection of surface or sub-surface irrigation and drainage systems for golf courses, greenhouses, sports fields, crops, landscape applications, and construction sites. Principles of pressurized irrigation systems including crop water requirements, soil moisture, irrigation scheduling, sprinkler irrigation, trickle irrigation, pumps, pipelines, and irrigation wells will be covered. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: AGRI 2303 or ITEC 1390. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4392 GPS Applications in Agriculture and Construction.

      Global positioning and geographic information system software and equipment will be applied in settings involving precision farming and construction. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: AGRI 2303 or ITEC 1390. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4393 Renewable Energy Sources for Agriculture.

      This course will familiarize students will existing and potential alternative energy sources and production capacities including wind, solar, bio-mass conversion, hydrogen, ethanol, vegetable oil, and bio-diesel. Impacts on the environment, ecological systems, world food supply, and economy will be studied. Prerequisite: AGRI 2303 or ITEC 1390. Credit 3.


Animal Science

    • AGRI 1119 Animal Science Laboratory.

      Laboratory for AGRI 1319. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in AGRI 1319. Credit 1.

    • AGRI 1319 Animal Science.

      This is a basic course of study to acquaint students with the scope of animal science: origin, history and development of economically important species and breeds of livestock; concepts of selection, breeding, nutrition, management and research as applied to livestock production. Laboratory experiences (AGRI 1119) involve the practical skills needed to manage animal enterprises. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 2321 Livestock Evaluation and Selection.

      This course is designed to present the basic principles and concepts in selection and evaluation of beef cattle, sheep, swine, and horses. The ability to present accurate and concise oral reasons for selecting and placing livestock is reviewed. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 2330 Companion Animal Science.

      This course is an overview of the companion animal industry, including species and breeds, feeding and nutrition, reproduction, anatomy and physiology, care, management, training, health, behavior, and current research topics related to companion animals. Prerequisite: None. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 2360 Animals and Society.

      This course will acquaint the student with the broad role of animals in society from national, global and historic perspectives. The impact of animals and domestic livestock on economic, social and political policy will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on agricultural and non-agricultural uses, societal and cultural perspectives, consumer influences, animal ethics, animal research, appropriate animal care, livestock quality assurance programs, animal welfare, animal rights and the animal-human bond. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 2364 Equine Science.

      A survey of the working and pleasure horse industry; breed selection, breeding, feeding, diseases, unsoundness and management. Laboratory work involves evaluation, care and grooming, tack and equipment, and basic management. Prerequisite: AGRI 1319 or concurrent enrollment. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 2390 Selection and Evaluation of Horses.

      This course will allow the student to become familiar with the basic concepts necessary to select and evaluate horses from a judge's perspective. Evaluation of conformation, balance, symmetry, cadence, suppleness, and impulsion will be used to understand these concepts. The ability to prepare and present oral reasons to support critical thinking and decision making skills will be reviewed. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3336 Livestock Marketing.

      This course will be a study of livestock marketing techniques, cash sales, risk management, forward contracting, problem solving using real-time livestock marketing situations, and risk of ownership of hypothetical livestock operations. Prerequisites: AGRI 1319. Credit 3. This course will allow the student to become familiar with the basic concepts necessary to select and evaluate horses from a judge's perspective. Evaluation of conformation, balance, symmetry, cadence, suppleness, and impulsion will be used to understand these concepts. The ability to prepare and present oral reasons to support critical thinking and decision making skills will be reviewed. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3340 Equine Behavior & Training I.

      This course will aid in developing skills to increase horsemanship ability and knowledge so that the student can more effectively communicate with the young horse. The fundamentals of equine behavior will be studied. Ground training methods will also be applied to teach the young horse discipline while increasing the training and value of the horse. Stable management, equipment, and pedigrees will also be discussed. Prerequisite: AGRI 2364 or concurrent enrollment. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3363 Anatomy and Physiology of Domestic Animals.

      Introduction to anatomy and physiology of domestic animals. Aspects of the nervous, skeletal, muscular, circulatory, urinary, and endocrine systems are covered. Prerequisite: AGRI 1319 and AGRI 1119. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3373 Animal Nutrition.

      This course consists of a study of the processes of digestion, absorption, metabolism, physiology, and circulation. Each nutrient is studied from the standpoint of chemistry, sources, function, and metabolism. Prerequisite: AGRI 1319 and AGRI 1119. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3376 Meat Science.

      Lecture topics will include muscle and skeletal biology, conversion of muscle to meat, food-borne illnesses and HACCP. Labs will focus on the methods of harvesting, preparation, preserving, and storing meat. Prerequisite: AGRI 1319 and AGRI 1119. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3380 Game Animal Production.

      A study of the principles and practices of game animal production. Game animals commonly used for economic diversification of agricultural enterprises are the central focus of the course. Topics include animal identification, population dynamics, nutrition, habitat preservation and modification, reproduction, game laws, and economic integration in traditional agricultural enterprises. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 3381 Game Animal Production.

      A study of the principles and practices of game animal production. Game animals commonly used for economic diversification of agricultural enterprises are the central focus of the course. Topics include animal identification, population dynamics, nutrition, habitat preservation and modification, reproduction, game laws, and economic integration in traditional agricultural enterprises. Prerequisites: AGRI 1319 or BIOL 1313 or CRIJ 2361 and Sophomore standing. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4310 Animal Growth and Performance.

      A study of the physiological and endocrine system factors affecting growth and performance of domestic animals. The course includes the study of meat animal growth and developmental processes and factors that affect body/carcass composition, carcass quality and value. Prerequisites: AGR 373 AGRI 3373. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4336 Stocker and Feedlot Management.

      The course will evaluate the basic principles involved in feeding, management, marketing and disease control of stocker and feedlot cattle for economical production of beef. A review of scientific knowledge and research advances will be applied to modern stocker and feedlot cattle operations. Prerequisites: AGRI 1319 and AGRI 1119. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4337 Behavior and Management of Domestic Animals.

      This course will study behavior associated with domesticated animals. The effects of selective breeding, physical and social environments, and the developmental stage on social organization will be studied. Additionally, aggressive behavior, sexual behavior, productivity, and the training of domestic animals will be examined. Prerequisites: AGRI 1319. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4339 Advanced Livestock and Horse Evaluation.

      This course provides an advanced study of the visual appraisal, grading, and evaluation techniques affiliated with livestock and horses. The evaluation of conformation will be studied along with the influence of heredity and environmental factors, industry trends and standards, and performance and production factors. Prerequisites: AGRI 2321 or AGRI 2390. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4360 Livestock Management Techniques.

      Skills and knowledge pertaining to the production of beef cattle, swine, goats, sheep, and horses. Laboratory exercises involve various management practices and selection of livestock based on visual evaluation and genetic performance. This course is not intended for animal science majors. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: AGRI 1319 and AGRI 1119. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4367 Stock Horse Equitation.

      The course will be an in-depth study of equitation including simple and advanced maneuvers that are essential to various types of equine performance events. Students will be expected to strengthen communication skills between horse and rider through various exercises. The university equestrian team will be developed from this course. Prerequisite: AGRI 3340. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4373 Equine Reproduction.

      General principles and applications of equine reproduction will be presented. Course material will include reproductive anatomy of the mare and the stallion and endocrinology as related to reproduction. Prerequisite: AGRI 2364 or concurrently enrolled. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4376 Sheep and Goat Production and Management.

      Application of basic genetic principles, physiology, and nutrition to practical sheep, meat goat and Angora goat production systems; management, health care and marketing of animals and fiber. Prerequisite: AGRI 1319 and AGRI 1119. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4379 Equine Nutrition.

      An overall evaluation of the equine digestive system in regards to anatomy, physiology, digestive processes, nutrient requirements, feedstuffs, management, and health care. Current topics in equine nutrition research will also be discussed. Prerequisite: AGRI 2364. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4380 Beef Cattle Production and Management.

      A study of basic principles and methods of breeding, nutrition, reproduction, management, marketing, and disease control relating to various segments of the beef industry. Application of the latest bovine research is reviewed. Laboratory exercises involve practical skills relating to performance records and management of beef cattle. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: AGRI 1319 and AGRI 1119. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4389 Animal Reproduction.

      Physiology of the male and female reproductive tract; hormones governing reproduction; the estrous cycle; mating; gestation; parturition; lactation; artificial insemination; embryo transfer technology; and factors affecting reproductive efficiency of common animal species used for agricultural purposes. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: AGRI 1319 and AGRI 1119. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4391 Equine Behavior & Training II.

      A study of equine behavior, safety, and training techniques. Laboratory work involves planning record keeping systems, feeding and breeding schedules, tack and equipment, training young stock for work and pleasure, and specialized management practices. Prerequisites: AGRI 3340. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4394 Animal Feeds and Feeding.

      A study of the characteristics of feedstuffs, a review of the essential nutrients and digestion, ration and mixture formulation, feeding methods, and nutritional management of beef, swine, sheep, goats, poultry, and horses. Exercises will consist of practical applications in formulating rations for livestock using conventional techniques and computers. Writing enhanced. Prerequisites: AGRI 3373. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4395 Animal Breeding and Genetics.

      The application of genetic principles to livestock improvement. Study of genetic basis of selection and systems of mating, and the development of breeding programs based on the principles of population genetics. Prerequisite: AGRI 1319 and AGRI 1119. Credit 3.

    • AGRI 4398 Animal Disease and Public Health

      This course will study diseases shared in nature between animals and man. Emphasis will be placed on how these diseases exist in natural environments, modes of transmission and methods of control and prevention. The course will cover infectious agents and the clinical signs that they cause in both man and animal. Prerequisite: AGRI 1319. Credit 3.


Horticulture and Crop Sciences

  • AGRI 1107 Plant Science Laboratory.

    Laboratory for AGRI 1307. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in AGRI 1307. Credit 1.

  • AGRI 1307 Plant Science.

    Basic plant morphology, classification, propagation, and crop improvement are topics discussed along with growth and development of crop plants. An introduction to soils, climate, and plant protection follow with a final overview of the major groups of cultivated plants. Credit 3.

  • AGRI 2375 Turfgrass Science.

    A study of the major turfgrass species grown in the U.S. and throughout much of the world. Explores differences in management, culture, and varietal selection for athletic, ornamental, and utility turfs. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

  • AGRI 2395 Ornamental Plant Identification.

    Identification, growth characteristics, culture and use of common landscape and greenhouse plants. Materials include trees, shrubs, vines, groundcovers, turf grasses and floriculture crops. Emphasis is placed on temperate region plants. Credit 3.

  • AGRI 2399 Floral Design.

    Principles and elements of design illustrated with the use of floral materials; techniques involved in design and construction of floral arrangements; history and utilization of floral art in society. Credit 3.

  • AGRI 3440 Soil Science.

    An introduction to the physical, biological, and chemical properties of soils and their relationships to soil formation, soil fertility, soil temperature, soil-plant-water relations, pH and liming, and conservation of soils. Environmental issues are also discussed. Prerequisites: (a) AGRI 1307 and (b) CHEM 1306, CHEM 1307, CHEM 1311, or CHEM 1312. Credit 4.

  • AGRI 3374 Production and Management of Ornamentals.

    This course is designed to cover the principles and techniques involved in the production and management of nursery and greenhouse crops including ornamental trees, shrubs, annuals, and perennials. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

  • AGRI 3379 Turfgrass Culture.

    Principles of sexual and asexual propagation of major turf species, soils and rooting media, nutrient management, irrigation, pest control, and selection of appropriate cultivars are covered in this course. Credit 3.

  • AGRI 3395 Plant Propagation Techniques.

    Principles and practices involved in propagation of plants are discussed in detail. Emphasis is placed on sexual and asexual methods of propagation and the biochemical/hormonal factors involved. Propagation techniques of several horticultural crops will be covered and practiced. Prerequisite: AGRI 1307. Credit 3.

  • AGRI 3398 Landscape Design I.

    This course covers principles, elements, and factors to be considered in preparation, planning, and design of a residential landscape. Emphasis will be placed on the incorporation of plant materials into basic landscape design. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: AGRI 2395 or instructor approval. Credit 3.

  • AGRI 4320 Fruit and Vegetable Production.

    This course is a comprehensive study of the fruit and vegetable industry in the United States. Topics of study include climatic requirements, growth characteristics, cultural practices, and pest control strategies. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: AGRI 1307. Credit 3.

  • AGRI 4330 Soil Fertility Management and Fertilizers.

    Principles of soil fertility, water, nutritional, and climatic relationships. Emphasis will be placed on sources of soil nutrients including commercial fertilizers and biological resources. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: AGRI 3440 or concurrent enrollment. Credit 3.

  • AGRI 4368 Landscape Design II.

    This course is a continuation of AGRI 3398. Design skills will be refined as students will experience more variety in design opportunities. Both small residential and larger public spaces will be the subjects of student designs. Effective graphic presentations will be stressed. Installation, maintenance, and management of residential landscapes will also be discussed. Prerequisite: AGRI 2395 or instructor approval. Credit 3.

  • AGRI 4370 Forage Crops and Pasture Management.

    Quality evaluation, adaptation, selection, culture and management of the more important plants used for pasture, hay and silage. Particular attention is given to those species grown commonly throughout the southeastern US. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

  • AGRI 4372 Sports Turf Management.

    Facility design and construction, water management, soil modification, and unique management practices commonly applied to golf courses and other sports turfs will be covered. Management of budgets, personnel, equipment maintenance and irrigation scheduling are also covered. Prerequisites: AGR 344 AGRI 3440 or instructor approval. Credit 3.

  • AGRI 4383 Range Management.

    With rangelands comprising the majority of lands in the western US, this course deals with forage-animal management topics common to the semi-arid and arid regions of the US. Addresses the unique management requirements of rangelands, the use of government-owned lands, and the competing uses of rangelands for livestock production, wildlife habitat, and recreational areas for humans. Prerequisite: AGRI 1307. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

  • AGRI 4397 Integrated Pest Management.

    A comprehensive review of current cultural, biological, mechanical, and chemical techniques used in managing or controlling agricultural and residential pests. Attention is given to environmental hazards, application methods, and safety precautions in handling and storage of pesticides. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: AGRI 1307. Credit 3.


American Studies Course Descriptions

  • AMST 2311 Introduction to American Studies


Arabic Course Descriptions

Two one-hour language laboratory periods weekly are required in each four-hour course, one of which is a concurrent lab class enrollment.

  • ARAB 1411 Elementary Arabic.

    For students with no previous instruction in Arabic. Introduction to the Arabic alphabet, pronunciation, vocabulary and basic language codes, stressing an oral approach to the language with emphasis on conversation and oral drill. Credit 3.

  • ARAB 1412 Elementary Arabic II.

    A continuation of ARAB 1311. Language codes with more complexity discussed and drilled. Stress on aural and oral skills. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ARAB 1411. Credit 3.

  • ARAB 2311 Intermediate Arabic I.

    A continuation of ARAB 1412, adding more complex structures as a basis for reading and aural comprehension as well as for oral communication. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ARAB 1412. Credit 3.

  • ARAB 2312 Intermediate Arabic II.

    A continuation of ARAB 2311. Special emphasis on practical needs for communication. Short cultural reading passages. More complex grammar. Particular emphasis on roots of Arabic words. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ARAB 2311. Credit 3.

  • ARAB 3380 The Contemporary Arab World.

    Taught in the Arabic language for additional skill development in listening, speaking, reading and writing, the course emphasizes the fifth skill: cultural knowledge with insights and perspective via the viewpoint and linguistic expression of the native Arabic speaker. Introduces and describes the linguistic and cultural ramifications of the historical, political, social and economic situations in Arab countries with some analysis & comparison among Arabic countries. An emphasis on gender issues, progress and reforms, the rise of fundamentalisms and the Arab-Israeli conflict. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ARAB 2312 or consent of Chair. Credit: 3.

  • ARAB 4075 Individual Readings in Arabic.

    This course is designed for advanced students to engage in independent study of an area of interest in Arabic Studies.

  • ARAB 4370 Seminar in Selected Topics in Arabic Culture.

    This course is an in-depth study of a selected topic. The topic to be explored will change from year to year. This course may be repeated for credit as the content varies. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in ARAB 2312 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.


American Sign Language Course Descriptions

Two one-hour language laboratory periods weekly are required in each four-hour course, one of which is a concurrent lab class enrollment.

  • SGNL 1401 Elementary American Sign Language I.

    For students who have had no previous instruction in American Sign Language. The work includes vocabulary acquisition, cultural components, drills, sentence formation, and everyday conversation leading to proficiency. Language laboratory periods weekly are required. Credit 4.

  • SGNL 1402 Elementary American Sign Language II.

    A continuation of SGNL 1401 with more speaking and writing toward advancing proficiency. Language laboratory periods weekly are required. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SGNL 1401 or equivalent. Credit 4.

  • SGNL 2311 Intermediate American Sign Language I.

    A continuation of SGNL 1402 with emphasis on more advanced skills. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SGNL 1402 or equivalent. Credit 3.

  • SGNL 2312 Intermediate American Sign Language II.

    A continuation of SGNL 2311 with emphasis on fluent usage of ASL. Intensive study with the purpose of mastering mid-level proficiency skills. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SGNL 2311 or equivalent. Credit 3.


Art Course Descriptions

  • ARTS 1301 Introduction to the Visual Arts.

    This course will introduce the visual elements of art, their nature, functions and relationships in Painting, Sculpture and Architecture to the non-major. Prerequisite: None. (Non-Majors only). Credit 3.

  • ARTS 1302 Exploring Contemporary Art.

    This course presents a critical analysis of major themes in contemporary art, providing students with an appreciation of the artifacts of human imagination. Through the processes of synthesis and interpretation, students will engage in critical, creative, and innovative communication about contemporary works of art. Prerequisite: None. (Non-Majors only). Credit 3

  • ARTS 1303 Pre-Renaissance Art History.

    This course provides a chronological survey of the major monuments of painting, sculpture, architecture, textiles, and metalwork from the ancient through the medieval periods. Prerequisite: None. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 1304 Digital Art and Emerging Technology.

    This course will strengthen and complement current course offerings in the Department of Art, in particular, by providing more course offerings for non-majors.  Our current course offerings do not include a study of contemporary art at the freshman level.

  • ARTS 1311 Basic Design I.

    The study and application of two-dimensional design elements and principles using diverse media. Prerequisite: None. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 1312 Three-Dimensional Design.

    An introduction to elements of design and the principles of arrangement as applied to problems in the third dimension. Prerequisite: None. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 1313 W.A.S.H. – 2D (Workshop in Art Studio and History 2-Dimensional).

    This studio course introduces the studio arts, art history, theory and technology to the incoming student. It is designed to immerse students in an intense program of researching, interpreting and creating art in the twenty-first century. ARTS 1313 emphasizes the 2-Dimensional Arts. Its companion courses, ARTS 1314 and ARTS 1315, support this studio course with lectures, readings, visiting artists, and demonstrations. Prerequisite: None. Co-requisite: ARTS 1314 and ARTS 1315. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 1314 W.A.S.H. – 3D (Workshop in Art Studio and History 3-Dimensional).

    This studio course introduces the studio arts, art history, theory and technology to the incoming student. It is designed to immerse students in an intense program of researching, interpreting and creating art in the twenty-first century. ARTS 1314 emphasizes the 3-Dimensional Arts. Its companion courses, ARTS 1315 and ARTS 1313, support this studio course with lectures, readings, visiting artists, and demonstrations. Prerequisite: None. Co-requisite: ARTS 1315 and ARTS 1313. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 1315 W.A.S.H. – Lecture (Workshop in Art Studio and History – Lecture).

    This course introduces the concepts, theories and information for development in ARTS 1313 and ARTS 1314, the studio components linked with this visual arts foundation course. It is an arena for students to experience lectures, demonstrations, seminar activities and visiting speakers, as well as the more traditional aspects of the discipline. It is geared towards contemporary visual concerns and uses experimental techniques to expose students to an array of styles and methodologies. Prerequisite: None. Co-requisite: ARTS 1313 and ARTS 1314. Credit: 3.

  • ARTS 1316 Drawing.

    An in-depth study of the fundamental principles of drawing and mark making. Students will draw from observation and develop the ability to create 2 dimensional representations using Line, Value, Shape, Edge, Plane and Volume, Space, Texture, Perspective, and Gesture. The use of negative space and compositional strategies are emphasized. Traditions of drawing are examined and drawing is placed in a historical context that emphasizes its importance in contemporary art. Prerequisite: None. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 1317 Life Drawing I.

    Drawing from the model in various media. Gesture drawing and figure structure are studied. Line, Value, and Shape, Plane and Volume are used as elements to depict the figure in space with accurate proportions. The study leads toward a final portfolio that demonstrates proficiency representing the figure in cohesive and complete compositions for submission to the BFA portfolio review. Prerequisite: ARTS 1316. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 1360 Introduction to Photography.

    This is a beginning course intended for non-photography majors. Content of the course includes a study of cameras, photographic materials, and visual principles. Students must provide a digital camera. (Non-Majors only) Credit 3.

  • ARTS 2311 Basic Design II.

    Continuation of Basic Design I with emphasis on various compositional approaches and color organization using a variety of materials and media. Prerequisite: ARTS 1311. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 2313 Foundations in Digital Art.

    This is an introductory course in the use of the computer as an art-making medium. The course introduces students to digital software and techniques, image creation and manipulation, digital design and compositional methods, and the use of digital tools as a vehicle of creative problem solving and personal creative expression. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, and ARTS 1315. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 2318 Beginning Sculpture.

    Students will explore a variety of processes and materials as ways of learning the vocabulary of three-dimensional art. Students will incorporate wood, metal, and found objects into art as ways of expanding their visual vocabulary. Group critiques will help the student learn contemporary approaches to art making, to improve their sculptural skills and to develop personal artistic vision. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, and ARTS 1315. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 2319 Survival Tools for the Artist.

    This class is designed to give the art studio major the tools necessary to be a successful studio artist. The primary focus will be the development of a professional portfolio that can be used for applying for graduate school, or submitting work to galleries, museums, and juried shows. Topics covered will include: how to photograph artwork, writing an artist’s statement, preparing a resume, and composing a cover letter. Crate building, mat cutting and frame-making will also be addressed. Class discussions and readings on current art topics are also required. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, and ARTS 1315. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 2323 Principles of Graphic Design.

    This entry-level course is the first in building the foundation for graphic design. The emphasis is on creative thinking and problem solving and the development of the designer’s process. Each project builds upon the previous in depth and complexity of that process. The student is introduced to computer application of two-dimensional concepts and output. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 2313. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 2343 Animation Concepts and Techniques.

    The principles and techniques of traditional animation, including the principles of motion, storyboarding, flipbooks, cel and pencil animation. Also introduces students to the use of computers in animation. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 1316. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 2344 2D Computer Animation.

    In this course, computer software is used to create 2D animations that incorporate traditional techniques and styles such as drawing and painting, cut paper, cel animation and stop action. Story development is emphasized and video editing techniques are practiced. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2343 and ARTS 3317. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 2353 Pre Visualization.

    This course focuses on the fundamental techniques that are used in visual development for entertainment design. The assignments are intended to develop rapid drawing and rendering skills. The topics will include quick sketching, thumbnails, basic composition, and perspective. A special emphasis will be placed on efficient digital rendering techniques that encompass the use of value to define form. The goal of this course is to provide an efficient approach to generating distinctive designs in a production environment. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, and ARTS 1315. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 2360 Photographic Principles.

    Designed for non-majors and minors, this course introduces students to the technical principles and creative potential of photography. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 2365 Photographic Visualization.

    Students will be introduced to advanced exposure techniques and the principles necessary to master use of the large format camera. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 2370 Digital Photography I.

    This course introduces the student to the tools and techniques used in the scanning, creation, manipulation, and presentation of digital images. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 2375 Photographic Concepts.

    Students are introduced to basic camera functions and concepts, use of visual design elements and articulation of personal ideas through the medium of fine art photography. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3305 Painting I.

    An introduction to the materials, techniques and concepts of oil painting. Emphasis is placed on painting from observation, the depiction light and shadow, and basic color theory. Process based painting and concept based abstraction are explored. Students will learn to recognize and use the tools and materials and nomenclature related to oil painting including supports and grounds, mediums, binders and brushes. The role of Painting in art history and in contemporary art will be examined. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3307 Performance and Video Art.

    Students will explore performance and video art both in practice and theory including live performance, performance and video, live presence/virtual spaces, performance for the camera, site specific performance, and collaborative performance. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3310 Printmaking.

    An introduction to the techniques and procedures of printmaking. The emphasis is on relief, monoprint, and intaglio methods. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316, and ARTS 2313. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3315 Collage.

    A class which follows the precepts of the twentieth century art form of using and exploring the juxtaposition and layering of a variety of materials and images. The dynamics of composition and a further investigation of the use of color and inherent capabilities of contrasting images and textures will be studied. Students will use a variety of materials including the found object, discarded papers, invented textures and painted surfaces to create their imagery. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2313, and ARTS 2318. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3317 Life Drawing II.

    This course explores the use of the figure as subject matter in art. Observational skills are practiced and refined and personal expression is emphasized. A variety of media are explored. The use of the figure in contemporary art is studied. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 1317. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3320 Ceramics.

    An introduction to clay, the potential it has as a material and an overview of the basic principles involved in the forming/processing of it. The basic forming techniques will explore all aspects of hand building (pinch, coil and slab construction), as well as an introduction to the wheel. Basic firing techniques and finishes will be discussed. The emphasis of the course will be rooted in sculpture. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3322 Typography.

    This foundation course introduces an overview of history, principles, processes and terminology of typography. Type sensitivity is developed through a variety of means: classifying and identifying typefaces, designing typographic logotypes, as well as designing with type. The majority of work is created on the computer. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2323, ARTS 2313, and ARTS 1317. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3323 Graphic Design in Context.

    The techniques and processes of print media are explored. The use of color is emphasized. Students will be exposed to historical and aesthetic issues. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2323, ARTS 3322. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3324 Corporate Identity Design.

    Publication design problems are presented as they relate to a specific corporation/product. Typical projects include corporate identity systems and ad campaigns. Production methods are individually explored to produce presentation quality mockups. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2323, ARTS 3322, and ARTS 3323. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3325 Methods & Materials.

    An introduction to sculptural form through projects involving woodworking and welding. Lectures and demonstrations will be given on tools, materials and safety procedures. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 2318. Credit 3.

  • Graphic Design Production.

    This advanced course focuses on graphic design production techniques and the application of contemporary tools and processes employed by visual designers. This course emphasizes the mastery of a digital workflow, concluding with the physical output. Pre-requisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316, ARTS 2313, ARTS 2323, ARTS 3322. Credit 3

  • Packing Design.

    This course will explore graphic communication and techniques for packaging structure and three dimensional design issues. Experimentation with diverse materials and forms, typography, color and images will be developed for the targeted audience based on depth of research and design brief. In additions packaging sustainability will be addressed. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1316, ARTS 2313, ARTS 2323, and ARTS 3322. Credit 3

  • ARTS 3343 Introduction to 3D Computer Animation.

    Basics of 3D Animation including 3D modeling techniques, key-framing and graph editing, shading, lighting and rendering. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 2343 or ARTS 3317. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3344 Advanced 3D Computer Animation.

    This course is designed for students who are experienced with basic 3D animation concepts and technical practice. The course introduces more sophisticated concepts and techniques and emphasizes animation development through hands-on practice. The course will focus on animation concepts, creative animation design, and expanding students’ knowledge of topics, tools, and techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2343, ARTS 3317, and ARTS 3343. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3353 Motion Graphics.

    A study of the use of type in motion to create animated graphic designs, logos, titles, and animated concrete poetry. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2343, and ARTS 3317. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3354 Experimental Animation.

    This course is an exploration of alternative techniques in the creation of animation to include cutout animation, pixilation, lo-fi animation, as well as other emerging processes. Coursework will also focus on experimental approaches to story and content generation. Readings and discussions will focus on technical, aesthetic, and theoretical issues relating to these disciplines. Prerequisite: ARTS 2343. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3360 The Photographic Digital Print.

    This course will provide an investigation of traditional and alternative digital photographic printing and mixed media processes. Students will complete a portfolio of original photographic work demonstrating personal creative and conceptual development. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, and ARTS 2375. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3362 Environmental Portraits.

    Blending portraiture and context, the environmental portrait illuminates the character and personality of its subject. Learning to photograph people in their natural surroundings thus capturing insight into their lives is the goal of this course. Students will complete a portfolio of original photographic work focusing on the topic of environmental portraiture. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, and ARTS 2375. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3364 Photography Seminar.

    A different topic is presented each semester. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, ARTS 2375. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3366 Human Form: A Photographic Study.

    This course will take an investigative look into the use of the human form through the medium of photography. There will be discussion of the variety of contexts and representations of the human body throughout the history of art. Students will complete a body of photographic work using or referencing the human figure. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, and ARTS 2375. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3368 Studio Practices I.

    Students learn the fundamentals of working with light both in the studio and on location. They are introduced to the use and control of existing light as well as high-powered electronic flash in the realm of digital photography. Prerequisites: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, and ARTS 2375. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3369 Studio Practices II.

    This course is a continuation of ARTS 3368. Students will learn advanced studio lighting techniques while completing a body of creative photographic work. Prerequisites: ARTS ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, 2365, ARTS 2370, ARTS 2375, and ARTS 3368 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3370 Digital Photography II.

    This course will engage students in an advanced study of the tools, techniques, and applications of digital photography. Emphasis is placed on non-destructive manipulation of images and digital workflow techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 2370. Credit: 3.

  • ARTS 3373 Digital Imaging.

    This course involves the exploration of advanced computer imaging techniques in support of individual student interests. Advanced capture, manipulation, and printing procedures are explored and applied in developing digital portfolios. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 2370. Credit 3 or 6.

  • ARTS 3374 Alternative Photo Processes.

    In this course students are introduced to a variety of non-standard photographic processes. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, and ARTS 2375. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3375 Web Site Development.

    This course introduces students to the process of designing and creating web sites for the World Wide Web. Beginning with an understanding of the Internet and HTML, the basic language of the web, students move on to work with authoring tools used in building and maintaining websites. The course concludes with a discussion of challenges facing web designers and the future of this powerful communication tool. Prerequisite: ARTS 2370. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3376 Photographic Narratives.

    This course provides a broad and intensive investigation of visual narratives through photographic representation. Photographic books, journals, installations, slide shows, and mixed media collage will be explored as a means of developing visual fluency and personal expression. The implications of photographic sequencing and contextual significance will also be an emphasis of this course. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, and ARTS 2375. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3378 Contemporary Issues in Photography.

    This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of contemporary photographic trends. The work of photographers who are currently having an impact on fine art photography will be discussed along with critical analysis of art theory. Students will be expected to complete a body of photographic work that demonstrates personal conceptual development. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, and ARTS 2375. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3379 Exhibition Photography.

    The course deals with the fundamentals of gallery exhibition. Emphasis is placed on developing and promoting a personal photographic style. A study is also made of archival techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, and ARTS 2375. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3381 History of Photography.

    A study is made of the history of photography from its earliest beginnings. Technical, visual, aesthetic and social aspects are considered. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: ARTS 3385. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3382 The History of Animation.

    A survey of the History of Animation from early cartoons through contemporary special effects and 3D characters. The political, artistic and social uses of animation are examined. Prerequisite: ARTS 3385. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3383 Design History.

    Design History provides an in-depth study of styles, schools, philosophies, and parallel fields of design from the Industrial Revolution to current day. Emphasis will be on the development of the profession of graphic design and its relationship to commerce and technology. Prerequisite: ARTS 2386. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 3385 Survey II: Renaissance to Post-Modern Art History.

    This course provides a chronological survey of the major monuments of painting, sculpture, architecture, textiles, and metalwork from the medieval period to the present. Prerequisite: None. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4019 Undergraduate Seminar in Art.

    An undergraduate seminar course concerning problems selected within an area of specialization. Prerequisites: 6 hours of credit in the area of investigation, with permission of the instructor and department chair. (This course may be taken for Academic Distinction credit. See Academic Distinction Program in this catalog.) Variable credit.

  • ARTS 4305 Advanced Painting.

    Exploration of traditional painting processes and concepts along with the introduction of non-traditional techniques and materials. Emphasis is placed on skill development and individual exploration of ideas. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 3305. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4307 Painting in Aquamedia.

    The focus is on transparent watercolor. Landscape, still life, and the figure are emphasized, along with experimentation. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 1316. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4310 Advanced Printmaking.

    Advanced problems in printmaking. Special procedures and problems involving further investgation of various printmaking media and formats. An emphasis is placed on creative development. Prerequisite: ARTS 3310. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4313 W.A.S.H. Practicum.

    Students will gain leadership and advanced critique skills while mentoring other students, contributing and participating the Workshop in Art Studio and History (W.A.S.H.) program. Additionally, student ill be expected to complete an independent studio project. Prerequisite: Departmental Approval is required. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4315 Professional Practices in Art.

    This capstone course examines practical applications of exhibition, presentation, documentation, professional writing skills, and career planning specific to studio art. It provides a foundation of practical information to assist undergraduate studio majors in building a successful career after they complete their undergraduate degree. This course should be taken in the senior year, preferably the semester of graduation. Prerequisite: Senior status, departmental approval. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4316 Advanced Drawing.

    Drawing problems with emphasis on the development of personal expressive techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 3317. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4317 Museum and Gallery Practices.

    This course focuses on the practices and operations of Alternative Art Spaces, Commercial Art Galleries, and Museums of Art. Students will visit museums and galleries in the area and assist with exhibitions in the Gaddis Geeslin Gallery in the Department of Art. The course will cover art handling and installation, registration procedures, and curatorial theories and practices. Students will curate and mount an exhibit, and prepare press materials and publicity as a course project. Prerequisite: ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 1317, ARTS 2313, ARTS 3385. Credit: 3.

  • ARTS 4318 Sculpture.

    The exploration of three-dimensional media through the proper use of tools, working processes, and a variety of materials. Emphasis placed on skill development and individual exploration of ideas. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 2318. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4320 Advanced Ceramics.

    A continued exploration of clay with an emphasis on personal expression and discovery. The course is geared towards those students dedicated to understanding the contemporary issues surrounding the material in relationship to their own work and methodology. There are a number of required readings/writings, along with several group discussions. Additional technical information will be provided regarding advanced techniques (mold-making, firing wood/gas/soda kilns, and alternative building techniques). Interdisciplinary work is encouraged. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 3320. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4323 Senior Studio in Graphic Design.

    An internship in an approved field and an intense portfolio review. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2323, ARTS 3322, ARTS 3323, and ARTS 3324. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4325 Advanced Typographic Design

    Advanced Typographic Design is an exploration of typography beyond its foundations. Students will investigate the interdependence of type, image and content as they relate to visual communication. Experimental and hand created type will be explored with eh goal of developing a sophisticated typographic voice. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 3323. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4331 Illustration.

    This course promotes the inventive and individual solutions to illustrational problems, explores relationships of the image to the text and develops individual skill level using a variety of media, including the computer. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 3317. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4333 Interactive Design.

    This is an advanced course for web design concepts and processes as well as motion graphics applying Dreamweaver, Flash, Photoshop, and ImageReady applications. The course addresses terminology of the web environment, usability, web file formats, JavaScript, web typography, and web graphics. In addition, this course introduces web-based interactive multimedia including animation, sound, and motion graphics. Prerequisites: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 3375, and ARTS 3323. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4345 3D Modeling for Computer Animation and Design.

    Techniques used in creating 3D models for computer animation are studied, including Polygonal modeling, Nurbs and Subdivision surfaces. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, and ARTS 3344. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4350 Character Animation.

    This course explores the techniques of character animation and rigging using pre-rigged characters and models in 3D computer software. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 3317, and ARTS 2343, ARTS 2344, and ARTS 3343. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4355 Shading, Lighting and Rendering.

    An in depth study of surfaces and shaders including: texture and image mapping, lighting for compositing, cel shading, and rendering methods. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2323, and ARTS 3344. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4356 Interactive Animation.

    An in depth study of surfaces and shaders including: texture and image mapping, lighting for compositing, cel shading, and rendering methods. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2323, and ARTS 3344. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4357 Computer Animation for Interactive Games.

    This course is an in-depth study of 2D Interactive Multimedia Technologies for the creation and distribution of content over the internet and as stand-alone desktop applications. Coursework will concentrate on the development of interactive audio and video, interactive narratives, and game production. Focus will be on both asset creation and scripting for these types of applications. Readings and discussions will focus on technical, aesthetic, and theoretical issues relating to this evolving art medium. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 3317, ARTS 2343, and ARTS 3343. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4358 Animation Portfolio.

    Students in this course will create a work in a specific area of expertise and author a demo reel using this work and refined work from previous courses. A digital portfolio will be created and job searching skills such as presentation and resume building will be taught. Prerequisite: 12 hours of animation studio and approval of instructor. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4375 Expressive Photography.

    An exploration is made of the creative application of the photographic image as a means of personal expression. Course requirements include the completion of a portfolio of creative work. Prerequisite: ARTS 1313, ARTS 1314, ARTS 1315, ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, and ARTS 2375. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4378 Portfolio.

    This course is designed to assist students in completing a comprehensive, cohesive portfolio and preparing for graduate studies, submission of work to galleries, and other professional practices. Recommended for all graduating seniors. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisites: ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, and ARTS 2375. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4379 Directed Studies.

    This course is provided to allow the student, under the supervision of a faculty member, to develop specialized skills, to conduct an investigation into an area of special interest.. Regular meetings will be held with the faculty sponsor. The course will culminate in a portfolio of photographs and/or a scholarly written report. Departmental approval is required before student may enroll in this course. May be repeated or taken concurrently to a maximum of 6 hours. Prerequisites: ARTS 2365, ARTS 2370, and ARTS 2375. Variable credit.

  • ARTS 4386 History of American Art

    A history of American architecture, painting, and sculpture from the colonial period to the present. Pre-requisite: ARTS 3385.

  • ARTS 4387 The History of Mexican Art.

    This course is a survey of Mexican and Mesoamerican art. Students will study images of prehistoric artifacts and the art and architecture of pre-hispanic cultures including the Olmec, Mixtec, Maya, and Aztec. The impact of the Spanish conquest, the role of art in the Mexican Revolution and the Socialist movement, Arte Popular, the Muralists, late twentieth century and contemporary Mexican art are also explored. Prerequisite: ARTS 3385. Credit: 3.

  • ARTS 4388 History of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Art.

    A survey of major artistic movements and artists working in painting, sculpture and architecture. Prerequisite: ARTS 1303 and ARTS 3385. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

  • ARTS 4389 Criticism and Theory in the Visual Arts.

    The study of historical and contemporary aspects of major thinking concerning the visual arts. Prerequisite: ARTS 1303 and ARTS 3385. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.


Bilingual Education Course Descriptions

  • BESL 2301 Multicultural Influences on Learning.

    This course examines how the diversity of the United States influences classroom learning. Linguistic dialects, socio-economic status, and cultural diversity are among the factors examined in relation to the educational process. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Credit 3.

  • BESL 3301 Language Acquisition Theory for Second Language Learners.

    This course examines language acquisition theories and philosophies related to learning a second language from early childhood to adult. The course also examines the history, rationale, political, community and global perspectives of bilingual education and English as a second language programs. Emphasis is placed on the principles and implementation of how children learn a language or languages, and how educators can develop academic programs and curriculum plans incorporating local, state, and national policies. Field experiences in K-12 public schools may be required. Prerequisite: BESL 2301. Credit 3.

  • BESL 4304 Language Learning and Literacy Development in Multilingual Students.

    This course provides an intensive study of the theories of language learning and literacy development for students learning English as a second language. Processes and strategies on the development of oral language and reading in the first and second languages are emphasized.  Taught in Spanish. Field experience in K-6 public schools required. Taken concurrently with BESL 4303. Prerequisite: 50 hours, BESL 3301 and TESL 4303. Credit 3.

  • BESL 4301 Spanish Fluency in the Classroom.

    This course is designed for persons interested in teaching in a Spanish instructional environment. Terminology specific to the instructional process, curriculum, and community is emphasized. Linguistic and cultural comparisons among different Spanish dialects represented in Texas are examined. The course is taught in Spanish. Prerequisite: Admission to educator preparation program required, field experiences in K-12 public schools included in this course. Prerequisite: 50 hours. Credit 3.

  • BESL 4302 Individual Problems in Bilingual Education and English as a Second Language Programs.

    This course is designed for persons interested in enhancing educational principles related to current bilingual and English as a second language issues. This course will address specific topics for independent study related to second language learning, methodologies, curriculum, instruction, evaluation, parent/community involvement, program design and field experiences. Prerequisite: None. Credit 3.

  • BESL 4303 Curriculum in Bilingual and Second Language Programs.

    This course identifies appropriate curricula and teaching strategies to teach reading, language arts, mathematics, science and social studies to second language learners. Principles of current content area curriculum and instructional theory as related to language learning in a bilingual classroom are studied. This course is taught in Spanish. Field experiences in K-6 schools required. Taken concurrently with BESL 4304. Prerequisite: BESL 3301 and TESL 4303. Credit 3.

  • BESL 4320 Student Teaching in a Bilingual or ESL Classroom.

    The EC-6 Bilingual Generalist candidate is assigned to student teaching in a bilingual/elementary classroom full time for approximately seven weeks. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching program. Credit 3.


Biology Course Descriptions

  • BIOL 1401 Environmental Science.

    A general course designed to cover all areas relating to contemporary ecological problems. Topics include air, water, and soil pollution; radiation, limnology, climate, pesticides, wastes, and land conservation. This course is designed for non-science majors to help them meet their General Education science requirement, and as in introductory course in environmental science for ENVR majors. BIOL 1401 cannot be applied to either a major or a minor in Biology. Includes a 2 hour lab. Fall, Spring. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 1408 Contemporary Biology.

    Presentation for the non-science major of biological concepts and topical subjects related to science methods, embryological development, reproduction, genetics, evolution, human organ systems, disease, and environmental biology. Ethical considerations of reproduction and birth control, genetic engineering, environmental pollution and population control will be included. This course is designed for non-science majors to help them meet their General Education science requirement and cannot be applied to either a major or a minor in Biology. Includes a 2 hour lab. Fall, Spring, Summer. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 1411 General Botany.

    General principles of botany are presented. Emphasis is placed on morphology, taxonomy, genetics, physiology, and ecology of plants in an evolutionary and ecological context. Students may begin sequence with either BIOL 1411 or BIOL 1413. Includes a 3 hour lab. Fall, Spring, Summer. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 1413 General Zoology.

    General principles of zoology are presented in an evolutionary context. Emphasis is placed on the anatomy, behavior, and ecology of animals. Students are introduced to evolutionary and ecological principles of biology. Students may begin sequence with either BIOL 1411 or BIOL 1413. Includes a 3 hour lab. Fall, Spring, Summer. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 1436 Foundations of Science.

    The course focuses on the nature of science as a reliable method of acquiring knowledge about the natural world. Students will learn how to apply key scientific facts, concepts, laws and theories to distinguish science from non-science, bad science, and pseudoscience by analyzing a variety of claims and case studies. By employing an innovative, interdisciplinary approach to science education, this course is designed to increase science literacy and critical thinking skills for introductory-level students. This course is designed for non-science majors to help them meet their General Education science requirement and cannot be applied to either a major or a minor in Biology. Students must enroll concurrently in the corresponding lab for this course. Includes a lab. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 2301 Cell Biology and Genetics.

    An integrated conceptual study of the biochemical, molecular, and cellular processes that support life from a health and disease perspective.  The molecular mechanisms that regulate cell function, the molecular signaling processes that form the basis of integrated function and the response to disease, and the mechanisms underlying inherited traits and genetic disease will be presented.  Emphasis is placed on defining and characterizing normal cell function.  This course may not be used by Biology majors or minors as credit toward graduation.  Fall & Spring.  Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 2402 and CHEM 1405 (1305/1106); Sophomore standing consent of the instructor. Credit 3.

  • BIOL 2401 Human Anatomy.

    This course deals with structure and form of the human body. It includes studies of cells, tissues, and organ systems. Registration is primarily for students in prenursing or majors in kinesiology or health. Two-hour laboratory. Fall, Spring. Credit in this course cannot be applied to either a major or minor in Biology. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 2402 Human Physiology.

    This course will help students identify and understand the function of several important human organ systems and how these systems maintain homeostasis. Topics and the mechanisms involving circulation, digestion, metabolism, muscle action and respiration will receive the most emphasis. This course is designed to emphasize a clinical knowledge of physiology and techniques required by students studying nursing, physical therapy, and related health fields. Two-hour laboratory. Fall and Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 2401, BIOL 2402 and either CHEM 1406 (1306/1106), or CHEM 1411 (1311/1111). Credit in this course cannot be applied to either a major or minor in Biology. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 2420 Introductory Applied Microbiology.

    An introduction to microorganisms, their morphology, growth requirements, methods of culture, and the manner in which they affect health. Reactions of the body toward pathogenic organisms and the principles of immunity and chemotherapy are considered. Three-hour laboratory. Writing enhanced. Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 2401 & BIOL 2402. Credit in this course cannot be applied to a major or minor in Biology. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 2440 Introductory Cell Biology.

    An introduction to the study of cells, including scientific methods, biochemistry, metabolism, cell energetics, membranes, cellular evolution, DNA, protein synthesis, the cytoskeleton, cell division, and the cellular basis of inheritance, with emphasis on the development of problem solving skills. Two-hour laboratory. Fall, Spring, Summer. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), and CHEM 1406 (1306/1106) or 1411 (1311/1111). Credit 4.

  • BIOL 3364 Plant Taxonomy.

    A study of the characteristics and classification of plants emphasizing systematic techniques. Focus on identification of the more common plant families allows transfer of knowledge to other regions of the country and world. Two-hour laboratory. Spring. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113). Credit 3.

  • BIOL 4080 Field and Experiential Learning in Biology.

    This course provides students with a first-hand off-campus opportunity to experience biology in a specialized setting. Potential settings include both domestic and international sites, and may consist of particular ecological regions, biological reserves, field data collection sites, laboratories, and clinics. Course prerequisites will be tailored to the specific off-campus course offering. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), and BIOL 2440. Variable credit. This change in title, number and course description is subject to approval by the Texas State University Board of Regents and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board.

  • BIOL 3409 General Ecology.

    A study of physical and biotic components of the environment, responses of organisms to their environment, community ecology, natural ecosystems, and human’s interaction with ecosystems. Field studies are an integral part of the laboratory. Three-hour laboratory and field work. Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113). Credit 4.

  • BIOL 3410 Human Biology.

    This course deals with the study of structure and function of the human body. The structure of various organ systems are discussed and their function as organs and systems described. Two-hour laboratory as needed. Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), and BIOL 2440. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 3420 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy.

    A study of representative vertebrates, their anatomy, ontogeny, and phylogeny. The course is strongly recommended for premedical/professional students.. Three-hour laboratory. Fall. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113) or consent of the instructor. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 3430 Plant Physiology.

    General course dealing with principal life processes of plants. Topics include photosynthesis, respiration, nutrition, flowering, dormancy, hormones, growth, and development. Three-hour laboratory. Writing enhanced. Even year, Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), and BIOL 2440; CHEM 1411 (1311/1111) and CHEM 1412 (1312/1112). Credit 4.

  • BIOL 3440 General Physiology.

    The study of the primary mechanisms by which autotrophic and heterotrophic organisms function. Important fundamental aspects of cellular, regulatory, and systemic physiology are presented emphasizing the functional aspect of living systems at the cellular and molecular levels. Students are expected to develop an integrated understanding of the areas presented and recognize the interdependence of these mechanisms in the maintenance of homeostasis. Three-hour laboratory. Writing enhanced. Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), BIOL 2440, CHEM 1411 (1311/1111), CHEM 1412 (1312/1112), CHEM 2423 (2323/2123). Credit 4.

  • BIOL 3450 Introductory Genetics.

    Study is made of the physical bases of inheritance and principles of heredity and variation. Topics include Mendelian genetics, cytogenetics, molecular basis of genetics, gene expression and regulation, and DNA technologies. Two-hour laboratory. Writing enhanced. Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1313/1113, BIOL 2440, CHEM 1411 (1311/1111), CHEM 1412(1312/1112). Credit 4.

  • BIOL 3460 Pathophysiology.

    A study of basic physiological systems and underlying system dysfunctions associated with human disease processes across the life span. Relationships between etiologic agents and their consequence to human form and function will be stressed. Critical thinking processes integrating symptoms, treatment and prognosis will be applied to physiological perspectives. Four hours lecture per week. Spring. Prerequisites: CHEM 1406 (1306/1106) OR CHEM 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 2401, BIOL 2402, or consent of instructor. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 3461 Fish, Wildlife, Recreation Management.

    The history and basic principles, philosophy and concepts of wildlife management as they relate to habitats, people, and the problems associated with their interactions. Three-hour laboratory and field work. Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), and BIOL 3409. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 3469 Economic Entomology.

    A study of basic principles of entomology as related to modern principles of insect pest management. Included are discussions of the biology and control of economically important insects in Texas. Collections of insects are made. Not open to students with credit in BIOL 4410. Two hours lecture and two hours laboratory as needed. Even year, Fall. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), and BIOL 2440. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 3470 General Microbiology.

    An introduction to microorganisms including bacteria, viruses and fungi. Major areas considered are morphology, physiology, genetics, and pathology. Microorganisms are studied in relation to soil, water, food, industrial processes, and disease. Three-hour laboratory. Writing enhanced. Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), BIOL 2440, CHEM 1411 (1311/1111), CHEM 1412(1312/1112). Credit 4.

  • BIOL 3480 Vertebrate Embryology.

    This is a study of the early development of representative vertebrates from fertilization until differentiation of organs has been completed. Two-hour laboratory. Writing enhanced. Even year, Fall. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), BIOL 2440. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 3490 Histology.

    A study of animal tissues with emphasis on human materials. Identification and preparatory techniques are stressed. Three-hour laboratory as needed. Writing enhanced as needed. Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), BIOL 2440, CHEM 1411 (CHEM 1311/1111), CHEM 1412 (1312/1112). Credit 4.

  • BIOL 3492 Plant Morphology.

    Survey of the plant kingdom with emphasis on morphogenesis, comparative structure and life cycles of representative plant forms. Fall, Summer. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (BIOL 1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (BIOL 1313/1113), and BIOL 2440. Three-hour laboratory. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 4095 Undergraduate Research Topics in Biology.

    This course is designed to allow selected, advanced students in specific areas of biology to participate directly in biological research. The research project will be developed jointly by the student and a faculty mentor, and must be pre-approved by the Chair of the Department of Biological Sciences. Prerequisite: Biology major, minimum Junior standing. This course may be taken for Academic Distinction credit. See Academic Distinction Program in this Catalog. Credit 1-4.

  • BIOL 4096 Special Topics in Undergraduate Biology.

    This course of faculty-led study is designed to provide exposure of undergraduate students to new biological topics and concepts in a course setting, prior to that course's formal Department, College, and University course adoption. This course may be repeated for different Special Topics (different courses). Prerequisite: Biology major, minimum Junior standing. Credit 1-4.

  • BIOL 4110 Undergraduate Seminar.

    Discussions of current literature in the biological sciences. Required of senior Biology majors. Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Biology major, Senior standing. Credit 1.

  • BIOL 4111 Undergraduate Seminar.

    Discussions of current research presented by faculty participating in the Department of Biological Sciences weekly seminar series. Credit 1.

  • BIOL 4306 Philosophy of Biology.

    This course will help the student understand the philosophical issues associated with defining and applying theoretical terms and constructs within evolutionary biology. Writing enhanced. Even year, Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), BIOL 2440, and 8 hrs. advanced biology, and Junior standing. Credit 3.

  • BIOL 4320 Environmental Toxicology.

    (Also listed as ENVR 4320). This course presents basic toxicology as a qualitative and quantitative science of the effects of poisons (toxins) upon the environment, individuals, and populations. The course will also provide a comparison of the toxicology of human and other species’ exposure to common environmental contaminants. Writing enhanced. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory as needed. Prerequisites: BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), and BIOL 2420 or BIOL 3470; MATH 3379 or BIOL 4374; 8 hrs. CHEM, and Junior standing. Credit 3.

  • BIOL 4330 Aquatic Biology.

    Physical, chemical, and biological features of inland waters; organisms of freshwater; factors in biological productivity; methods and equipment. Largely a field course dealing with various approved methods of studying freshwater systems. This course is designed to meet the needs of chemists, teachers of science, biologists, and environmental scientists. Two-hour laboratory. Spring. Prerequisites: 11 hrs. biology. Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), CHEM 1411 (1311/1111), CHEM 1412 (1312/1112), and Junior standing. Credit 3.

  • BIOL 4340 Electron Microscopy.

    This course is designed to teach students the methods of preparing specimens for electron microscope analysis and to use the electron microscope as a tool to conduct research. Students will become competent in using the electron microscope for visual analysis or chemical elemental analysis. Writing enhanced. Spring. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1311/1111, BIOL 1313/1113, BIOL 2440, and 12 hrs. advanced biology, and Junior standing. Credit 3.

  • BIOL 4350 Immunology.

    Humoral and cell-mediated immunobiology, genetics, and chemistry are considered along with immunoanalyses and pathologies. Spring. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), BIOL 2440, BIOL 3470, CHEM 1412 (2323/2123) and Junior standing. CHEM 3438 is strongly recommended. Credit 3.

  • BIOL 4360 Genetic Analysis of Human Disease.

    A study of the transmission and molecular basis of human genetic traits and genetic diseases. Various simple and complex genetic disorders will be examined using pedigree, molecular, and biochemical analyses. Novel approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of human genetic disorders will be discussed. Special topics examining the ethical, legal, and social issues and concerns of genetic testing and discrimination, germ line therapy, genetic enhancement, and human cloning will be examined. Writing enhanced. Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 3450 and Junior standing. Credit 3.

  • BIOL 4361 Introductory Evolutionary Biology.

    Evolution is the core theory of modern biology. Students will be introduced to the major principles of evolutionary biology, from the history of evolutionary thought through theory and current concepts of evolution. Emphasis will be placed on molecular and cellular evolution, mechanisms of evolution including natural selection, gene flow, founder effect, and speciation. Writing enhanced. Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), BIOL 2440, and 8 hrs. advanced biology, and Junior standing. Credit 3.

  • BIOL 4370 Microbial Ecology.

    This course introduces the student to basic ecological concepts through the study of microbial communities. Interactions at the microscopic and macroscopic levels will be discussed along with biogeochemical cycles. Bioremediation concepts will also be explored. Two one-hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory as needed. Prerequisites: BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), BIOL 2440, and BIOL 2420 or BIOL 3470, CHEM 2425 (2325/2125), and Junior standing. Credit 3.

  • BIOL 4374 Biostatistics.

    This course includes an introduction to statistical methods and their application to real biological problems. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation and regression, and analysis of variance. Use of the computer in statistical analyses will also be stressed. Fall. Prerequisites: MATH 1314 or MATH 1420, and minimum grade of C in 8 hrs. of biology. Credit 3.

  • BIOL 4380 Medical Microbiology.

    An advanced study of the microorganisms that cause disease and of the disease processes with focus on bacteria and viruses. Emphasis will be placed on pathology, epidemiology and treatment/prevention of specific infectious diseases of medical importance. Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 3470 and Junior standing or consent of the instructor. Credit 3.

  • BIOL 4410 General Entomology.

    A study is made of insect morphology, taxonomy, development, and life histories. Collection and identification by use of keys are stressed. Two-hour laboratory. Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), and BIOL 2440. Junior standing. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 4430 Vertebrate Natural History.

    This course deals with the taxonomy, natural history, and ecology of vertebrates. Laboratories emphasize the identification of Texas Vertebrates and field techniques used in their study. Two-hour laboratory. Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), and Junior standing. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 4460 Parasitology.

    Morphology, life cycles, physiological adaptations, evolution, and distribution of parasitic animals. Three-hour laboratory. Fall. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of a C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), and Junior or Senior standing. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 4470 Animal Behavior.

    A study of the mechanisms and functional explanations of behavior. Experimental approaches to addressing questions of behavior will be emphasized. Topics will include behavioral genetics, neuroethology, migration, habitat selection, foraging, communication, social behavior, reproductive strategies, and human sociobiology. Field studies and independent projects will be integral components of this course. Two-hour laboratory. Writing enhanced. Fall. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), and Junior standing. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 4471 Invertebrate Zoology.

    This course will explore the diversity of invertebrate types morphologically, embryologically and physiologically. The ecological role of invertebrates will be emphasized. Two-hour laboratory. Even year, Fall. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), and Junior standing. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 4475 Physiological Ecology.

    A study of the functional processes of organisms within the context of ecological and evolutionary theory, focusing on mechanisms of organismal function, energetics, and the energetic consequences of homeostasis when function is influenced by the environment and other ecological and evolutionary processes. This course is designed for students preparing for graduate studies in integrative biology and does not meet the physiology requirement or recommendation for physiology of medical/dental or allied health programs. Three-hour laboratory. Writing enhanced. Spring. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 3450 and BIOL 3409; BIOL 4361 strongly recommended, Junior standing. This course offering is subject to approval by the Texas State University Board of Regents and the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 4480 Molecular Biology.

    A hands-on study of the structure and function of molecules important for the Central Dogma of molecular biology, including DNA and protein, with emphasis on electrophoretic analysis and gene cloning. Three-hour laboratory. Writing enhanced. Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), BIOL 2440, BIOL 3450, BIOL 3470, CHEM 2425 (2325/2125), and Junior standing. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 4490 Advanced Cell Biology.

    A study of eukaryotic cell structure and function, including protein synthesis, membrane structure and function, intracellular trafficking, cell communication, cell motility, mitosis, and cell cycle control, with emphasis on the use of model organisms. Three-hour laboratory. Writing enhanced. Fall. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 1411 (1311/1111), BIOL 1413 (1313/1113), BIOL 2440, BIOL 3450, CHEM 1411 (1311/1111), CHEM 1412 (1312/1112), and Junior standing. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 4493 Endocrinology.

    This course is designed to familiarize the student with the structure, development, comparative anatomy, and physiology of the endocrine system. Two-hour laboratory. Writing enhanced. Spring, or as needed. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 2440 and BIOL 3450; CHEM 1411 (1311/1111), CHEM 1412 (1312/1112), and Junior standing. Credit 4.

  • BIOL 4394 Biological Sciences Internship.

    A supervised, off-campus intern work experience in an approved area of the biological sciences with business, industry or government. This elective course provides the student with direct professional work experience in such areas as biotechnology, biomedical research, ecological assessment, wildlife biology, and science/nature education. Academic credit is based on a written technical report and an oral presentation. Writing enhanced. Prerequisites: Biology major, 6 hrs. of advanced biology, Junior standing, 3.0 GPA and approval of Department Chair. Credit 3.


Business Analysis Course Descriptions

  • BANA 2372 Business Analysis.

    An introduction to the use of quantitative business techniques. Topics include: organizing and presenting data, descriptive statistics, probability, discrete and continuous distributions, systems of equations, modeling, optimization procedures, and statistical inference. Prerequisite: MATH 1324. Credit 3. (Taught each semester.)

  • BANA 3363 Intermediate Business Analysis.

    A continuation of BANA 2372 and is designed to introduce the use of statistics as a business tool in the face of incomplete knowledge. Topics include: estimation, hypothesis testing, analysis of variance, goodness-of-fit measures, correlation, simple and multiple regression. Prerequisite: BANA 2372. Credit 3. (Taught each semester.)

  • BANA 3364 Operations Research.

    Quantitative methods used in the analysis of business problems. Topics include decision theory, linear programming, transportation and inventory models, Bayesian probability, and queuing theory. Prerequisite: BANA 2372. Credit 3.

  • BANA 4365 Introduction to Business Forecasting and Econometrics.

    The application of statistical methods for business and economic forecasting and for hypothesis testing, estimation, and analyzing economic data Prerequisite: ECON 2302 and ECON 2301, BANA 3363. Credit 3.


Career and Technology Course Descriptions

  • CATM 4360 Work-based Mentorship.

    Designed to provide students with the opportunity to gain specialized work-based experiences. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. May be repeated or taken concurrently to a maximum of 9 hours. Writing enhanced. Credit 1-9.


Chemistry Course Descriptions

  • NOTE: THEA requirements for mathematics courses listed as prerequisites for chemistry courses are published in the current schedule of classes. These requirements are in addition to any prerequisites listed below.
  • CHEM 1105 Chemistry in Context Laboratory.

    Laboratory for CHEM 1305. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 1305 is recommended. Credit 1.

  • CHEM 1305 Applying Chemistry to Society.

    Chemical phenomena, concepts and principles are explored within the context of the role of science and technology in society. A life-centered approach rather than a subject-centered one has been employed in the development of course curriculum. This course is specifically designed to satisfy the natural science core requirement of students who are not specializing in science. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 1105 is recommended. Credit 3.

  • CHEM 1406 Inorganic and Environmental Chemistry Lecture.

    The elements and their compounds are considered from a non-technical standpoint with emphasis placed on more familiar materials. This course is for non-science majors. Fall, Spring, Summer I. Credit 4.

  • CHEM 1407 Introductory Organic and Biochemistry Lecture.

    An orientation in organic chemistry is given in the first part of the course to allow treatment of the chemistry of nutrition and other biochemical aspects given in the last part. This course is for non-science majors. Prerequisite: CHEM 1406, CHEM 1411 or completion of a high school chemistry course. Fall, Spring, Summer II. Credit 4.

  • CHEM 1411 General Chemistry I.

    The following topics are studied: chemical changes and laws governing them; nomenclature; introduction to thermodynamics; reactions involving oxygen, hydrogen, acids, bases, and salts; ionization; metathesis; the periodic table, and atomic and molecular structure. This course is for chemistry and other science majors. Prerequisite: Minimum grade of C in MATH 1410, MATH 1314, MATH 1324 or MATH 2384 or equivalent, or a minimum Math score of 23 on the ACT or 560 on the SAT (or equivalent). Fall, Spring, Summer I. Credit 4.

  • CHEM 1412 General Chemistry II.

    Descriptive chemistry, gas laws, equilibria, kinetics, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and oxidation-reduction reactions are presented. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411. Fall, Spring, Summer II. Credit 4.

  • CHEM 2323 Organic Chemistry I: Lecture.

    A study of chemical bonding and structure of organic molecules is made. Functional group reactions and syntheses are emphasized. Reaction mechanisms, nomenclature and isomerism are studied. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411 and CHEM 1412. Fall, Spring, Summer I. Credit 3.

  • CHEM 2123 Organic Chemistry I: Laboratory.

    Laboratory for CHEM 2323. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, and prior credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 2323. Fall, Spring, Summer I. Credit 1.

  • CHEM 2325 Organic Chemistry II: Lecture.

    The general plan of CHEM 2323 is continued. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, and CHEM 2323. Fall, Spring, Summer II. Credit 3.

  • CHEM 2125 Organic Chemistry II: Laboratory.

    Laboratory for CHEM 2325. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, CHEM 2323/2123, and prior credit for or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 2325. Fall, Spring, Summer II. Credit 1.

  • CHEM 2401 Quantitative Analysis.

    The fundamental principles of quantitative analysis are emphasized. Acid-base, complexometric, precipitation, and redox titrations, solution equilibria and spectrophotometric analysis are discussed. Laboratory exercises involve all types of volumetric procedures and colorimetric analysis. Four-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411 and CHEM 1412. Fall, Spring. Credit 4.

  • CHEM 3339 Metabolism.

    This course is a study of the bioenergetics associated with the metabolic pathways and processes. The metabolism of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids; the interrelationship of the metabolic pathways; and the regulation of metabolism are emphasized. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, CHEM 2323/2123, CHEM 2325/2125, and CHEM 3438. Spring. Credit 3.

  • CHEM 3438 Introductory Biochemistry.

    The chemistry and functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, enzymes, nucleic acids and vitamins; enzyme kinetics; the processes of and mechanisms of digestion and absorption; and biological buffers are studied. Four-hour laboratory. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, CHEM 2323/2123, and CHEM 2325/2125. Fall. Credit 4.

  • CHEM 3361 Discoveries in Chemistry and Textiles.

    Attention will be focused on early scientists, the times in which they worked, important aspects of their efforts, and how their research continues to impact us today. Lectures will occur in the geographical areas where their work took place. Prerequisite: CHEM 1406 or CHEM 1411, junior standing, and permission of the instructor. Odd years during the Spring/Summer I break. Credit 3.

  • CHEM 3367 Introductory Inorganic Chemistry.

    General principles of inorganic chemistry are presented with a descriptive and practical rather than mathematical approach. Periodic relationships of elements and bonding, reactions and synthesis of inorganic compounds, acid-base chemistry are studied. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, and CHEM 2323/2123. Fall. Credit 3.

  • CHEM 3368 Environmental Chemistry.

    The chemical principles underlying the effects of air, water, and soil pollution are covered. Specific attention is paid to gas phase radical reactions, light absorption characteristics of atmospheric components, solution chemistry of fresh and salt water systems, and the mobility and chemistry of metal components of soil systems. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, CHEM 2401, CHEM 2323. and CHEM 2325 (or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 2325). Spring even years. Credit 3.

  • CHEM 4001 Directed Study in Chemistry.

    A directed study for undergraduates. This course is designed to allow independent study by advanced students. Instruction is on an individual basis. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 2325 and approval of department chair. Credit 1-3.

  • CHEM 4100 Chemical Literature Seminar.

    Methods of searching the literature in chemistry are presented. Emphasis is placed on the use of Chemical Abstracts, Beilstein, chemical patent literature, journals, and reference collections in the several specialties of chemistry. Prerequisite: Junior standing in chemistry. Fall, Spring. Credit 1.

  • CHEM 4260 Advanced Integrated Laboratory.

    This course will involve in-depth experiments that require the use of sophisticated synthetic and analytical procedures in the areas of organic, inorganic or analytical chemistry. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, CHEM 2323/2123, CHEM 2325/2125, CHEM 2401, and CHEM 4448. Spring. Credit 2.

  • CHEM 4440 Instrumental Analytical Chemistry.

    Spectrophotometry, separation techniques and mass spectrometry are discussed. Specific topics include the computer’s use in the modern laboratory, ultraviolet and visible absorption, atomic absorption, flame emission, and inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy, infrared absorption, and gas and liquid chromatography. Instruments for these techniques are used in the laboratory work. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, CHEM 2323/2123, CHEM 2325/2125. and CHEM 2401 and a minimum grade of C or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 4448. Four-hour laboratory. Fall. Credit 4.

  • CHEM 4441 Methods for Environmental and Industrial Analysis.

    This course covers the philosophy of modern instrumental methods used for environmental and industrial analyses. The topics to be covered include quality control and quality assurance good laboratory practices, waste minimization and elimination, safe laboratory operation, ISO standards, EPA methodology, and statistical data analysis. Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 2401, CHEM 2323, and CHEM 2325, and CHEM 3368. Spring. Credit 4.

  • CHEM 4442 Air Quality.

    An in-depth study of the sources of air pollution is made. Sampling procedures and the chemical analyses required for identification of pollutants are studied. Control methods for the restriction of air pollution are outlined. Four-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, CHEM 2401, CHEM 2323 and CHEM 2325. Spring odd years. Credit 4.

  • CHEM 4443 Structural Spectroscopic Methods.

    A survey of the spectroscopic and spectrometric methods for elucidation of structural information for chemical compounds with emphasis on the structural identification of unknowns. The methods of ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and both one- and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy will be covered. Their relative strengths, complementary nature, and utility will be discussed. The focus will be the determination of chemical structures by spectroscopic/spectrometric methods. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, CHEM 2323/2123, and CHEM 2325/2125. Spring even years. Credit 4.

  • CHEM 4448 Physical Chemistry I.

    The foundations of thermodynamics and spectroscopic methods (radio-frequency, microwave, infrared, Raman, UV-visible, and X-ray) are developed from first principals with an atomistic point of view. Four-hour laboratory. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, CHEM 2323/2123, CHEM 2325/2125, MATH 1420, MATH 1430, and one year of physics. Fall. Credit 4.

  • CHEM 4449 Physical Chemistry II.

    The developments of thermochemistry, phase diagrams, equilibria, and kinetics are traced from the statistical mechanics of quantum states to the macroscopic observations of thermodynamics. Four-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, CHEM 2323/2123, CHEM 2325/2125, MATH 1420, MATH 1430, one year of physics and CHEM 4448. Spring. Credit 4.

  • CHEM 4367 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry.

    Properties of atoms and ions, bonding theory and structure, acid-base theory, reactions of inorganic compounds, nonaqueous solvents, and coordination chemistry are studied. Emphasis is on the underlying theoretical concepts involved. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, CHEM 2323/2123, CHEM 2325/2125 and CHEM 4448. Spring. Credit 3.

  • CHEM 4380 Forensic Chemistry.

    This is a one semester course focused on surveying important aspects of chemistry to forensic inquiries. Focus will be on the validity of results. Techniques and methods for selecting proper techniques to answer various questions will be discussed. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, CHEM 2323/2123, CHEM 2325/2125, CHEM 4440, CHEM 4448, and CHEM 4367 (or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 4367); MATH 1420, MATH 1430, Spring. Credit 3.

  • CHEM 4395 Undergraduate Research in Chemistry.

    This course acquaints the senior student with techniques used in simple research problems. Prerequisite: student must have a minimum of 20 semester hours in chemistry and consent of the Department Chair. May be repeated for an additional three semester hours by those students having a definite project to complete. This course may be taken for Academic Distinction credit. See Academic Distinction Program in this catalog. Credit 3.


Communication Studies Course Descriptions

  • COMS 1331 Introduction to Human Communication.

    A survey of the communication studies field. Students will be introduced to the basic principles, concepts, and modes of human communication in the contemporary world through class activities, projects, and lectures. Designed for non-majors. Credit 3.

  • COMS 1361 Public Speaking.

    An introductory course in research, composition, organization, and delivery of informative and persuasive speeches for various purposes and occasions. Includes strategies for reducing speaker apprehension. Credit 3.

  • COMS 2331 Introduction to Communication Theory and Research.

    An introduction to theory and research in the field of communication with an emphasis on interpersonal and family communication. Students prepare reviews of literature as well as scholarly abstracts. Credit 3.

  • COMS 2382 Communication for Business and the Professions.

    This course examines theory and research in interpersonal principles, leadership strategies, listening, and nonverbal communication. Emphasis is on the application of this knowledge to develop communication skills in settings such as interviewing, group decision-making, speech preparation and presentation. Not for Communication Studies majors, minors, or specializations. Credit 3.

  • COMS 2384 Argumentation and Debate.

    A study of argumentation as a type of discourse and an instrument of critical decision making. Instruction and public practice in research, analysis, organization, use of evidence, refutation, and delivery. Prerequisite: COMS 1361 or permission of the Chair. Credit 3.

  • COMS 2385 Community Applied Communication.

    Recommendations are made for improving student communication with people from differing backgrounds in community organizations. Students will work with such an organization throughout the semester for a minimum of 20 total hours over at least six visits to the service-learning site. A list of organizations is provided in class. Credit 3.

  • COMS 2386 Interpersonal Communication.

    Theory and research in one-to-one communication in relationships. Topics include perception, listening, conflict management, and the development and maintenance of relationships. Credit 3.

  • COMS 2390 Multimedia Communication.

    Applications of technology to the preparation and presentation of speeches and other forms of oral discourse. Credit 3.

  • COMS 3365 Humor in Communication.

    This course examines how humor functions across a variety of contexts, including interpersonal, organizational, public, and political. It is based on theory, research, and practical application. Credit 3.

  • COMS 3370 Intercultural Communication.

    A study of the theory, research, and practice of communicating within and across cultures. Research in intercultural communication will be studied with an emphasis on application to the student’s own intercultural communication. Credit 3.

  • COMS 3371 Conflict, Negotiation, and Resolution.

    Explores the complexities of conflict in order to understand the forces that make conflict challenging and to develop a repertoire of skills for thinking about and managing conflict more effectively in a variety of close relationship contexts.  Credit 3.

  • COMS 3372 Interpersonal Health Communication.

    This course examines patient and physician communication skills, communicating social support for those with serious illnesses, survivorship, identity issues, media influence, and e-health across a wide range of communication contexts. These include family, culture, and computer-mediated communication. The course uses a lecture/discussion format. Credit 3.

  • COMS 3381 Great American Speeches.

    A critical study of modern social movements and campaigns through analysis of speakers and speeches, 1900-2000. Credit 3.

  • COMS 3382 Persuasion.

    A study of the principles of attitude change and theories of persuasion as they apply to the speaker, political campaigns, and social movements. Fall. Credit 3.

  • COMS 3383 Small Group Communication.

    An examination and application of the research, theories, and practices of interaction, leadership, and problem-solving in formal and informal small group settings. Prerequisite: COMS 2386 or COMS 3384. Spring. Credit 3.

  • COMS 3384 Speech for Teachers.

    Designed primarily for prospective teachers, this course focuses on the research, theory, and practice of communication in classrooms as well as other instructional settings. Students will organize and present formal and instructional presentations in simulated classroom situations. Limited to juniors and seniors. Not for Communications Studies majors except those seeking teacher certification. Credit 3.

  • COMS 3390 Human Communication in Virtual Organizations.

    Analyzes the impact of human communication technology on organizations of all types, including political, social, religious, and educational institutions.  The course will examine how communication technologies shape organizations, channel power, manage crisis, establish leadership, and redefine privacy and freedom of expression.  Prerequisite:  Sophomore standing and 12 hours of communications studies courses.  Credit 3.

  • COMS 4365 Nonverbal Communication.

    The study of systems of nonverbal communication and their effective use, including body language, vocalic, facial, and spatial communication. Students will apply current theory and research in nonverbal communication to their own communication. Credit 3.

  • COMS 4366 Deceptive Communication.

    An in-depth study of lying and other forms of deception in a variety of communication contexts, including interpersonal, public, and legal.  Designed to provide empirical, ethical, and critical understanding of deception to aid students in assessing their own messages and the messages of others.  Prerequisite: at least sophomore standing.  Credit 3.

  • COMS 4378 Internship in Communication Studies.

    An on-the-job application of skills and theories learned in the classroom for selected individual students who have completed their junior year. Internships are with public relations and governmental agencies, businesses and non-profit organizations. Prerequisites: At least junior standing, 12 COMS hours completed, and approval of the Chair. Credit 3.

  • COMS 4381 Communication Theory.

    survey of contemporary theories of communication. Prerequisite: 12 hours COMS completed. Credit 3.

  • COMS 4382 Applied Rhetorical Theory.

    A study of the major theories of rhetorical analysis from ancient times to the present with basic applications to American public communication. The course also presents non-American and non-traditional rhetorical methodology. The student will be required to apply the various paradigms in analyzing communication artifacts past and present. Prerequisite: 12 COMS hours completed. Spring. Credit 3.

  • COMS 4385 Professional Communication Developent.

    This course will strengthen development of communication skills required for professionals working in complex organizations, especially non-profit and community organizations. Each student will be assigned to work with a community organizational leader throughout the semester who will provide individual assessments and feedback. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Credit 3.

  • COMS 4386 Family Communication.

    An intensive examination of interpersonal communication at all levels in the context of families. Students pursue original research projects, reviews of literature, and annotated bibliographies. Prerequisite: COMS 2386. Credit 3.

  • COMS 4387 Relationship Communication.

    This course explores communication as it occurs in various types of personal relationships, with a special focus on romantic relationships and close friendships. Emerging contexts for such relationships, such as long-distance and mediated forms, are included as are suggestions for enhancing the quality of communication and satisfaction within them. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Credit 3.

  • COMS 4391 Undergraduate Seminar in Communication Studies.

    This course allows a student to pursue particular problems or issues beyond the limits of current course offerings. The problem or issue, however, will be within the student’s area of specialization. This course may be taken for Academic Distinction credit. See Academic Distinction Program in this catalog. Prerequisite: 12 hours COM COMS completed and approval of the Chair. May be repeated for credit.  Credit 3.

  • COMS 4392 Seminar in Communication Studies.

    This course provides students an opportunity to study new areas of scholarship in communication and special interest topics offered on a rotating basis.  Prerequisite:  Sophomore standing.  Credit 3.


Human Services Minor Course Descriptions

  • COUN 3321 Introduction to the Helping Relationship.

    This course will provide an introduction to the helping relationship, especially as it relates to educational and community settings. Students will be challenged to consider their motivations, needs, and goals related to the art of helping. Students will engage in a service learning project as part of exploring the nature of the helping relationship. Students will also be introduced to basic attitudes, dispositions and skills needed for helping relationships and counseling. Credit 3.

  • COUN 3322 Career Development.

    This course will help students explore a lifelong plan for career development. Students will use real life assessments to determine aptitudes, interests and values related to careers. Students will learn how to utilize on campus and internet resources to develop resumes, portfolios and practice job interviewing skills. Activities in this course are designed to give students an advantage for entering the job market. Credit 3.

  • COUN 3331 Introduction to Principles of Counseling.

    This course will provide students with an overview of the counseling profession to include professional issues, ethics, history, credentialing, professional associations, and roles of counselors in various settings. Emphasis is placed on the development of professional identity, the value of the counseling relationship, and theory. Students will choose from several activities allowing them to recognize the value of counseling in human service activities. Credit 3.

  • COUN 3332 Therapeutic Play Skills.

    Participants will learn the basic principles that guide child-centered play sessions via didactic and experiential activities. The course will help students understand how child-centered play sessions facilitate the recognition and expression of feelings in children, as well as strengthen problem-solving skills, pro-social skills, and engagement with parents. Students will role-play facilitative skills including recognizing and responding to children's feelings, play session limit setting, and building children's self-esteem. Students will have opportunities to observe live and video taped child-centered play sessions. Credit 3.

  • COUN 4387 Workshop in Counseling and Human Services.

    This workshop course will allow the undergraduate student to conduct in-depth study in a specific topic area related to counseling and human services. Topics will vary as needs demand. May be repeated as scheduled topics vary. Credit 3.


Computer Science Course Descriptions

  • CSTE 1330 Introduction to Computers.

    This is a computer literacy course. Basic computing concepts are presented. Assignments provide a hands-on experience in using microcomputer applications. Multimedia and the Internet are introduced. May not be taken for credit toward aCOSC major or minor. This course may be taken as a classroom based course or as an Independent Study/Internet course. Credit 3.

  • CSTE 2330 Multimedia Technologies.

    This course examines the use of modern multimedia tools in the production foof professional communication materials. The course specifically examines multi-platform image, sound and video editing tools, CD/DVD, wiki and podcast production tools as well as supporting web-publishing tools and scripting techniques for the purpose of enriching the professional communication environment. May not be taken for credit toward a COSC major or minor. Credit 3.

  • CSTE 3330 Web Technologies.

    This course explores the concepts and techniques associated with the development of modern dynamic Web sites. Topics covered include web design fundamentals, modern web development tools, style sheets, markup languages, accessibility, session management, interactive communication and security. The course also examines a number of Web 2.0 technologies that support blog, wiki and social networking applications. Prerequisite: CSCTE 2330. Credit 3.

  • COSC 1436 Programming Fundamentals I.

    This course is an introduction to programming. Topics include fundamental concepts of computer programming and software development methodology, including data types, control structures, functions, arrays, and the mechanics of programming running, testing, and debugging. The development of procedures and the writing and testing of programs to implement them are emphasized. This course includes a 2-hour lab-based component. This course assumes a general familiarity with computers. Prerequisites: eligibility for MATH 1316, MATH 1324, MATH 2312, or MATH 2413. Credit 4.

  • COSC 1437 Programming Fundamentals II.

    This course is a continuation of COSC 1436 and emphasizes the relationships between the data objects in computer programs. The use of control structures and data types is reviewed, with emphasis on structured data types. An object-oriented programming paradigm is used, focusing on the definition and use of classes along with the fundamentals of object-oriented design. The course includes basic analysis of algorithms, searching and sorting techniques, and an introduction to software engineering. This course includes a 2-hour lab-based component. Prerequisites: COSC 1436; MATH 1324, MATH 1316, or MATH 2413. Credit 4.

  • CSTE 1331 Visual Programming.

    This course is an introduction to programming using the visual paradigm, aimed at students with little or no background in programming. The core notions of problem solving through programming are introduced, following an object-oriented approach to visual programming. Credit 3.

  • COSC 2327 Networks I.

    The course covers the hardware components of computer networks, an introduction to internetworking, local and wide area networks, as well as OSI and TCP/IP models, basic networking protocols and the development of client/server applications. Prerequisite: COSC 1436. Credit 3.

  • COSC 2329 Computer Organization and Machine Language.

    An introduction to instruction set architectures, emphasizing central processor organization and operations. Specific topics include data representations, register architectures, addressing modes, the fetch/ execute cycle; interrupts, subprogram calls, I/O services, digital logic gates and basic Boolean algebra, and sequential and combinational circuits. Programs will be assigned in a representative assembly language to explore these areas. Prerequisite: COSC 1436, COSC 1437 (may be taken concurrently). Credit 3.

  • COSC 2347 Special Topics/Programming.

    In-depth study of a programming language used to implement information systems. Real time components, visual techniques, and artificial intelligence will be utilized as appropriate. This course may be repeated for credit with the approval of the undergraduate advisor. A different language must be covered to receive approval for repeat credit. Prerequisite: COSC 1437. Credit 3.

  • COSC 3312 Numerical Methods.

    This course develops the concepts underlying the use of the computer for interpolation, approximations, solutions of equations and the solution of both linear and nonlinear systems equations. Mathematical software and/or user written programs are utilized. Also offered as MATH 3394. Prerequisites: COSC 1437 and MATH 1430 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

  • COSC 3318 Data Base Management Systems.

    This course emphasizes the design of information systems using database software and query language/programming interfaces. Data warehouse concepts are introduced. Legacy systems, LAN and distributed systems based systems are used to give the student hands-on experience in systems development. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: COSC 1437. Credit 3.

  • COSC 3319 Data Structures and Algorithms.

    Introductory treatments of such topics as orthogonal lists, strings, arrays, linked lists, multilinked structures, indexed and direct files, and generalized data management and database management systems. Prerequisites: COSC 1437, MATH 2399 or MATH 2414. Credit 3.

  • COSC 3321 Digital System Design.

    This course is an introduction to Boolean Algebra and graph theory with emphasis on their applications in the design of digital computer software and hardware. Logic systems are designed and analyzed. Prerequisite: COSC 2329 and COSC 2329. Credit 3.

  • COSC 3327 Computer Architecture.

    This course is a continuation of COSC 2329, exploring computer organization and architectures in more depth and breadth. Specific topics include milestones in the philosophy of computer design, Karnaugh maps for circuit minimization, memory types and organization, caching, pipelining, micro-architectures, parallel architectures, I/O devices, buses and bus protocols. Throughout the course, physical and performance considerations will be stressed along with the hardware's interaction with operating systems. Prerequisite: COSC 2329. Credit 3.

  • COSC 3331 Human-Computer Interaction.

    This course presents a comprehensive introduction to the principles and techniques of human-computer interaction. The course examines the event-driven model through the development of applications utilizing graphical design environments and the use of rapid application prototyping to explore a variety of techniques for HCI, particularly in relation to mobile and other non-traditional devices. Prerequisite: COSC 1437. Credit 3.

  • COSC 3332 Game Programming and Design.

    This course allows those students who desire to learn more about game programming to apply what they have learned in their foundation courses in that area. Gaming is a compelling way to motivate students to learn challenging technical concepts such as programming, software engineering, algorithms, and project management. Prerequisite:COSC 2329. Credit 3

  • COSC 3337 Information Systems Design and Management.

    This is a course in the design and implementation of large-scale file and persistent object-based information systems. Client/server systems are covered. Prerequisite: COSC 2347 (COBOL). Credit 3.

  • COSC 4316 Computer Design and Construction.

    This course deals with the design and implementation of assemblers, interpreters and compilers. Topics include symbol tables, lexical scanning, syntactic analysis, object code generation and storage allocation. Programming assignments will involve implementation of functional components of a translator. Prerequisites: COSC 2329 and COSC 3319. Credit 3.

  • COSC 4318 Programming Languages.

    This course emphasizes programming languages which support the Object-Oriented Programming (OOP) paradigm. Programming assignments are used to illustrate the features and weaknesses of the language and to develop the student’s proficiency in the use of OOP technology. Prerequisite: COSC 1437. Credit 3.

  • COSC 4319 Software Engineering.

    This course is an introduction to formal methods of specifying, designing, implementing and testing software for large programming projects. Methods of estimating and predicting reliability are discussed. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: 3 hours of advanced COSC and COSC 3318. Credit 3.

  • COSC 4320 System Modeling and Simulation.

    This is an introduction to modeling and simulation for analysis of computer software and hardware. Application of simulation analysis to design and development of computer software and systems including modeling of computer and software components will be discussed. Design, coding and use of discrete event simulation software will be covered. Prerequisite: Six advanced hours of COSC and 3379. Credit 3.

  • COSC 4326 Networks Theory.

    This course examines the theoretical basis for data communication together with an examination of the structures and protocols associated with the control of error, congestion and routing. The course includes an examination of network administration fundamentals and socket programming in client-server applications. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: COSC 2327 and 6 advanced hours of COSC. Credit 3.

  • COSC 4327 Computer Operating Systems.

    This course is concerned with software organization of computer systems. It is intended to bring together the concepts and techniques of programming languages, data structures and computer organization by considering their role in the design of general computer systems. The problems which arise in multi-accessing, multiprogramming, and multiprocessing are emphasized. Prerequisites: COSC 3327 and COSC 3319. Credit 3.

  • COSC 4330 Computer Graphics.

    This course introduces graphical API’s used in developing graphical user interfaces and multimedia applications. Topics covered are selected from the PHIGS, Windows, Presentation Manager, X-Windows, digital video and other appropriate technologies. Prerequisite: 6 advanced hours of COSC. Credit 3.

  • COSC 4340 Special Topics in Computer Science.

    Topics of general interest are offered on a timely basis. Previous topics include Cognitive Computing, Embedded Linux Systems, Visual Graphics/Component Systems. Prerequisites: For all COSC 4340 topics, 6 hrs. advanced COSC. Credit 1-3.

  • COSC 4349 Professionalism and Ethics in Digital Forensics.

    This course examines the nature, need, and value of well-formed ethical constructs. Topics include ethical theory and how different ethical theories can be applied to situations involving existing and emerging technologies. The course will include class discussions, through case studies, of the nature of professionalism, personal and professional codes of ethics and conduct, and the professional handling of ethical and moral conflict. The course also explores the role of the professional in public policy and the awareness of consequences of ethical dissent and whistle blowing. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: Senior classification with 6 hours advanced COSC or DFSC courses. Credit 3.

  • DFSC 1317 Introduction to Digital Forensics and Information Assurance.

    This course introduces students to the fundamentals of digital forensics technology. Emphasis is placed on identifying threats to, and vulnerabilities of, computer systems and how to minimize them. Students will learn how hackers identify victims, how attacks are executed, and various methods used to access to computer systems. Credit 3.

  • DFSC 2XXX Special Topics.

    Topics of general interest are offered on a timely basis. Prerequisites: For all DFSC 1317 topics, DFSC 1317 . Credit 1-3.

  • DFSC 2320 Hardware Forensics.

    Techniques in the duplication, recovery and restoration of digital evidence. Includes hard disks, floppy drives, CD formats, DVD formats, zip drives, mobile phones, PDA’s smart cards, memory technologies, and other devices capable of storing digital information. Prerequisite: DFSC 1317. Credit 3.

  • DFSC 2317 Network Security.

    The rationale and necessity for securing computer systems and data networks, as well as methodologies for the design of security systems, establishing security protocols and the identification of best practices in the administration, testing and response protocols for secure communications systems. Prerequisite: DFSC 1317. Credit 3.

  • DFSC 3320 Digital Forensics Tools.

    This course explores tools for the recovery of information on protected or damaged hardware for the purpose of providing evidence of misuse or abuse of systems. Topics also include the chain of evidence, protocols for data recovery, cryptographic analysis, password recovery, the bypassing of specific target operating systems, and obtaining data from digital devices that have been damaged or destroyed. Prerequisite: DFSC 1317. Credit 3.

  • DFSC 3317 Cryptography.

    This course will describe the basic principles of cryptography and how it is used in modern computer and communication systems. It will cover single ciphers, modern ciphers, public-key cryptography, key management, cryptanalysis and steganography. Students will learn how cryptography is used for message secrecy, integrity, authentication and digital signatures. Application areas to be discussed include e-mail, files, network communication, and electronic payments. Prerequisite: DFSC 1317. Credit 3.

  • DFSC 4340 Special Topics in Digital Forensics.

    Topics of general interest are offered on a timely basis. Previous topics include DC3 Challenge. Prerequisites: For all DFSC 4340 topics, 6 hrs. advanced DFSC. Credit 1-3.

  • DFSC 4317 Information Security.

    This course provides an introduction to basic security needs. The course will include, but not be limited to individuals vs. government privacy issues, federal encryption standards, the different layers of security currently available, the practical application of user level and system level cryptography, and strategies for evaluation and selection of security methods. Prerequisite: DFSC 2317 and 3 ADV DFSC hours. Credit 3.


Criminal Justice Course Descriptions

  • CRIJ 2361 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System

    . An introductory course designed to familiarize students with the facets of the criminal justice system, the sub-systems and how they interrelate, processing of offenders, punishment and its alternatives, and the future of the criminal justice system. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 2362 Criminology

    . Crime as a form of deviant behavior; nature and extent of crime; past and present theories; evaluation of prevention, control, and treatment programs. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 2364 Fundamentals of Criminal Law.

    A course in substantive criminal law which includes definition of law, definition of crime, general principles of criminal responsibility, elements of the major crimes, punishments, conditions or circumstances which may excuse from criminal responsibility or mitigate punishment, the court system of Texas and the United States, basic concepts of criminal law with emphasis on the penal law of the State of Texas. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 2365 Correctional Systems and Practices.

    Analysis and evaluation of contemporary correctional systems; discussion of recent research concerning the correctional institution and the various field services. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 2367 Police Systems and Practices.

    Philosophy and history of law enforcement; limitations imposed on law enforcement in a democratic society in accordance with the Constitution; agencies of law enforcement; role and place of law enforcement in the total justice process. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 2368 Criminal Investigation.

    This course provides a brief overview of scientific crime detection and more detailed discussion of techniques for case management and documentation, the concept of proof, the impact of emergent technology on the investigative process, interacting with victims and witnesses, and interviewing suspects. Particular emphasis may be placed on the investigation of particular types of crimes, for example, homicides, sex offenses, child abuse, hate crimes, and so forth. Prerequisite: CRIJ 2367 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 2394 The Courts and Criminal Procedure.

    Examines procedural requirements for judicial processing of criminal offenders. Examines concepts of evidence sufficiency, standards of proof, due process, and constitutional safeguards. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 3339 History of the Criminal Justice System.

    A study of the major social, economic, legal and political events which have contributed to the formation of the American Criminal Justice System. Emphasis is on the common roots of the different components of the present system. Prerequisite: CRIJ 2361. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 3340 Gender and Crime.

    The course investigates definitions of gender and gender roles and how gender impacts offending, victimization, and criminal justice processing. This course also evaluates the influence of gender on working in criminal justice as professionals. Criminological theories are evaluated in light of gender and the relationship between gender and criminal justice. Prerequisites: CRIJ 2361, CRIJ 2362. Credits 3.

  • CRIJ 3341 Aging, Crime, and Victimization.

    This course combines a general education about aging in America with information about senior adults as crime victims, criminals or prison inmates. Future directions for public policy related to crime and aging are also evaluated. Prerequisites: CRIJ 2361, CRIJ 2362.

  • CRIJ 3350 Victimology.

    Survey of the literature, research and current trends concerning the victim in the criminal justice system; particular attention is given tot he victim rights and compensation, fear of crime measuring victimization, and the impact of victimization on the individual.

  • CRIJ 3361 Comparative Criminal Justice Systems.

    The study of criminal justice in societies other than the United States including, but not limited to, the European region, the Asian region, and the African region. Emphasis is on the uncommon roots of criminal justice in these regions and the effectiveness of such systems in responding to criminal behavior. Prerequisites: CRIJ 2361 and CRIJ 2362. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 3362 White Collar Crime.

    The study of the ideas and perspectives that are dominant in the field of white-collar crime. Topics such as organizational crime, occupational crime, legislation aimed at white collar crime, law enforcement, causes of white collar crime, and possible forms of intervention will be discussed. Prerequisites: CRIJ 2361 and CRIJ 2362. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 3363 Violent Offenders.

    This course provides an introduction to psychological issues relating to understanding, assessing, managing criminal and other abnormal behavior. An overview of mental disorders and their relationship to criminality and violence is provided. Topics include sanity, psychopathy, criminal profiling, serial killers, stalking, women who kill, and threat assessment. Prerequisite: CRIJ 2361 or CRIJ 2362. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 3364 Special Offenders and Special Needs.

    The identification and study of special or unusual offenders with special or unusual needs. Special offenders include those which rarely are covered in standard criminology classes, such as wildlife poachers, serial killers, computer hackers, substance abusers, and business and professional scam artists. Prerequisites: CRIJ 2361 and CRIJ 2362.

  • CRIJ 3368 Understanding Sexual Offending.

    This course provides an overview of the sexual offender. The origins and various motivations for sexual offending are explored as are treatment strategies and their relative effectiveness with different offender groups. Various approaches to community supervision are examined as are controversial issues such as castration of sex offenders. Prerequisite: CRIJ 2361 or CRIJ 2362. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 3378 Introduction to Methods of Research.

    Methods and techniques of research in the behavioral sciences; historical development of psychological and social research; techniques and problems. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 3394 Global Terrorism and Homeland Security.

    This course provides an overview of the field of terrorism. Using a multi-dimensional approach that draws from international relations, law, and police strategies, the course emphasizes research and analysis. Students also gain the ability to examine and scrutinize international strategies aimed at reducing terrorist incidents. Prerequisite: CRIJ 2361 or CRIJ 2362. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 3396 Juvenile Delinquency and Juvenile Justice.

    Nature and extent of delinquency, explanatory models and theories: the juvenile justice system; history, philosophy, and evaluation of the juvenile court, juvenile court practices and procedures; the role of the police officer and the correctional officer. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 4330 Law and Society

    . The nature, functions, limitations and objectives of law; civil procedure; civil law and selected social problems, for example abortion, euthanasia; the civil courts; the grand jury and petit jury; torts; civil liability for police and correctional officers; family law. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 4332 Legal Aspects of Corrections.

    Legal problems from conviction to release; pre-sentence investigations, sentencing, probation and parole; incarceration; loss and restoration of civil rights. Emphasis on practical legal problems confronting the probation and parole office and the correctional administrator. Credit 3.

  • CJ 436 CRIJ 4336 Understanding Human Behavior.

    The dynamics of human behavior; analysis of the biological, cultural, sociological and psychological factors. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 4338 Child Abuse and Neglect.

    Students will develop knowledge concerning key concepts and terminology related to child abuse and neglect, related laws and court procedures, ways to address and investigate cases, and programs available to assist in the prevention of child abuse and neglect, as well as programs designed to protect children. This course will also provide a foundation for students who may enter professional careers that place them in a position to address and/or investigate suspected cases of child abuse and neglect.

  • CRIJ 4360 Crime and the Media.

    This course surveys the connections between the mass media, crime, and criminal justice. It explores how the criminal justice system, criminals, and crime are portrayed in film, TV drama and news media and examines how the media reflect our collective perceptions of crime, violence and victimization and shape attitudes toward crime. Prerequisites: CRIJ 2361, CRIJ 2362. Credits 3.

  • CRIJ 4362 Substance Use and Abuse.

    The description, classification, and analysis of the extent of the drug problem. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 4363 Cybercrime.

    This seminar focuses on topics related to cybercrime, including legal, enforcement, behavioral, and social factors that influence its perpetration, prevention, and prosecution. Prerequisites: Junior/Senior standing. Credit: 3.

  • CRIJ 4365 Professionalism and Ethics in Criminal Justice.

    The study of theories and practices in areas of legality, morality, values and ethics as they pertain to criminal justice. Included will be such topics as police corruption, brutality, and methods of dealing with such practices, as well as the concept of profession and professional conduct. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 4367 Correctional Strategies.

    This course examines treatment options in both institutional and field corrections settings.  There is a focus upon special populations, including mental health populations and their treatment, aging in prison, women, HIV populations, and issues surrounding race and ethnicity.  Prerequisite:  Junior Standing and CRIJ 2365.  Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 4368 Global Organized Crime.

    Historical survey of organized crime in America, areas of influence, remedial practices and control. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 4370 Interviewing and Counseling.

    Counseling psychology with emphasis on principals and procedures; the theoretical foundations of therapeutic psychology; therapeutic techniques and therapeutic process. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 4373 Undergraduate Internship in Criminal Justice.

    A minimum of three months in an approved criminal justice or social agency setting taken preferably between junior and senior years. Designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply academic learning in practical situations. See the College’s Internship Coordinator for details about this program. Credit 9.

  • CRIJ 4376 Readings and Independent Studies in Criminal Justice.

    Designed for advanced students in the behavioral sciences who are capable of independent study. Registration upon approval of the appropriate Assistant Dean of the College of Criminal Justice and the instructor directing the course. Credit to be arranged.

  • CRIJ 4377 Special Topics in Criminal Justice.

    Designed to give the advanced undergraduate student academic flexibility. May be repeated for credit. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 4380 Victimology.

    Survey of the literature, research and current trends concerning the victim in the criminal justice system; particular attention is given to the victim rights and compensation, fear of crime measuring victimization, and the impact of victimization on the individual. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 4382 Social Deviance.

    The psychological and sociological aspects of socially deviant behavior; theoretical overviews and implications for social control and social policy. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 4383 Family Violence.

    The course will address the theoretical issues, both past and present, regarding family violence in order to provide the student with an understanding of the salient issues. In addition, attention will be given to the impact family violence has on the victim and society, legal aspects of family violence, key factors associated with recognition of family violence (especially child abuse), and pertinent research focusing on the subject. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 4384 Police Strategies.

    Analysis of police policies with particular attention to the current major problem areas from the point of view of both the administrator and the line operations officer. Integration of established scientific knowledge with practical police experience in the various areas of police functioning. Prerequisite: CRIJ 2367. Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 4385 Crime, Justice and Social Diversity.

    This course is the study of how social diversity and inequality shape the way criminal behavior is defined and controlled through the application of the criminal law and criminal justice system.  Attention is given to the disparity of criminal offending, victimization, and criminal justice processing across demographic groups as well as explanations for observed disparities.  The course also explores subordinate group members as criminal justice professionals. Prerequisite: CRIJ 2361, CRIJ 2362, CRIJ 3378.  Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 4386 Problem Analysis in Criminal Justice.

    This course serves as a capstone for the Criminal Justice undergraduate student.  Students will use skills and knowledge from prior courses to address challenges facing the criminal justice system.  The class will focus on application of research skills and analytic techniques to address these issues.  Prerequisite:  Senior Standing, CRIJ 3378 and STAT 3379 or equivalent.  Credit 3.

  • CRIJ 4394 Constitutional Issues in Law Enforcement.

    The course focus is the intersection of the U.S. Constitution and the criminal justice system.  Major decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court serve as the core resource, including those addressing Fourth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendment governmental authority issues.  Emphasis is placed on development of analytical reasoning skills through the case study method.  Prerequisite: Junior Standing and CRIJ 2364.  Credits 3.


Dance Course Descriptions

  • DANC 1101 Dance Workshop.

    This is a practical workshop in support of Dance Program concerts and activities. Duties include costume construction, backstage and front of house support, and audio/ video recording and dubbing. Special seminars in areas such as diet and health, auditioning and career opportunities and options are also addressed. Credit 1.

  • DNC 121Non-majors Ballet.

    This course introduces the theory and practice of ballet.  No previous experience in dance is required. Credit 2. *Pending approval by University Curriculum Committee

  • DNC 122 Non-majors Modern.

    This course introduces concepts of modern dance and gives students practice in self expression through movement. No prior experience in dance is required. Credit 2. *Pending approval by University Curriculum Committee

  • DNC 123 Introduction to Jazz.

    This course introduces students to the dance vocabulary and movement of jazz technique.  No prior dance experience is required.  Credit 2. *Pending approval by University Curriculum Committee

  • DANC 1204 Folk Dance Forms. [DANC 1222]

    Dances indigenous to Europe, Mexico and the United States are studied in relation to their cultural derivations. Special consideration is given to dance as a cultural and recreational activity. Credit 2.

  • DANC 1206 Theatre Dance Forms.

    Specific theatrical dance forms such as ballet, jazz, modern dance, and Hip Hop are studied in specially dedicated sections. Credit 2.

  • DNC 128 Beginning Tap.

    In this course, tap technique is introduced and practiced. No prior dance experience is expected. Credit 2. *Pending approval by University Curriculum Committee

  • DNC 129 Non-majors Hip-hop.

    This course gives students practice in forms of hip hop dancing.  No previous experience is required.  Credit 2. *Pending approval by University Curriculum Committee

  • DNC 133  Fundamentals of Ballet.

    This course establishes the fundamentals of ballet, including alignment, technique, and vocabulary.  It is designed for students admitted to the dance program, and theatre and musical theater majors. *Pending approval by University Curriculum Committee

  • DNC 134 Fundamentals of Modern.

    This course introduces the concepts and practices of modern dance technique. It presumes no previous modern dance training, but requires acceptance into the dance, theater, or musical theater program. Credit 3. *Pending approval by University Curriculum Committee

  • DANC 1372 Dance as Art. [DANC 2303]

    This course is a video survey of the vast range of theatrical dance that has taken place in the twentieth century. Forms and styles covered include ballet, modern/postmodern, jazz, musical theater, tap, contemporary dance, and dance for music video. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

  • DNC 223 Jazz II.

    This course expands on the basic dance vocabulary and movements offered in DNC 123, Introduction to Jazz.  Students should have basic experience in jazz dance. Credit 2. *Pending approval by University Curriculum Committee

  • DANC 2332 Social and Folk Dance Forms.

    Social and folk dance forms of ethnic and social significance are studied and performed in relation to their cultural derivations and historical perspectives and their use in period theatrical/concert production. Special emphasis is placed upon the importance of ethnic art forms to contemporary society. Credit 3.

  • DANC 2333 Beginning Ballet Technique.

    This is a ballet technique class designed for incoming dance majors. It presumes no former ballet training but requires well-developed movement skills. Students who are not dance-majors must have permission of instructor or program coordinator to register. May be repeated for credit. Credit 3.

  • DANC 2334 Beginning Modern Dance Technique.

    This is a modern dance technique class designed for incoming dance majors. It presumes no former modern dance training but requires well developed movement skills. Students who are not dance-majors must have permission of instructor or program coordinator to register. May be repeated for credit. Credit 3.

  • DANC 2372 History and Philosophy of Dance: 1700 to the Present.

    A chronological survey is made of the history of dance from the 1700’s to the modern period. Special emphasis is placed on the philosophic relationship of dance to the various cultural epochs. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

  • DANC 2373 World Dance: Exploring Cultures Through the Dance Experience.

    In this course, students re immersed in the dances of one world region for half a semester, and of another world region for the other half semester. Although comparisons between two cultures will become evident, the primary objective of the course is to expose the student to two different dance styles and to use dance analysis to identify and study cultural characteristics. Guest artists lead classes and demonstrations, which include live music, costumes, and terminology. Each time the course is offered, a different set of cultures is examined. Prerequisites: Junior level standing or permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

  • DANC 2376 Choreography I.

    The student learns to analyze the various components of design and to create basic dance studies which demonstrate understanding of dance as a craft and as an art. Prerequisites: DNC 176. A minimum of intermediate standing in ballet or modern dance, or permission of the instructor is required to register for this course. Credit 3.

  • DANC 3333 Intermediate Ballet Technique.

    This is an intermediate level ballet technique class which presumes substantial exposure to ballet dance training. Open by audition only. Prerequisite: DANC 2333 or permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

  • DANC 3334 Intermediate Modern Dance Technique.

    This is an intermediate level modern dance technique class which presumes substantial exposure to modern dance training. Open by audition only. Prerequisite: DANC 2334 or permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

  • DNC 335 Jazz III.

    Intermediate Jazz dance is designed for the dancer with sound foundations in jazz technique.    The course will focus on developing technical skills, increasing strength and flexibility, and developing performance quality in jazz dance. Credit 3. *Pending approval by University Curriculum Committee

  • DANC 3373 Laban Movement Analysis.

    This course provides an overview of Laban Movement Analysis emphasizing the areas of Body, Effort, Shape, Space, and components necessary to understand and support non verbal communication. Theory, supported by experiential activities, provides the student the opportunity to better understand human movement as well as a means of acquiring efficient, expressive movement. A brief history/application of LMA is included in the curriculum. Prerequisites: PHYS 1305 and BIOL 2401. Credit 3.

  • DANC 3374 Principles of Dance Technique.

    This course provides the student with an overview of the movement system emphasizing the subjective control experience in dance. Methods of tuning the system including body therapies, conditioning regimes, body awareness techniques, and dance training will be reviewed and compared. Prerequisites: PHY 1305/PHYS 1105, BIOL 2401. Credit 3.

  • DANC 3376 Choreography II.

    The student develops extended dance works which demonstrate advanced understanding of dance as a craft and as an art. Prerequisite: DNC 176, DANC 2376 and/or permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

  • DANC 4330 Repertory.

    The student is involved in rehearsals in which dance works by faculty and guest artists, as well as the great masters of choreography, are staged or reconstructed in preparation for major dance program performances. Credit 3.

  • DANC 4333 Advanced Ballet Technique.

    This is a pre-professional level of ballet technique in which dancers will develop a high degree of technical ability and expressive range. Open by audition only. Prerequisite: DANC 3333 or permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

  • DANC 4334 Advanced Modern Dance Technique.

    This is a pre-professional level of modern dance technique in which dancers will develop a high degree of technical ability and expressive range in the modern dance idiom. Open by audition only. Prerequisite: DNC 334 DANC 3334or permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

  • DNC 435 Jazz IV.

    Intermediate Jazz dance is designed for the dancer with sound foundations in jazz technique. The course will focus on developing technical skills, increasing strength and flexibility, and developing performance quality in jazz dance. Credit 3. *Pending approval by University Curriculum Committee

  • DANC 4372 Dance Criticism and Analysis.

    Students will view outstanding examples of choreography, read the works of major dance critics, and further develop the tools needed to critically analyze choreography. Emphasis is on writing informed, insightful, analyses of the form, content, and effectiveness of choreographic works. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

  • DANC 4374 Dance Pedagogy.

    This course acquaints students in dance with methods for teaching ballet and modern dance technique, and examines the curriculum for dance established by the National Standards for Arts Education for Grades K-12. Students gain theoretical and practical experience, focusing on the use of anatomically correct and systematic approaches to developing dance skills. Class structure, design of exercises, effective communication with students, and selection of appropriate musical accompaniment are examined. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

  • DANC 4376 Choreography III.

    The student develops extended solo, duet, and ensemble works for performance in formal and informal concerts presented by the Dance Program. Prerequisite: DNC 176, DANC 2376, DANC 3376 and/or permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

  • DNC 477 Dance and Technology.

    Dance and Technology introduces methods of integrating media technologies into the dancer’s experience in the areas of dance graphics, sound design for dance, and dance video. Students learn camera, computer and software skills that will facilitate their ability to expand creative expression, as well as enhance their ability to package and promote themselves as artists in a variety of media. Prerequisite: DANC 2376, DANC 3376. Credit 3. *Pending approval by University Curriculum Committee

  • DNC 478 Career Resources in Dance.

    This course is designed for the graduating dance student who is preparing to enter the job market. A major emphasis will be placed on resume building, the job search, and the audition process. At the end of this course students will create and package a portfolio that includes a resume, an audition solo, and various marketing materials. *Pending approval by University Curriculum Committee

  • DANC 4392 Seminar in Dance.

    Opportunities are offered for thorough study of a variety of topics which students may choose in dance. Such topics as Historical Period Dance, Ethno-cultural Studies, Choreographic Projects, et cetera, are illustrative. Credit 3.

  • DANC 4393 Independent Study.

    Opportunities are offered for individual study of an approved problem in dance. Credit 3.

  • FAMC 2301 Creative Arts Seminar.

    This course is an investigation into the theories, meanings, purposes, and practical experiences of the fine arts: dance, music, the visual arts, and theatre.  It includes opportunities to participate in creative activities in each of the subject fields and experience dance and music concerts, theatre productions, and art exhibits.  It is team taught by professors from each of the four disciplines named and satisfies Core Curriculum Area V.  Credit 3.


Early Childhood Education Course Descriptions

    • ECHE 2313 Early Childhood Cognition.

      The curriculum in the preschool and primary grades is presented with an emphasis on the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills. The philosophical orientation of early learning and development, classroom arrangements, selection of material and activities, evaluation procedures, and develop mentally appropriate practices will be studied. Credit 3.

    • ECHE 3315 Developmentally Appropriate Creative Expression.

      This course is intended to provide a foundation in understanding children’s creative thought and expression. Topics also addressed will be the integration of health, physical education, art, drama, creative writing, dance, and music into the curriculum in a way that fosters developmentally appropriate learning and growth. Prerequisite: 30 hours. Credit 3.

    • ECHE 3128 Guidance of Young Children: Field Experience.

      Students will practice behavior management techniques with children in public school pre-kindergarten or kindergarten classrooms. This course is taken concurrently with ECHE 3229. Prerequisite: 60 hours. Credit 1.

    • ECHE 3243 Curriculum for Early Childhood.

      This course will prepare teacher candidates in the EC-6 certification program to become successful in teaching in the early childhood grades, EC-3, by using effective models of teaching and learning. Emphasis is placed on assessment strategies that help strengthen the link between the early childhood grades, EC-3 curriculum and responsive instructional practices for meeting the needs of diverse young children. 10 hours of field experiences in public schools at appropriate levels included in this course.  Prerequisite: 60 hours, CIEE 3374, ECHE 2313, SPED 2301.  Credit: 2.

    • ECHE 3229 Guidance of Young Children.

      Classroom and behavior management techniques which are appropriate for young children will be presented with an emphasis on inductive discipline which leads to self-discipline. This course is taken concurrently with ECHE 3229. Prerequisite: 60 hours. Credit 2.

    • ECHE 3363 Working with Families in Diverse Communities.

      This course is an in-depth study of the relationships between families and schools in diverse communities. Topics addressed in this course include discussions of major theories that support partnerships with parents; models for parent, school, and community partnerships; home, school and community influences on children’s lives; parenting styles; family dynamics; parent education strategies; communication with parents; and the rights and responsibilities of parents, children and teachers. Field experience with young children, their families, and the community will be required. Prerequisites:60 hours. Credit 3.

    • ECHE 4333 Developmentally Appropriate Programs for Young Children.

      An in-depth study will be made of developmentally appropriate practices in schools for young children. Appropriate curriculum and instruction, thematic unit development, and a study of the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills are major areas of emphasis. Field experience is required. Prerequisites: 60 hours. Credit 3.

    • ECHE 4388 Problems in Early Childhood Education.

      This course is designed to permit individual students to study specific areas of interest and need. Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair. Credit 3.

    • ECHE 4373 Early Childhood Theory and Cognition.

      This course is a required course for the Bachelor of Arts in Applied Science in Early Care and Education. The class is designed for early childhood preschool and Head Start teachers who are not seeking Texas Teacher Certification. Topics include an emphasis on the young child’s cognitive, physical, and social abilities as a foundation for planning appropriate classroom experiences. Prerequisite: None. Credit 3.


Economics Course Descriptions

      • ECON 100 Economics of Social Problems

        This course will develop needed critical thinking skills by requiring students to analyze the distributional effects, equity, benefits/costs, and unintended consequences of policies. Students will learn the importance of becoming engaged citizens with an emphasis on efficiency and equity issues. The course will enhance student offerings by providing an additional option to complete the one hour elective in the Social and Behavioral Science component of the university core.

      • ECON 2300 Introduction to Economics. [ECON 1301]

        A combination of micro-economic and macro-economic principles. Designed for those who are neither majors nor minors in economics, but who would benefit from a one semester introduction to economic principles. No credit given for ECON 2300 if ECON 2302 or ECO 234 ECON 2301 previously completed. Credit 3. (Taught each semester.)

      • ECON 2302 Principles of Microeconomics. [ECON 2302]

        Basic economic principles including individual decision making, price theory, analysis of the firm, competition and monopoly, and the distribution of income. Credit 3. (Taught each semester.)

      • ECON 2301 Principles of Macroeconomics.

        The economic role of government, public finance and taxation, unemployment and inflation, national income theory, money and banking, economic fluctuations and growth, and international trade and finance. Credit 3. (Taught each semester.)

      • ECON 3341 Comparative Economics Systems.

        Market oriented, free enterprise capitalism, and its development, compared with alternative economic systems. Prerequisite: ECON 2300 or ECON 2302. Credit 3. (Taught every third long semester.)

      • ECON 3351 Labor Economics.

        Problems of unemployment, wage theory, collective bargaining, labor legislation, and proposals for the solution of labor problems. The recent problems of labor are given special consideration. Prerequisite: ECON 2300 or ECON 2302. Credit 3. (Taught each semester)

      • ECON 3372 Intermediate Macroeconomics.

        National income concepts and measurements; analysis of the factors influencing the level of national income, employment, price, and production; and application to current problems. Prerequisite: ECON 2300 or ECON 2301. Credit 3. (Taught in fall, spring, and SI.)

      • ECON 3373 Urban and Regional Economics.

        Economic problems of metropolitan and rural areas, location theory, regional resources, transportation problems, crime, and poverty. Prerequisite: ECON 2300 or ECON 2302. Credit 3. (Taught only in the fall.)

      • ECON 3374 Public Finance.

        The function of government in the marketplace with emphasis on public goods, externalities, taxation, fiscal federalism, and cost-benefit analysis. Prerequisites: ECON 2300 or ECON 2302 and ECON 2301. Credit 3

      • ECON 3352 Energy and Environmental Economics.

        An examination of how human values, activities, and institutions affect the environment and how the tools of economics can be used to evaluate public policy alternatives designed to improve the quality of the environment. Prerequisite: ECON 2300 or ECON 2302 or ECON 2301. Credit 3. (Taught only in the fall semester).

      • ECON 3357 Intermediate Microeconomics.

        Pricing and output policies of firms, resource pricing, and distribution under condition of perfect competition, monopoly, oligopoly, and monopolistic competition Prerequisite: ECON 2300 or ECON 2302. Credit 3. (Taught in fall, spring, and SI.)

      • ECON 3370 Economics of Business and Government.

        A study of the complex relationship between the business sector and the public sector in the United States and in the global marketplace. Topics will include the regulation of business in its various formats and the promotion of business nationally and internationally. Prerequisite: ECON 2300, 233 ECON 2302, or ECON 2301. Credit 3. (Taught only in the spring semester).

      • ECON 3344 Contemporary International Issues in Economics.

        Examination of current literature dealing with international trade and financial issues. Preparation, presentation and discussion of descriptive and analytical papers. Prerequisite: ECON 2300, ECON 2302, or ECON 2301. Credit 3. (Taught each semester.)

      • ECON 4380 Readings in Economics.

        Individual study arranged with a member of the Economics and Business Analysis faculty. Conferences and written reports are typically required. A carefully prepared research paper concludes the course. This course may be taken for Academic Distinction Program Credit and can be used for Internship credit. This course may be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of the Chair of the Department of Economics and International Business. Credit 1, 2, or 3.

      • ECON 4373 Monetary Economics.

        The role of money in a market economy with special attention given to national and international monetary and banking systems, and to their influence on the levels of income, employment, and , and international capital movements. Prerequisite: ECON 2300 or ECON 2301. Credit 3. (Taught only in the fall.)

      • ECON 4365 Introduction to Business Forecasting and Econometrics.

        The application of statistical methods for business and economic forecasting and for hypothesis testing, estimation, and analyzing economic data Prerequisites: ECON 2302 and ECON 2301, BANA 3363. Credit 3.

      • ECON 4357 Managerial Economics.

        An integration of economic tools of analysis with optimization techniques such as calculus, LaGrangian multipliers and linear programming. Additional topics include risk analysis and decision-making under uncertainty, inventory control, profitability analysis, and capital budgeting. Prerequisites: ECON 2300 or ECON 2302, BANA 2372, BANA 3363. Credit 3. (Taught in fall, spring, and SII.)

      • ECON 4348 Economic Development.

        Theoretical explanations and historical factors of economic development and underdevelopment. Policies for accelerating development in third world countries are analyzed. Prerequisite: ECON 2300 or ECON 2302. Credit 3.

      • ECON 4353 Economics of Sports.

        Application of economic principles to sport. Economic aspects of sports include: demand and supply, advertising, team output decisions, league/conference organization role of government. Prerequisite: ECON 2300 or ECON 2302. Credit 3.

      • ECON 4340 International Economics.

        Economic concepts and analytical tools relating to international economics; examine foreign exchange markets and the theory of balance-of-payments adjustment; examine commercial policy as it relates to international trade; examine the role of international financial institutions. Prerequisite: ECON 2300 or ECON 2302. Credit 3. (Taught only in the spring).

      • ECON 4350 Health Economics and Finance.

        The health care sector compromises one-sixth of the U.S. Gross Domestic Product and has grown continuously over the last 20 years. Given the large employment by the health care sector and the complex policy issues regarding health care, students will benefit from a clear understanding of the structure of the industry.

      • ECON 4389 Internship.

        This course is designed to provide the student an opportunity to apply academic skills in a practical work environment under the supervision and guidance of a working professional. Prerequisites: ECON 2302 and ECON 2301, ACCT 2301 and ACCT 2302, junior standing, overall GPA of 2.5 or greater, and permission of the Departmental Chair.


Bachelor of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies*

      • CIEE 2333 Becoming a Teacher.

        This required course for those seeking EC-6 or 4-8 certification is an introduction to the concept of teaching as a professional career that makes a difference in the lives of children, youth and their families. The course engages the teacher candidates in the examination of social economics, language diversity, historical, political, curriculum, theoretical, and philosophical issues related to making a commitment to education. Ten (10) hours of field experience required in PreK-6 public schools. Credit 3.

      • CIEE 3323 Curriculum for Intermediate Grades.

        Curriculum for Intermediate Grades will prepare teacher candidates to analyze and plan EC-6 content using the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills. For those seeking EC-6 and 4-8 certification only. Prerequisite; Junior Standing and ECHE 2313, ECHE 2315, CIEE 3374, SPED 2301. Must be completed before content methods. Credit 3.

      • CIEE 3374 Human Growth and Learning.

        This course examines growth and learning in elementary environments. Major theories of the teaching-learning process are studied. Human development related to education is emphasized. Special attention is paid to the cultural milieu. Field experiences in public schools (10 hours). Prerequisite: Junior status. Required for EC-6, and 4-8. Credit 3.

      • CIEE 4385 Creating a Positive Learning Environment.

        (This is an elementary block course) The purpose of this course is to provide the prospective elementary or middle school teacher with the experiences in classroom management and discipline theories appropriate for the diverse population of students in the elementary or middle school. Field experiences in public schools (10 hours) Prerequisite: Taken concurrently with the Interdisciplinary Studies Methods Block for EC-6 certification. For 4-8 certification, this course is taken prior to Literacy Methods. Prerequisite: EC-6: Senior standing, successful completion of Literacy Methods, and CIEE 3374. 4-8 certification: Junior status and CIEE 3374 or taken concurrently with CIEE 3374.

      • CIEE 4116 Integrating Technology II.

        The purpose of this course is to plan, organize, deliver, assess, and evaluate instruction for diverse learners in a public school. Incorporating the effective use of technology at each level of the instructional cycle. In addition, this course incorporates the implementation of appropriate media for communication with and among colleagues, mentors and students. Taken concurrently with CIEE 4392, CIEE 4392, and other courses in the Student Teaching Semester. Prerequisites: Senior standing, CIEE 4227, For those seeking EC-6 or 4-8 certification only. Credit 1.

      • CIEE 4117 Assessment.

      • CIEE 4227 Integrating Technology I.

        (This is a middle level block course)This course will apply technology and computers to support instruction in various content areas at the 4-8 level. The course will explore, evaluate, and utilize computer/technology resources to design and deliver instruction as well as to assess student learning. Field experience required. Taken concurrently with the Interdisciplinary Studies Middle Level Education Methods Block. Prerequisite: Senior standing, CIEE 3374 and CIEE 3385. Credit 2.

      • CIEE 4334 Mathematics Instruction in Elementary Grades

        (This is an elementary block course) This course emphasizes making mathematics meaningful to children. Students are to make lesson plans of acceptable quality, to produce practical teaching aids, and to be able to integrate mathematics with other areas of learning. Experience is provided in the selection and evaluation of teaching methods unit and lesson planning, use of curriculum and audio visual materials and the preparation of instructional materials appropriate for social studies content and skills at different elementary and middle school grade levels. Students observe and teach math lessons in an elementary or middle school classroom. Prerequisites: CIEE 3374; Senior status; Admission to Educator Preparation Program and Departmental Approval. Extensive field experiences PK-8 public schools. This course is taken in block with the Interdisciplinary Studies Methods Block for EC-6, 4-8 Math, and 4-8 Math Science Certifications. Credit 3.

      • CIEE 4335 Science Instruction in Elementary Grades.

        (This is an elementary block course) This course is concerned with the scope and sequence of the science curriculum for elementary and middle school children. Experience is provided in the selection and evaluation of teaching materials including audio-visual and internet. Students are given experience in creating lesson and units, planning and incorporating laboratory activities. Students observe and teach science lessons in an elementary or middle school classroom, during 30 hours of required field experience. Prerequisites: Senior status; CIEE 3374; Admission to Educator Preparation Program and Departmental approval. This course is taken with the Interdisciplinary Studies Methods block for EC-6; 4-8 Science and 4-8 Math/Science certifications. Credit 3.

      • CIEE 4336 Social Studies Instruction in Elementary Grades.

        (This is an elementary block course) In this course experience is provided in creating lesson plans and units. Students prepare Instructional materials appropriate for social studies content and skills at different elementary and middle school grade levels are explored.. Emphasis is placed on the unit approach to teaching social studies. Students observe and teach social studies lessons in an elementary or middle school classroom during the 30 hours of field experience. Prerequisites: CIEE 3374; Senior status, Admission to Educator Preparation Program and Departmental approval. This course is taken with the Interdisciplinary Studies Methods Block for EC-6 and 4-8 ELAR/Social Studies Certifications. Credit 3.

      • CIEE 4367 Integrating Technology into Instruction in the Elementary School.

      • CIEE 4375 Problems.

        Designed to permit individual students to study specific areas of interest and need. Prerequisite: Departmental Approval. Credit 3.

      • CIEE 4376 Developing a Professional Teacher Portfolio.

        The purpose of this course is to provide the prospective elementary or middle school teacher the opportunity to organize artifacts on the development, exploration, integration, application, and teaching of content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and skill development in the development of a professional teacher portfolio. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in student teaching and Departmental Approval. Credit: 3.

      • CIEE 4384 Assessment of Student Learning.

      • CIEE 4385 Creating Environments for Learning in the Elementary School.

      • CIEE 4391 Student Teaching in the Elementary School.

        The student is assigned to student teach in an elementary or middle school classroom for a placement of approximately six to seven weeks. This time is divided among observation, participation, teaching and conference activities. The candidate will create a Teacher Work Sample during this placement, a project that demonstrates mastery of the components that produce effective instruction that results in effective student learning. Successful completion of the Teacher Work Sample is required for program completion. Must be taken with CIEE 3374, BESL 4320, SPED 4305, or CISE 4397 and other courses in the student teaching semester. The candidate is assigned two placements that span the certification grades. As an example, an EC-6 student will have one placement in a lower grade such as 1st grade and the second placement in a higher level such as 5th grade. Prerequisite: Senior status and admission to Student Teaching. Credit 3.

      • CIEE 4392 Student Teaching in the Elementary School.

        Substitutions in specialized program areas include BESL 4320, SPED 4384, or CISE 4397. The student is assigned to student teach in an elementary or middle school classroom for a placement of approximately six to seven weeks. Must be taken with CIEE 4391. Prerequisite: Senior status and admission to Student Teaching. Credit 3.

      • CIME 3375 The Middle Level Child.

        This course focuses on effective programs and practices at middle-level schools. Emphasis is placed on a historical perspective and philosophy, components of highly successful programs, and current trends and issues in middle-level education. Field experiences in public schools at appropriate levels included in this course. Prerequisite: Junior Standing.4-8 Certification Co-Requisite: CIME 3376. Credit 3.

      • CIME 3376 Curriculum and Assessment for Middle Grades.

        (This is a middle-level block course) This course will prepare teacher candidates to become successful in teaching in the middle grades by using effective models of teaching and learning. Emphasis is placed on assessment strategies that help strengthen the link between the middle school curriculum and responsive instructional practices for meeting the needs of diverse adolescents. 10 hours of field experiences in public schools at appropriate levels included in this course. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. 4-8 Certification Co-Requisite: CIME 3375. Credit 3.

      • CIME 4334 Teaching Mathematics in Middle Grades.

        (This is an middle-level block course) This course emphasizes making mathematics meaningful to middle-level children. Students are to make lesson plans of acceptable quality, to produce practical teaching aids, and to be able to integrate mathematics with other areas of learning. Experience is provided in the selection and evaluation of teaching methods unit and lesson planning, use of curriculum and audio visual materials and the preparation of instructional materials appropriate for social studies content and skills at different elementary and middle school grade levels. Students observe and teach math lessons in an elementary or middle school classroom. Prerequisites: CIEE 3374; Senior status; Admission to Educator Preparation Program and Departmental Approval. Extensive field experiences PK-8 public schools. This course is taken in block with the Interdisciplinary Studies Methods Block for 4-8 Math and 4-8 Math Science Certifications. Credit 3.

      • CIME 4335 Teaching Science in Middle Grades.

        (This is an middle-level block course) This course is concerned with the scope and sequence of the science curriculum for middle school children. Experience is provided in the selection and evaluation of teaching materials including audio-visual and internet. Students are given experience in creating lesson and units, planning and incorporating laboratory activities. Students observe and teach science lessons in a middle school classroom, during 30 hours of required field experience. Prerequisites: Senior status; CIEE 3374; Admission to Educator Preparation Program and Departmental approval. This course is taken with the Interdisciplinary Studies Methods block for 4-8 Science and 4-8 Math/Science certifications. Credit 3.

      • CIME 4336 Teaching Social Studies in Middle Grades.

        (This is an middle-level block course) In this course experience is provided in creating lesson plans and units. Students prepare instructional materials appropriate for social studies content and skills at different middle school grade levels. Emphasis is placed on the unit approach to teaching social studies. Students observe and teach social studies lessons in a middle school classroom during the 30 hours of field experience. Prerequisites: CIEE 3374; Senior status, Admission to Educator Preparation Program and Departmental approval. This course is taken with the Interdisciplinary Studies Methods Block for 4-8 ELAR/Social Studies Certifications. Credit 3.

      • CIME 4337 Integrating Literacy and Social Studies.

        This course focuses on the study of methods used in the teaching of middle level language arts and social studies. Emphasis is placed on basic models, strategies, and skills necessary for teaching language arts and social studies in an integrated curriculum, and the application in middle-level grades. Credit 3.

      • CIME 4338 Integrating Math and Science.

        This course focuses on the integration of mathematics and science content and pedagogy for middle grades 4-8. Emphasis is placed on a historical perspective and philosophy of mathematics and science integration, problem-based approaches to teaching and learning science and mathematics, planning, teaching, and managing the integration of mathematics and science experiences for the middle school classroom. Credit 3.

      • CIME 4391 Student Teaching in Middle Grades.

      • CIME 4392 Student Teaching in Middle Grades.

        This course focuses on the integration of mathematics and science content and pedagogy for middle grades 4-8. Emphasis is placed on a historical perspective and philosophy of mathematics and science integration, problem-based approaches to teaching and learning science and mathematics, planning, teaching, and managing the integration of mathematics and science experiences for the middle school classroom. Credit 3.


English Course Descriptions

      • ENGL 0111 Tutorial in Basic Writing.

        This course is a one-hour writing tutorial, which focuses on basic conventions of college writing, providing instruction in the fundamentals of English grammar, mechanics, word choice, vocabulary, and spelling. The primary concerns are the word, the sentence, the paragraph, and the short theme. The goals of the course are to raise the students' level of understanding of SAE (Standard American English), support them in the ENGL 1301 in which they are simultaneously enrolled, and prepare them for ENGL 1302. Prerequisite: Score of 360-362 in writing in the Texas Success Initiative Assessment Test or Departmental Approval. Credit: Credit in this course will not be allowed to count toward graduation or computation of grade point average or classification of students by hours completed. (Course does not fulfill University degree requirements.) Companion course/corequisite: ENGL 1301.

      • ENGL 0331 Developmental English.

        An intense study of grammar and mechanics, effective sentence construction, and basic essay organization and development. Credit in this course will not be allowed to count toward graduation or computation of grade point average or classification of students by hours completed. Students scoring 359 or lower in the Texas Success Initiative Assessment Test must enroll in this course. (Does not fulfill University degree requirements.)

      • ENGL 1301 Composition I.

        Basic studies in English diction, sentence structure, and rhetoric with emphasis on the development of college level writing. Students scoring 363 or higher in the Texas Success Initiative Assessment may enroll in this course without the companion course ENGL 0111. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 1301H Composition I.

        (Honors Class) Students with high marks in English on the SAT/ACT exams may qualify to enroll in ENGL 1301H, an accelerated class for students with superior skills in English. Students earning an A or B in ENGL 1301H will receive advanced credit for ENGL 1302 and automatically become eligible for sophomore English. Open to Honors students. Credit 3-6.

      • ENGL 1302 Composition II.

        A continued study of writing skills in English, emphasizing more complex methods in the writing process than ENG 164 ENGL 1301. This course prepares students to write academic essays and research papers. An oral component is also included. Prerequisite: ENG 164 ENGL 1301. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 2332 World Literature I: Before the Seventeenth Century.

        Readings in the classical, medieval, and renaissance masterpieces to analyze and evaluate the philosophical insights and aesthetic values of writers of various cultures. Written assignments are based on themes and concepts in the works studied. Open to all students. Required of English majors. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 2333 World Literature II: The Seventeenth Century and After.

        Readings in selected works of representative writers of various cultures beginning from the seventeenth century through the present. Written assignments are based on themes and concepts in the works studied. Open to all students. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 and 1302. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3330 Introduction to Technical Writing.

        A course in the special problems of technical literature and technical report writing, focusing on the design and content of written communications in business, industry, and government. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301 and ENGL 1302. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3334 Literature and Film.

        A study of the structure, imagery, characterization, and themes of novels, short stories, essays and poems with those of selected motion picture films. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2331 or ENGL 2342. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3336 Studies in Women's Literature.

        A study of works by women writers encompassing a variety of genres, nationalities, and literary periods. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3337 African-American Literature.

        Exploration of historical, political, and literary problems particular to African-American writers; the course also explores the development of African-American identity through cultural expression in a variety of media and genres. Prerequisites: NGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3338 Studies in Multicultural Literature.

        Study of themes, techniques, and literary movements from different cultures. Focus will typically be on more than one ethnic or national culture. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3360 Survey of American Literature, Beginning to 1865.

        A survey of themes, genres, and authors in American literary history from the period of exploration and settlement through the American Renaissance and the Civil War. Required of all English majors. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3361 Survey of American Literature, 1865 to the Present.

        A survey of authors, genres, and movements in American literature from 1865 to the present, including representative works of Realism, Naturalism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism. Required of all English majors. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3363 Mythology.

        The study of myths and their application to literary studies. Recommended for certification program in Language Arts composite (see Secondary Education Requirements). Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3364 Folklore.

        The study of folk motifs of various cultures throughout the world. Recommended for certification program in Language Arts (see Secondary Education Requirements). Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3370 Modern Drama.

        The major figures in modern British, American and Continental drama. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3372 Introduction to Linguistics.

        A general introduction to English linguistics. The course covers areas such as the sound system of English, the structure and meaning of words and sentences, language use in context, language and the brain, dialect and register variation, and the place and history of English among the languages of the world. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3373 English Grammar.

        An introduction to the linguistic analysis of English sentence structure. Students learn to identify different grammatical forms and their functions, different sentence types, and transformations. The course provides an analytic understanding of students’ pre-existing linguistic knowledge—the knowledge that allows them to generate an infinite number of grammatical patterns with a mere handful of rules. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, 1302, and either 2332 or 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3374 Teaching Writing and Literature in Secondary Schools.

        Theory and practices of teaching writing and literature in the secondary school. The course will focus on classroom practices, definition of standards, invention, assignment design, evaluation of student writing, and approaches to young adult literature. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, 1302, either 2332 or 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. ENGL 3373 strongly recommended. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3377 Argument and Persuasion.

        An advanced writing class that focuses on successful argumentative and persuasive writing. Study will include a survey of the history of argument, structuring of a sound argument, and stylistics. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 378 Designing Written Documents.

        In this course students will analyze and create written and electronic documents using major rhetorical and visual design theories. Students will craft professional texts that integrate effective visual and written strategies to create complete and compelling messages across a variety of workplace genres. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and ENGL 3330. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3380 Advanced Composition.

        A study of rhetorical forms and approaches to problems of composition. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3381 Introductory Creative Writing: Fiction.

        Directed writing in fiction. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3382 Introductory Creative Writing: Poetry.

        Directed writing in poetry. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3383 Practicum in Publishing.

        The study of topics and issues related to editing and publishing. Students will be placed with internal or external organizations for semester-long internships. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and either ENGL 3381 or ENGL 3382. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3384 Early British Masterworks.

        A study of the major figures in British literature from the beginning to 1798. Required for all English majors. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3385 Later British Masterworks.

        A study of the major figures in British literature from 1798 to the present. Required for all English majors. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3388 Texas Crossroads.

        An interdisciplinary study of intersections among literature, history, science, culture and politics of the “Crossroads” area of Texas. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3390 The Bible as Literature.

        Narrative, structural, and thematic study of selected books of the Old and New Testament. Course of study includes an examination of Hebrew and Christian scriptures in translation and an analysis of various genres. Consideration will also be given to the cultural and mythological context of selected portions and to some of the literary influences exerted by these passages. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3391 Shakespeare: Tragedies & Histories.

        A study of Shakespeare’s tragedies and histories, from the earliest experiments of his career to the great history plays of the 1590s through the major tragedies of the early 1600s. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 3392 Shakespeare: Comedies & Romance.

        A study of Shakespeare’s comedies and romances from his early years through the great festive comedies of the late 1590s through the “Dark Comedies” of the 1600s to the romances of the last years of his career. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, and either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4330 Writing in the Professions.

        Additional training in technical writing, including instruction in the preparation and editing of specialized documents in various professional writing situations. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and ENGL 3330. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4331 Composition Theory and the Teaching of Writing.

        An introduction to pedagogical technique for composition appropriate for elementary and secondary students. Major theories of composition will be studied. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4335 Studies in Rhetoric.

        Selected topics may include rhetorical theory, style and stylistics, rhetorical criticism, ethical issues in rhetoric, and rhetoric literature. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4339 Literature of Diversity.

        A study of literature by women and by persons of color appropriate for the secondary English classroom. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4360 The British Romantic Movement.

        A survey of the Romantic movement in England, with major emphasis upon the works of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Keats, and Shelley. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4363 Studies in the British Renaissance.

        A study of non-dramatic literature of England written between 1500 and 1660. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4364 Methods of Teaching English in Secondary Schools.

        Directed studies and practice in the selection, organization, and presentation of English subject matter and skills to students. Required for English majors and minors who are working for a secondary teaching certificate. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4365 Victorian Literature.

        A survey of major writers of the Victorian period, supplemented by lectures on the political, social and economic background of the age. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and ENGL 3375. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4367 History of the English Language.

        A survey of the English language, including its relationship to other Indo-European languages, followed by a study of the changes in English sounds, morphology, syntax, and lexicon from Anglo-Saxon times to the present. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4369 Studies of Selected Genres in American Literature.

        Readings in major writers, themes, and/or historical movements within a selected genre in American literature. The approach may vary from semester to semester, and will include such subjects as modern poetry, the short story, the Naturalists, folklore, regional literature, nonfiction prose, or others. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level.  Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4370 American Regional Literature.

        Selected representative Southern/Southwestern writers. Readings will emphasize works of artistic merit, but they may include ancillary material such as folklore, “local color,” and historical documents for background study. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4372 American Literature: 1820s to 1860s.

        A study of the emergence of a distinctive American literary art, including such writers as Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, and Whitman. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level.  Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4374 Studies in the British Novel.

        The study of a variety of topics and figures in the British novel. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4375 Special Problems in English.

        Directed study on individual topics or problems for advanced students. Admission by permission of the Department Chair. This course may be taken for Academic Distinction credit. See Academic Distinction Program in this catalog. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 1-4.

      • ENGL 4376 Tudor and Stuart Drama.

        The development of the drama in England, the predecessors and contemporaries of Shakespeare. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4377 British Literature of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century: 1660-1800.

        A study of the drama, poetry, and prose of the “long eighteenth century.” The course reads the works of such writers as Dryden, Swift, Pope, and Johnson within their cultural contexts. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4378 Studies in World Fiction.

        The study of a variety of topics and figures in world fiction. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4380 Advanced Creative Writing: Nonfiction.

        An advanced undergraduate writing workshop that emphasizes the theory and craft of creative nonfiction, with special attention to peer review of student writing in the areas of the memoir, the personal essay, personal cultural criticism, and literary journalism. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and ENGL 3380. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4381 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction.

        An advanced undergraduate writing workshop that emphasizes the theory of modern and contemporary fiction, with special attention to peer review of student writing in the areas of the novel and short fiction. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and ENGL 3381. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4382 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry.

        An advanced writing class that emphasizes the writing of poetry, with related outside readings in poetic theory and form. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and ENGL 3382. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4383 The Development of Drama in America.

        A study of major movements and significant figures in American dramatic literature from Royall Tyler to the present. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4384 Studies in the American Novel.

        The study of a variety of topics and figures in the American novel. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4385 Studies in Chaucer.

        A close study of the works of Chaucer, with primary emphasis on The Canterbury Tales as they reflect the man and his times. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4386 Literature of the Middle Ages.

        A study of selected works of Old and Middle English literature with some continental works. The course will include, at various times, works as early as Beowulf (ca. 8th-9th c.) to ones as late as Malory’s Morte D’Arthur (late 15th c.). Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level.  Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4387 Twentieth-Century Literature of England, Ireland, and the Commonwealth.

        A study of a variety of 20th-century literature by writers associated with England, Ireland, or English-speaking groups (not American) formerly colonized by the British. Though the course varies from term to term, it generally aims to have students read literary works by major figures, learn of the cultural and historical forces influencing these works and writers, and develop an understanding of the main concepts and movements that distinguish this body of literature. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4390 Literary Criticism and Theory.

        A survey of the major modes of literary criticism. Study of the basic concepts underlying specific theories of literary criticism and their application and impact within a literary field selected by the instructor. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 3 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level. Credit 3.

      • ENGL 4394 Studies in Seventeenth-Century British Literature.

        This course is designed to offer students a survey of British literature in the seventeenth century. Major authors of the period will be given special attention. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and ENGL 3384. Credit: 3.

      • ENGL 4399 Modified Topics.

        The modified topics course is designed to vary from semester to semester. Topics may focus on a particular author, region, period, theme, genre, or critical approach. Prerequisites: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, either ENGL 2332 or ENGL 2333, and 6 hrs. of ENGL 3000-level.


English as a Second Language Course Descriptions

      • TESL 3303 Literacy Strategies for English Language Learners.

        This course emphasizes linguistic and cultural principles, lesson planning, practical methods, curricula and materials for teaching English to speakers of other languages in pre-kindergarten to sixth grade classrooms. Students will gain first-hand experience working with linguistically and culturally diverse students in Texas schools. Prerequisite: BESL 3301. Credit 3.

      • TESL 4303 Teaching English as a Second Language.

        The course identifies current instructional methods and approaches to teaching English as a second language to nonnative speakers of English beginning at the early childhood level through adult. Principles and concepts of second language learning, linguistic contrasts between English and other languages, and the instructional processes are emphasized. Field experience in PK-12 schools required. Concurrent enrollment in BESL 3301. Prerequisite: Junior Standing and BESL 2301. Credit 3.


Environmental Science Course Descriptions

      • ENVR 3305 Legal Aspects of Pollution Control.

        A study comparing various state and federal laws with particular emphasis on the State of Texas statutes will be conducted. Nature of evidence for prosecution under these laws will be considered. Fall. Prerequisite: BIOL 1301/1101, and CHEM 2401. Credit 3.

      • ENVR 3310 Environmental Sanitation.

        A study of topics relating to public health and sanitation. The causative agents of human diseases of public health importance are characterized, and present knowledge of prevention and control of these diseases is reviewed. Two-hour laboratory. Odd year, Fall. Prerequisite: BIOL 1311/1111, BIOL 1313/1113, BIOL 2420, OR BIOL 3470, and 8 hrs. of chemistry. Credit 3.

      • ENVR 3320 Solid Wastes and Recycling.

        A study of solid wastes and recycling pertaining to sources, storage, processing, economics, and legal issues involved. Physical and chemical components of wastes and waste processing and their environmental effects will be stressed. Odd year, Spring. Prerequisite: BIOL 1311/1111, BIOL 1313/1113, BIOL 2420 or BIOL 3470, ENVR 3305, GEOL 1303/1103, and CHEM 2401 and Junior standing.Credit 3.

      • ENVR 3330 Industrial Hygiene.

        A study of industrial hygiene and occupational health and safety. This course will present the basics of industrial hygiene and work place monitoring. Emphasis will be on fundamentals of work place hazard recognition, techniques of evaluation, and methods of control. Even year, Spring. Prerequisite: BIOL 1311/1111, BIOL 1313/1113, CHEM 2401, and PHYS 1301/1101, PHYS 1302/1102. Credit 3.

      • ENVR 3430 Water Supply and Waste Water Disposal.

        Water supply, development, treatment and distribution; waste water collection and treatment; water purification and reuse; and the chemistry and ecology of aquatic systems are studied. Two-hour laboratory. Fall. Prerequisite: BIOL 1301/1101, CHEM 2401, and MATH 1420. Credit 4.

      • ENVR 4095 Special Topics in Environmental Science.

        Individual study in specialized areas of Environment Science. To be directed and approved by the Environmental Science advisor. Credit 1, 2, or 3.

      • ENVR 4110 Undergraduate Seminar.

        Student discussions of current scientific literature in environmental science. Required of environmental science majors. Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Credit 1 each.

      • ENVR 4111 Undergraduate Seminar.

        Student discussions of current scientific literature in environmental science. Required of environmental science majors. Fall, Spring. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Credit 1 each.

      • ENVR 4305 Hazardous Waste Management.

        This course deals with the technical and regulatory aspects of handling and disposing of toxic and hazardous wastes based on recently mandated legislation procedures. This course will educate current students in an area that is of major national concern and will update persons already working in the field of environmental science. Spring. Prerequisite: Prerequisites: CHEM 2401, BIOL 1301/1101, GEOL 1303/1103, and Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • ENVR 4320 Environmental Toxicology.

        (Also listed as BIOL 4320). This course presents basic toxicology as a qualitative and quantitative science of the effects of poisons (toxins) upon the environment, individuals, and populations. The course will also provide a comparison of the toxicology of human and other species’ exposure to common environmental contaminants. Two one-hour lectures and one two-hour laboratory. Even year, Fall. Prerequisite: BIOL 1311/1111, BIOL 1313/1113, and BIOL 2420 or BIOL 3470; MATH 3379 or BIOL 4374; 8 hrs. CHEM, and Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • ENVR 4361 Environmental Science Field Experience.

        A supervised off-campus intern work experience in an approved area of Environmental Science with industry, business, or government. This course provides the student with direct professional work experience with industry or governmental entity. Academic credit is based on a written technical report and an oral presentation. Summer. Prerequisite: 6 hrs. of advanced Environmental Science and approval of instructor. Credit 3.


Family and Consumer Sciences Course Descriptions

      • FACS 1330 Introductory Soft Textiles Construction.

        Fundamental principles and techniques of clothing and textiles-based interior elements construction are studied. Pattern alteration and fitting techniques are included. Practical applications are provided through laboratory experiences. (2-2). Usually offered alternate semesters. Credit 3.

      • FACS 1331 Introduction to Hospitality Industry.

        An overview of the hospitality industry, this course includes restaurants, hotels and resorts. Includes historical perspective, analysis of the industry in terms of professional opportunities and the future outlook for the industry. (3-0). Credit 3.

      • FACS 1360 Basic Principles of Design.

        Specific attention is given to fundamental art elements and principles of design as they function in the lives of individuals and their environments. Opportunities are provided for a variety of experiences with art media through lecture-demonstrations. Practical application in two-dimensional and three-dimensional projects is made through laboratory experiences. (2-2). Credit 3.

      • FACS 1367 Basic Nutrition.

        Basic principles of nutrition in health and disease. The modern concept of an adequate diet based upon the nutritional needs of the individual is stressed. Two interrelating factors, the influence of nutrition on disease and the influence of disease on nutrition, are stressed. Emphasis is placed on food selection and quality of nutrients in normal diets. (3-0). Credit 3.

      • FACS 1441 Food Preparation and Selection.

        Scientific principles in the preparation of selected basic food products are applied. Consideration is given to the composition and properties of food, methods of preparation and processing to retain nutrients, standards for desirable products, simple meal service, and food economics. Practical application is made through laboratory experiences. (3-2). Credit 4.

      • FACS 2078 Special Topics in Family and Consumer Sciences.

        On-line instruction provides opportunities for students to take lower-level courses through the Family and Consumer Sciences Distance Education Alliance (open to FCS teacher certification majors only). Registration is permitted only with departmental approval. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Credit 3-4.

      • FACS 2361 History of Furniture I.

        A study of history of interior furniture and furnishings from the Egyptian period to the present. Emphasis is given to the social, economic, and political conditions that influenced furniture design and use. (3-0). Credit 3.

      • FACS 2362 Nutrition.

        Study is made of the fundamental concepts of nutrition. The various nutrients, their sources, metabolism, physiology and interrelationships are emphasized. Requirements at different stages of growth and development are studied. Experience is provided in making dietary studies and in adjusting meals for individuals and population groups. (3-0). Meets requirement for pre-nursing curriculum. Prerequisite: BIOL 2401. Credit 3.

      • FACS 2364 Design Theory and Materials.

        A theoretical analysis of design is merged with understanding of interior materials and products which meet human needs. Assessment of quality and performance criteria is emphasized, along with the design process. Prerequisite: FACS 1360. (3-0). Credit 3.

      • FACS 2365 Digital Drawning for Interiors.

        This course addresses computer graphics for interior designers. This course will focus on implementing the design process through computer aided drafting techniques to produce construction and presentation drawings. Students will explore various computer aided drafting techniques to develop 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional drawings. Prerequisites: FACS 1360, FACS 2364, and FACS 2387. (3-0) Credit 3.

      • FACS 2366 Fashion in Society.

        Basic fashion theory is studied along with theories of dress and adornment from both psychological and sociological perspectives. The course also examines the individual’s attitudes toward and perceptions of personal dress and the appearance of others. Usually offered alternate semesters. (3-0). Credit 3.

      • FACS 2368 Consumer Education.

        This study of consumer goods and services includes the study of rational consumer decisions in an electronic economy, major consumption expenditures, budget management, risk management, financial management, quality assessment, marketing, and consumer legislation. (3-0). Credit 3.

      • FACS 2369 Introduction to Textiles.

        This course provides an introduction to fiber science and technological advances in the manufacture of textile products. It focuses on the complex interrelationships of fibers, yarns, fabrics, finishes, and coloring processes. Usually offered alternate semesters and summer. (3-0). Credit 3.

      • FACS 2387 Architectural Graphics for Interiors.

        The course focuses on the development of two-dimensional graphic representations of architectural design. Practical application is achieved through development of drafting skills and representational sketching. (2-2). Prerequisite: MATH 1332 or MATH 1314 Credit 3.

      • FACS 2388 Building Systems for Interiors.

        This course focuses on helping students to develop an understanding of building systems as they apply to interior design. Student understanding of systems is communicated in drawing of construction, electrical, mechanical, ceiling and floor systems as part of design solutions. (2-2). Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FACS 2387 or Grade of D in MATH 1332 or MATH 1314. Credit 3.

      • FACS 2441 Meal Management in Hospitality.

        This course includes choice, purchase, preparation and service of meals in hospitality settings. Through laboratory experiences emphasis is given to table settings and appointments, various forms of meal service and special occasion functions. The importance of acceptable social procedures and aesthetic values related to the above activities are stressed. (3-2). Offered alternate semesters. Credit 4.

      • FACS 3330 Pattern Making and Apparel Production.

        Industry techniques in the construction and fit of garments from original designs. Construction using superior quality techniques is emphasized. Students develop skills in use of apparel production equipment. (2-2). Usually offered alternate semesters. Prerequisites: FACS 1330, FACS 1360, and FACS 2369. Credit 3.

      • FACS 3332 Lighting Applications for Interiors.

        This course provides basic principles of light and color, measurement and control of light as applied to human needs in both residential and commercial interiors. Environmental systems for day lighting and solar design are studied. (3-0). Usually offered alternate semesters. Prerequisites: Grade of C or better in FACS 2364 and FACS 2388 and 45 hours. Credit 3.

      • FACS 3334 Lodging Operations.

        A study is made of principles involving basic operations of hospitality facilities including guest expectations, management of services, budget control, personnel management and security. (3-0). Prerequisite: FACS 1331. Credit 3.

      • FACS 3337 Design Process.

        This course will focus on the implementation of the design process through drawings and model construction techniques. Students will explore various rendering media and develop three-dimensional drawings along with volumetric study of spaces. (1-4). Prerequisites: ARTS 1316, ITEC 2363.  Grade of C or better in FACS 2364 and FACS 2388. Credit 3.

      • FACS 3338 Residential Design.

        This course will focus on applying the design process to residential spaces. It will include development of schematic and technical drawings, material selection, perspective representations of space, and specifications. (1-4). Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FACS 2388, FACS 3337, and ITEC 2363. Credit 3.

      • FACS 3339 Community and Life Cycle Nutrition.

        This course explores communities and their composition and influences on nutrition habits and nutrition status. Community, state, and national food and nutrition programs and services will be discussed with emphasis on program goals, target audiences and policy formulation. The course also explores program development via assessing needs, developing objectives, implementing interventions and evaluating programs. (3-0). Prerequisite: FACS 1367 or FACS 2362. Credit 3.

      • FACS 3350 Discoveries in Chemistry, Textiles, and Nutritional Sciences.

        This study abroad course is focused on 18th- to early 20th-century scientists, with special emphasis on the times in which they worked, important aspects of their efforts, the impact of their personal lives on their scientific careers, and their enduring legacy to contemporary society in the form of discoveries in chemistry, biochemistry, textiles, and nutritional science. Lectures take place in the same geographical settings where the work occurred. Prerequisite: CHEM 1406 or CHEM 1411, junior standing, or permission of instructor. Offered odd years during the Spring/Summer I break. Cross-listed with CHEM 3361. (3-0). Credit 3.

      • FACS 3360 Interior Design Professional Practices and Procedures.

        This course includes fundamentals of business procedures used in interior design residential and commercial establishments. Practical application is implemented through design project management. (3-0). Usually offered alternate semesters. Prerequisite: FACS 2364, FACS 2388. Credit 3.

      • FACS 3361 History of Furnishings II.

        This course is focused on the study of history of interiors, architecture, and furnishings from the colonial period to the present. Emphasis is given to the social, economic, and political conditions that influenced furniture, interior, and architectural design. Usually offered alternate semesters. (3-0) Credit 3.

      • FACS 3364 Survey of Interior Design for Non-Majors.

        This course is designed for students pursuing teacher certification in secondary Family and Consumer Sciences. Content includes design theory, materials, space planning, manual and computer-aided project drafting, and project planning and implementation. This course will not count as credit toward the major in Interior Design. Prerequisites: FACS 1360, FACS 2369, junior standing. (2-2). Credit 3.

      • FACS 3367 Food Science.

        This course provides fundamentals of physical and chemical structures and properties of food materials and foods during harvesting, preparation, processing, preservation and storage. (1-4). Usually offered alternate semesters. Prerequisites: BIOL 4 hrs. CHEM 4 hrs., FACS 1441, FACS 1367 or FACS 2362. Credit 3.

      • FACS 3369 Family Relationships.

        This course focuses on analysis of the changing and supportive role of the members in the contemporary stages of the family life cycle. Study is made of family heritage and family interaction patterns with an emphasis on individual development. (3-0). Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • FACS 3370 Nutritional Pathways.

        This advanced course establishes knowledge and understanding of nutritional concepts in the biochemical context. Biochemical, physical and metabolic functions of the nutrients; pathways of each nutrient in the diet from ingestion through digestion, assimilation and metabolism; digestive and metabolic interactions between drugs and nutrients are discussed. This course cannot be used for credit toward biology or chemistry majors. (3-0). Prerequisites: CHEM 1312/1112, FACS 2362, Jr. standing. Credit 3.

      • FACS 3371 Fashion Merchandising.

        This course addresses fundamental principles for successful merchandising of fashion goods, including sales, buying, and marketing procedures. Analysis of consumer and customer demands also are explored. Taken prior to FACS 4369 Internship. (3-0). Prerequisite: Junior standing. Usually offered alternate semesters years. Credit 3.

      • FACS 3376 Textile Science.

        This course involves exploration of textiles from a scientific perspective is emphasized, explaining the interactions among textile fibers, finishes, dyes and laundry products that impact maintenance of textile products and performance criteria. Students are exposed to hands-on experiences with various fibers, finishes, and dyeing processes. (3-0). Usually offered alternate semesters. Prerequisites: FACS 2369, Sophomore standing. Credit 3.

      • FACS 3377 Codes, Standards, and Facility Maintenance.

        A study of laws, codes, standards and regulations that are in effect to protect human health and safety is the focus of this course. Included are the fire and life safety codes, barrier-free design, and ergonomics. (3-0). Usually offered alternate semesters. Credit 3.

      • FACS 3378 Fashion Promotion.

        Promotion principles are applied to the merchandising of fashion goods through special events, displays of merchandise, and advertising and personal selling. (3-0). Usually offered alternate years. Prerequisite: FACS 1360. Credit 3.

      • FACS 3445 Quantity Food Purchasing, Preparation and Service.

        Course provides experience in menu planning, food preparation service, and use of institutional equipment in quantity food service. Principles and methods of buying, preparing, and serving food for various types of quantity food facilities are considered. Factors affecting food quality, food costs, and quantity food production as related to the time factor are emphasized. Planned to meet the needs of dietitians, food service administrators, lunchroom supervisors, family and consumer sciences teachers and others in related areas. Field and practical application is provided. Laboratory experiences arranged. (2-4). Usually offered alternate semesters. Prerequisite: FACS 1441 or FACS 1441. Credit 4.

      • FACS 4068 Research Problems.

        Seminars provide adequate research experiences for students having special needs and requirements for the completion of work for a degree. Registration is permitted only by approval of the department chair. Course may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 1-4.

      • FACS 4330 Commercial Design I.

        A study is made of design development of interiors through analysis of space and structure. Focus is on comprehensive design solutions implemented through multiphase projects including space planning, contract documents, specifications, finish selections, sustainability, and various presentation techniques. (1-4). Usually offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: FACS 3338, FACS 3360, FACS 3377, ITEC 2363. Credit 3.

      • FACS 4331 Commercial Design II.

        The capstone course for Interior Design majors, this course includes a semester-long project or a series of comprehensive projects preparing students for internship and professional office settings. Students are encouraged to demonstrate knowledge gained to-date to solve various design situations. Graphics presentations include hand and digital drawings and media. (1-4). Usually offered spring semesters. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FACS 4330, FACS 3377, and ITEC 2363. Credit 3.

      • FACS 4333 Child Development and Guidance.

        This course includes directed observation and participation in a child development center or public school setting to provide students with experience in the practical aspects of child development. Emphasis is placed upon helping children build feelings of security and adequacy and maintaining limits of behavior. Lectures are concerned with types of child-based care, rearing and guidance; growth and development; clothing; and nutrition for prenatal through adolescent years. (3-0). Offered alternate years. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Credit 3.

      • FACS 4360 Clinical Dietetics I.

        Study is made of diet therapy as it is concerned with its use as an agent in affecting recovery from illness. Course includes the latest developments in dietary manipulations during disease states including enteral and parenteral nutrition. Nutritional adequacy of therapeutic diets is stressed, with emphasis placed on sociological, economic, emotional and psychological factors in feeding the sick. Students enrolled are required to spend 4-5 hours per week in the dietary department of a local hospital to gain hands-on knowledge of clinical dietetics. (3-0). Usually offered alternate semesters . Prerequisites: FACS 3370, FACS 4378, Senior standing. Credit 3.

      • FACS 4361 Clinical Dietetics II.

        This course is a continuation of the prerequisite course, FACS 4360 (Clinical Dietetics I). In this course the student will examine the applications of medical nutrition therapy in the prevention and management of various medical conditions and chronic and acute disease states through lecture, discussion and clinical case studies. Students may be required to spend additional time (4-5hrs/wk) observing dietitians at a local hospital in order to enhance learning and refine clinical practice skills. (3-0). Usually offered alternate semesters. Prerequisite: Grade of D or better in FACS 4360. Credit 3.

      • FACS 4362 Presentation Techniques.

        A study is made of different types of presentations used to communicate a technique, an idea, or a product. Principles and techniques of communication and media with emphasis on classroom, extension and commercial presentation are covered. Classroom experience includes actual preparation and presentation of lecture materials for direct and video audiences. Also included is development is resumes and portfolios. (3-0). Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • FACS 4363 Merchandising Control.

        Techniques of merchandise control including retail mathematics involved in markup, markdown, stock control, open-to-buy, inventory control, pricing and financial statements are studied. Consideration is given to managerial decisions based on the mathematical information encountered in retailing. Recommended prior to FACS 4369 Internship. (3-0). Usually offered alternate semesters. Prerequisites: FACS 3371, ACCT 2301, or consent of instructor, Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • FACS 4364 Methods in Teaching Family and Consumer Sciences.

        A study of professional competencies required to teach family and consumer sciences including development of curriculum. Analysis and evaluation of teaching methods, procedures, strategies, and resource materials used in Family and Consumer Sciences. Laboratory situation includes preparing, presenting and video taping micro teaching experiences. (3-0). Also offered through the FCS Alliance. Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education program, FACS 4333, CISE 3384, and forty hours family and consumer sciences. Credit 3.

      • FACS 4465, FACS 4366 Student Teaching in Family and Consumer Sciences.

        Supervised observation and teaching in Family and Consumer Sciences. Off-campus teaching centers furnish laboratory experiences for the courses. Activities include work with the total school program, supervising and working with occupational activity program, parental contacts, advisory council, and FCCLA. Advance registration required. (6-0). Prerequisites: Twelve hours secondary education, forty hours family and consumer sciences, FACS 4364 or CISE 4364, and forty-five clock hours of observation in secondary family and consumer sciences which must be documented and completed prior to enrolling. Credit 6.

      • FACS 4367 Seminar in Clothing, Textiles, and Merchandising.

        This course consists of inquiry in special areas of clothing: marketing, production, consumption and socioeconomic behavioral aspects of consumers of textiles and clothing. (3-0). Usually offered alternate semesters. Prerequisites: FACS 3371, Junior standing in fashion merchandising or family and consumer sciences. Credit 3.

      • FACS 4369 Internship.

        Course consists of a supervised off-campus work experience in an approved cooperative business or agency to better understand the challenges and potential of various careers in family and consumer sciences professions and services. Student obtains own position in keeping with the major program area. A minimum of three hundred (300) supervised clock hours is required for appropriate credit, and student must be enrolled in FACS 4369 at the time the work is being completed. Taken on acceptance of the application. Prerequisites: Senior standing (100 hours) in program major, 2.0 GPA. Credit 3.

      • FACS 4370 Advanced Food Systems, Organization and Management.

        Course is focused on principles of organization and management as they relate to food service systems; development of managerial and motivational skills; communications; decision making; management by objectives. (3-0). Usually offered alternate semesters. Prerequisite: FACS 3445. Credit 3.

      • FACS 4371 Nutrition Assessment.

        This course uses a problem-based learning approach to case studies integrated with a dummy assessment lab to foster development of independent subjective global nutrition assessment when working with individual clients and patients in a clinical setting. Digital and software scenarios will be used. With the addition of an appropriate project, this course can be taken for graduate credit. (2-2). Credit 3. Prerequisite: FACS 4361 or equivalent.

      • FACS 4372 Resource Management.

        Managerial and social problems pertaining to individuals and families are examined. Emphasis is placed on decision-making of time, energy, and financial management as well as efficient use of resources. (3-0). Offered alternate semesters or through the FCS Alliance. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • FACS 4373 Cultural Food Practices.

        Cultural food practices from around the world will be reviewed. An exploration and appreciation of how cultural factors affect our food patterns and assist in understanding cultural competency will be presented. Students will be taught various nutrition education strategies used to make effective dietary changes in keeping with cultural norms. (3-0). Credit 3. Prerequisites: FACS 1441, FACS 2362, FACS 3339.

      • FACS 4378 Advanced Nutrition.

        Course focus is on concepts of normal nutrition in relation to the chemistry and physiology of the human body; analysis of methods used in assessing human nutrition status; evaluation of current nutritional problems. (3-0). Usually offered alternate semesters. Prerequisite: FACS 3370. Credit 3.


Finance Course Descriptions

      • FINC 1307 Personal Finance.

        A study of the problems of personal financial management. Topics include savings, risks, investment considerations, insurance, taxation, governmental programs in financial planning, etc. Also recommended for non-business majors. Credit 3.

      • FINC 3310 Financial Institutions and Markets.

        This course explores the process of providing external funds and finance with emphasis on the role of financial institutions and markets. The nature, participants, instruments, and relationships of the money and capital markets are examined. Credit 3.

      • FINC 3320 Business Finance.

        This course is a study of financial principles as applied to corporate investment and financing decisions. The ethical role of the financial manager is examined as it relates to value creation. International finance is also introduced. Prerequisites: ACCT 2302 and MATH 1324 or equivalent. Credit 3.

      • FINC 4380 Problems in Finance.

        The student may pursue special studies for which a special course is not organized. Prerequisites: 30 hours of Business Administration and consent of department chair. Credit 1, 2, or 3.

      • FINC 4335 Financial Statement and Credit Analysis.

        A study of theoretical issues and various applications relevant to the analysis of financial statements using finance and accounting principles Readings and case studies are utilized to provide a contemporary perspective. Prerequisite: FINC 3320. Credit 3.

      • FINC 4365 Seminar in Financial Derivatives.

        A study of options, futures, and other financial derivative contracts. The course includes the markets, valuation, and specification of these derivative contracts, and their use in corporate financial risk management. Prerequisite: FINC 3320. Credit 3. Typically offered only during the fall semester.

      • FINC 4325 Selling Financial Services.

        This course offers a study of the process and principles involved in selling financial instruments and services. It emphasizes the special aspects related to selling/marketing in the banking industry. Both financial products and services will be addressed. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. Credit 3. The course is typically offered only during the fall semester.

      • FINC 4315 Entrepreneurial and Small Firm Finance.

        A study of the development, implementation, and control of financial plans, strategies, and policies by owner-managers of small firms. Financing alternatives for small firms are explored. Prerequisite: FINC 3320. Credit 3. Typically offered only during the spring semester.

      • FINC 4320 Commercial Banking.

        This course incorporates the roles of banks in the financial services industry and the specific functions in a bank. Case studies are utilized to reinforce the materials and provide first-hand experience about bank operations. The course also presents the roles of the regulatory authorities and their interaction with banks. Special attention is given to recent changes in bank regulation. Prerequisites: FINC 3310 and FINC 3320. Credit 3.

      • FINC 4390 Managerial Finance.

        This course includes an in depth study of some of the tools used in financial management. Problems in the valuation of securities, capital costs, capital budgeting, risk analysis, capital structure, financial statement analysis, and dividend policy are stressed. Prerequisite: FINC 3320 with a minimum grade of C. Credit 3.

      • FINC 4340 International Finance.

        This course provides the student with a background in international finance by examining financial circumstances/problems unique to business entities engaged in international business. Topics include the structure and functioning of the foreign exchange market, the identification, measurement and management of foreign exchange risks, trade financing, investment analysis, financing choices, and financial control of international operations. Prerequisite: FINC 3320. Credit 3. Typically offered only during the fall semester.

      • FINC 4330 Commercial Bank Lending.

        A study of theoretical issues and various applications relevant to the commercial lending activities of a bank using finance principles. Readings and case studies are utilized to provide a contemporary perspective. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • FINC 4345 Investments.

        • This course is an introduction to securities markets: analysis of money market instruments, mutual funds, stocks, bonds, options, futures and other securities. Theoretical concepts in investment analysis and trading applications are developed. Analysis of derivative securities and their use in the context of hedging are introduced. Prerequisite: FINC 3320. Credit 3.

      • FINC 4355 Security Analysis and Portfolio Management.

        This course is an advanced analysis and study of the techniques for selecting and combining securities into a portfolio. Content includes identifying appropriate investment objectives, structuring an appropriate statement of investment policy, and techniques for investment management. Emphasis is placed on diversification and risk management.

      • FINC 4389 Undergraduate Internship in Finance.

        A course designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply academic skills in a practical work environment. (See Finance Internship Coordinator prior to enrolling. A minimum of 150 work hours in a pre approved finance organization. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit granted for internship.)


First-Year Experience Course Description

      • UNIV 1301 Introduction to Collegiate Studies.

        UNIV 1301 is a seminar designed to enhance the first-year experience for beginning college students and to increase student success in college. The varied content of the course will facilitate a smoother transition into the college culture. Content areas include: goal setting and time management skills, writing skills, test preparation and taking skills, critical thinking skills, major and career exploration, locating and utilizing campus resources, diversity awareness, wellness strategies, money management, and leadership/civic service awareness. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.


Foreign Languages Course Descriptions

      • FOLG 1401 Elementary Language I.

        First semester language is the first half of an elementary course on spoken and written language designed for beginning students. Credit 4.

      • FOLG 1402 Elementary Language II.

        Second semester language is an elementary course on spoken and written language designed for students that have some basic language knowledge, but want to improve their level in speaking, listening, writing and reading. This course can also expand on cultural knowledge. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FOLG 1401 or the equivalent. Credit 4.

      • FOLG 2303 Intermediate Language I.

        Third semester language emphasizes oral, listening, writing and reading skills. The class will include oral drills on pronunciation, as well as listening comprehension exercises. Additional activities will consist of reading exercises to improve intonation, pronunciation with the objective of making students comfortable and confident in speaking and writing correctly. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FOLG 1402 or the equivalent. Credit 3.

      • FOLG 2304 Intermediate Language II.

        Fourth semester language is a middle course on spoken and written language designed for students that have some basic language knowledge, but want to improve their level in speaking, listening, writing and reading. This course can also expand on cultural knowledge. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FOLG 2303 or the equivalent. Credit 3.

      • FOLG 2361 Individual Readings.

        This course is designed for the individual intermediate-level student who may need study of a particular era, genre, or author. Enrollment in this course is restricted and approval of such must be obtained from the department chair. The course may be repeated for credit as content varies. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FOLG 2304 or the equivalent. Credit 3.

      • FOLG 3361 Individual Readings.

        This course is designed for the individual advanced-level student who may need study of a particular era, genre, or author. Enrollment in this course is restricted and approval of such must be obtained from the department chair. The course may be repeated for credit as content varies. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FOLG 2304 or the equivalent. Credit 3.

      • FOLG 4363 Methods of Teaching Secondary Foreign Languages

        Methods of Teaching Secondary Foreign Languages is designed as a methods course in second language acquisition. This course will present information and materials for Second Language teachers that will enhance their teaching. Currently, SHSU does not offer this course, either in the Department of Foreign Languages or in the College of Education.


Forensic Science Course Descriptions

      • FORS 3331 Foundations of Forensic Anthropology I: Physical Anthropology.

        This course surveys the biology of humans from an anthropological perspective. It is a foundation course for students interested in anthropology, forensic anthropology, forensic nursing, medical school, or crime scene investigation. The course introduces the student to all four fields of anthropology: archaeology (prehistoric and historic human activity), cultural anthropology (past and contemporary cultures and cultural diversity), biological anthropology (primates, basic genetics, human evolution, and human biological diversity), and linguistics (language and communication) and how these fields are intertwined among themselves and to many aspects of criminology. The course content focuses predominantly on physical anthropology topics which correlate well with criminal justice issues as well as preparing students, interested in forensic anthropology, for more advanced topics in forensic anthropology. Credit 3.

      • FORS 3366 Forensic Science.

        This course introduces students to the process of analysis of forensic evidence and developments in crime scene techniques. Students will gain basic knowledge of and some practical experience in techniques concerning various types of evidence including fingerprint, impression, hair, fiber, trace, firearms, took marks, biological, accelerant, explosive, and drug. Credit 3.

      • FORS 3380 Introduction to Forensic Chemistry.

        This course provides an introduction to forensic chemistry. Current practices, technologies, and techniques will be discussed for some of the most common forensic chemistry disciplines. Prerequisites: FORS 3366, CHEM 2325. Credit 3.

      • FORS 3420 Human Osteology: The Analysis of Human Bone.

        This course thoroughly examines the human musculoskeletal system. The course covers the structure and function of bone including bone growth and development and the distinction between juvenile and adult skeletal elements. The course is designed to equip the student with thorough knowledge of the normal appearance of the human skeleton and its variation caused by population variation, genetic disorders, diseases, or trauma. Credit 4.

      • FORS 4077 Special Topics in Forensic Science.

        This course is designed to give advanced undergraduate students academic flexibility by allowing them to take structured courses on emerging topics or other matters about which there are no courses already approved in the catalog. Prerequisites: Senior Standing. Credit 1-4.

      • FORS 4310 Physical Evidence Techniques.

        This course provides an overview of physical evidence concepts and identification techniques. Pattern recognition of physical evidence, including fingerprints, bloodstains, gunshot residue, tire prints, shoeprints, fire investigation, firearms, and digital evidence will be discussed. The use of electronic databases in pattern evidence comparison will be addressed. Prerequisite FORS 3366. Credit 3.

      • FORS 4320 Fundamentals of Forensic Biology.

        This course explores fundamental principles of forensic biology including serology and DNA. Current technologies and procedures used within the field of forensic biology will be discussed. Prerequisites: FORS 3366, BIOL 2440, BIOL 3450. Credit 3.

      • FORS 4364 Crime Scene Investigation Techniques.

        This course provides a foundational overview of criminalistics from the standpoint of crime scene investigation. Theoretical understanding and hands-on experience in crime scene processing is provided. Basic criminalistic and laboratory techniques are introduced and discussed. Lab report design and interpretation of results are also included. Prerequisite FORS 3366. Credit 3.

      • FORS 4380 Ethics and Professional Practice.

        This course provides an overview of ethics and professional practice in forensic science. Ethical dilemmas, bias, and organizational culture will be explored. Prerequisite: FORS 3366. Credit 3.

      • FORS 4442 Introduction to Forensic Anthropology

        This course equips students with the methodologies and applications of forensic anthropology. The course includes extensive hands-on exercises working with the human skeletal system. Students will learn and apply the methods used in building the human biological profile, which includes the determination of sex, age, ancestry, and stature based on skeletal features. Students learn the biomechanics of bone and identify skeletal pathologies and/or trauma. Prerequsite: FORS 3420. Credit 4.


French Course Descriptions

      • FREN 1411 Elementary French I.

        For students who have no previous instruction in French. Introduction to French pronunciation, vocabulary, and basic language codes stressing an oral approach to the language with special emphasis on conversation and oral drill. Two one-hour language laboratory periods weekly are required, one of which is a concurrent lab class enrollment. For non-native speakers of French. Native speakers should take the CLEP or register for FREN 2312. Credit 4

      • FREN 1412 Elementary French II.

        This course is a continuation of FREN 1411. Language codes with more complexity are discussed and drilled. Stress is placed on aural and oral skills. Two one-hour language laboratory periods weekly are required, one of which is a concurrent lab class enrollment. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FREN 1411 or equivalent. For non-native speakers of French. Native French speakers should take the CLEP or register for FREN 2312. Credit 4.

      • FREN 2311 Intermediate French I.

        Readings of medium difficulty are used as a basis for reading and aural comprehension as well as for oral communication. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FREN 1412 or equivalent. For non-native speakers of French. Native French speakers should take the CLEP or register for FREN 2312. Credit 3.

      • FREN 2312 Intermediate French II.

        A continuation of FREN 2311 with special emphasis on practical needs for communication. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FREN 2311 or equivalent. Credit 3.

      • FREN 3364 Survey of French Literature.

        A detailed study of the various schools and periods of literature from the 16th century to modern times. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FREN 2312 or equivalent. Credit 3.

      • FREN 3365 French Grammar And Stylistics.

        A continuing emphasis on fluent usage of oral and written French. Intensive study of selected written work with the purpose of mastering mid-level proficiency skills. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FREN 2312 or equivalent. Credit 3.

      • FREN 3367 French Phonetics and Conversation.

        Basic theory of French pronunciation and intonation. With ample opportunity for drill, students achieve an intermediate level of oral proficiency. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FREN 2312 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

      • FREN 3380 French Culture and Civilization.

        A course to portray the overall picture of the role played by French culture and civilization throughout the world. This course will provide cultural background for French majors or minors. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FREN 2312 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

      • FREN 4075 Individual French Readings.

        This course is designed for the individual student who may need study of a particular era or genre or author. Enrollment in this course is restricted and approval for such must be obtained from the Program Coordinator. The course may be repeated for credit as content varies. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FREN 2312 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

      • FREN 4364 Modern French Usage and Conversation.

        A useful course for all levels, including those seeking oral proficiency. Emphasis is placed on extemporaneous speech and conversation dealing with modern topics. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FREN 2312 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

      • FREN 4370 Seminar In Selected Topics in Literature, Language, or Civilization.
        This course will be an in-depth study of a selected topic by which French majors and minors, tracking specific skills, may acquire the necessary knowledge of francophone culture and/or the ability to speak, read, and write the French language at an advanced level.  The topic to be explored will change from semester to semester.  The course may be repeated for credit as the content vaires.  Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in FREN 2312 or consent of Chair.  Credit 3.

      • FREN 4377 French for Business Communication.

        Specialized focus on vocabulary, expressions and language used in oral and written business communication in French. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: Grade C or better in FREN 2312 Credit 3.

      • FREN 4377 FFrancophone Literatures.

        A survey of the major topics in Francophone literatures and film from the French-speaking regions of the world. Conducted in French. Prerequisite: Grade C or better in FREN 2312 Credit 3


General Business Administration Course Descriptions

      • BUAD 1111 PGA/PGM Professional Development Lab.

        This course is designed to guide students through the completion of the Level 1 materials of the PGA of America’s Professional Golf Management Program. Only available to students enrolled in the PGA/PGM program. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 academic credit hours. The course is only available to PGA/PGM students. Credit 1.

      • BUAD 1305 Electronic Communications Techniques.

        This course is designed to develop student proficiency with business software. These skills include producing properly formatted business documents and reports, creating computerized spreadsheets for problem-solving and decision-making, and as a tool for preparing effective presentations. Credit 3.

      • BUAD 1301 Business Principles in an International Environment.

        A survey course of all the major business disciplines with an emphasis on helping define career objectives and supporting academic interest areas. An overview of what is involved in accounting, marketing, management, legal aspects of business, economics and finance. An ideal choice for non-business majors wanting to learn of opportunities in business and how to pursue them. Not open to business majors with junior or senior standing. Credit 3.

      • BUAD 2189 PGA/PGM Internship.

        A course designed to provide the student with an initial opportunity to apply academic skills in a practical work environment as required to complete the PGA/PGM Program. (See Internship Coordinator prior to enrolling.) All internships must be approved in advance in order to receive credit. The course may be repeated for a maximum of 2 hours of academic credit and is only available to PGA/PGM students. Credit 1.

      • BUAD 2321 Design and Presentation of Business Projects.

        The focus of this course is on designing and delivering effective business presentations. Topics include planning, developing, organizing, and delivering business presentations. Students will design/develop effective visual aids which will be used in their business presentations using computer-assisted programs. Credit 3.

      • BUAD 2301 Business Legal Environment.

        This course covers legal environment from a “preventive law”, practical perspective. Specific subjects include: Litigation, Alternative Dispute Resolution, Torts, Business Organizations, Real and Personal Property Law including Asset Protection-Estate Planning, and Administrative Law. The course provides an introduction to Environmental Law, Consumer Law, Securities Law, Human Resources Management Law (Labor Law), and Marketing Law (Anti-Trust). Credit 3.

      • BUAD 3169 Advanced PGA/PGM Professional Development Lab.

        This course is designed to guide students through the completion of Levels 2 and 3 materials of the PGA of America’s Professional Golf Management Program. Only available to students enrolled in the PGA/PGM program. May be repeated for a maximum of 4 academic credit hours. Credit 1.

      • BUAD 3189 PGA/PGM Internship III.

        A course designed to provide the student with additional opportunity to apply academic skills in a practical work environment as required to complete the PGA/PGM Program. (See Internship Coordinator prior to enrolling.) All internships must be approved in advance in order to receive credit. The course is only available to PGA/PGM students. Credit 1.

      • BUAD 3330 Office Application System.

        A study of the design and implementation of desktop publishing as a part of the management information system, with an emphasis on hands-on applications at the computer to develop proficiency level skills. Credit 3.

      • BUAD 3355 Business Law.

        The focus of this course is on areas of modern commercial law as needed by business professionals in conducting business transactions in buying and selling goods and services. Common Law Contracts and negotiation strategies are presented. An examination of the Uniform Commercial Code includes Sales Law, Leasing, Commercial Paper - Negotiable Instruments, Commercial Storage and Distribution of Goods, and Transfer of Securities. Creditor’s rights and U.S. Federal Bankruptcy Code are also covered. Credit 3.

      • BUAD 3335 Business Communications.

        Communication as a management tool in business and a personal skill with emphasis on the logical and psychological development of routine messages and reports. Prerequisite: Ability to use a word processing package. Credit 3.

      • GBA 365 BUAD 3336 Successful Workplace Relationships.

        This course is designed to provide the foundation for the development of successful workplace relationships. The course includes an overview of social and emotional intelligence skills that are most commonly used by successful business professionals. Skills are introduced for managing personal ethics, conflict, and trust, which are essential for managing and leading in the business environment. Credit: 3

      • BUAD 3345 Global Entrepreneurship and Innovation.

        Provides an overview of theories of entrepreneurship, the process of creating wealth an public policies that encourage new venture formation and economic growth. Credit 3.

      • BUAD 3360 Human Resources Management Law.

        Designed for those seeking management positions and human resource management specialists, this course covers employment law with particular emphasis on Federal Laws on discrimination, compensation and promotion issues, worker safety, and employment benefits. Taught from a “preventive law” perspective, students acquire skills needed to keep abreast of the changing legal environment for employers and employees. Sexual harassment, affirmative action, workers compensation, worker safety and practical overview of employment manuals and procedures provide valuable information for future employees, managers or business owners. Credit 3. Typically offered only during fall semesters.

      • BUAD 3365 Real Estate Law.

        This course covers the legal aspects of real estate including the legal principles and legal instruments used in real estate transactions. Credit 3.

      • BUAD 4111 Professional Development.

        A course to prepare students for the professional job search and for professional conduct on the job so individuals can advance in their chosen careers. Credit 1.

      • BUAD 4289 PGA/PGM Internship IV.

        A course designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply advanced academic skills in a practical work environment as required to complete the PGA/PGM Program. (See Internship Coordinator prior to enrolling.) The course is only available to PGA/PGM students. Credit 2.

      • BUAD 4335 Intercultural Business Communication.

        This course prepares students for the complex leadership roles and communication tasks they will encounter in an increasingly multicultural, global work environment. The course familiarizes students with the cultural impacts on global business; managing culturally diverse work forces, transitions, relocations, diversity and performance; and explores cultures specifics of various countries. Credit 3.

      • BUAD 4340 International Business Law.

        An overview of the international legal environment from a commercial and entrepreneurial perspective. This course examines the implications of international laws on foreign investment, intellectual property, sales contracts, money and banking, financing of enterprises, labor regulation and hiring, taxation, and dispute settlement. Credit 3.

      • BUAD 4345 Entrepreneurial Growth/Harvest.

        This course covers the growth and harvest/exit phases of an entrepreneurial business. It focuses on the challenges faced by such businesses as they move beyond startup. Students learn how to create value by growing a business profitable, and how to harvest the value through an appropriate exit strategy. Prerequisite: BUAD 3345. Credit 3.

      • BUAD 4348 Entrepreneurship.

        Designed for the aspiring entrepreneur or for those who are curious as to how wealth is created in a free market economy, this course provides a practical experience of how to evaluate business opportunities, how ventures are started with little or no capital, how wealth is realized, and how to develop innovative entrepreneurial skills and planning techniques to minimize the cost of experience. By the end of the course, students develop their own Personal Entrepreneurs Plan useful in focusing the direction of their personal careers. Prerequisite: BAUD 3345. Credit 3.

      • BUAD 4375 Legal Topics.

        An in-depth look at various areas in the law that are of special interest to students of different majors. May be repeated as topics change. Credit 3.

      • BUAD 4380 Problems in Business.

        An opportunity for the student to design a course, perhaps on a topic not offered or to more deeply investigate a subject of personal interest. A faculty member will be teamed up on a one-to-one basis to customize a project. Prerequisites: 30 hours in Business Administration and the consent of the department chair. May be taken for the Academic Distinction Program. Credit 1, 2, or 3.

      • BUAD 4389 Internship.

        A course designed to provide the student with an opportunity to apply academic skills in a practical work environment. (See Internship Coordinator prior to enrolling.) All internships must be approved in advance in order to receive credit. The course may be repeated one time for a maximum of 6 hours. Credit 3.


Geology Course Descriptions

      • GEOL 1403 Physical Geology.

        An introduction to the materials, processes, and structure of the earth. Topics include earthquakes, volcanoes, plate tectonics, mountain building, weathering and erosion, glaciation, oceans, and mineral resources. The laboratory taken concurrently with the lecture includes experiences that involve the study of rocks, minerals, and map interpretations. No prerequisite. Fall, Spring, Summer. Credit 4.

      • GEOL 1404 Historical Geology.

        An introduction to the history of the earth and its past inhabitants, including a section on the dinosaurs and their extinction. This course gives a broad overview of the tectonic evolution of the planet, indicated by various major mountain-building events; ancient environments and changing sea levels recorded in sedimentary deposits; and the evolution of life represented by the fossil record. The laboratory taken concurrently with the lecture includes the study of common animal and plant fossils and problems which illustrate practical applications of geological principles. Prerequisite: GEOL 1403 or GEOL 1405. Fall, Spring, Summer. Credit 4.

      • GEOL 1405 Geologic Hazards and Resources.

        AAn introduction to the interrelationship between humans and the geologic environment. This includes the potential hazards posed by geologic processes, and the planning that needs to be done to lessen their impact. Earth materials and their uses by humans are also emphasized. The laboratory taken concurrently with the lecture includes map and air photo interpretation, analysis of remote sensing data, and study of economically important earth materials. Field trips and take-home computer exercises are also required. No prerequisite. Fall, Spring, Summer. Credit 4.

      • GEOL 3301 Field Methods.

        This course provides experience with common field techniques used in geologic mapping and geologic investigations. It emphasizes techniques and skills used for systematic field observations and data collection for construction of stratigraphic columns, structural cross-sections, and the development of geologic maps. The course has a mandatory two-week field component. Prerequisites: GEOL 1403 or GEOL 1405 plus GEOL 1404. Credit: 3.

      • GEOL 3304 Geochemistry.

        A general introduction to all types of geochemistry that includes a discussion of the underlying chemical concepts, with an emphasis on the applications to geological environments. The chemical concepts include isotopic chemistry, thermodynamics, crystal chemistry, and aqueous solutions. The geological concepts include metasomatism, geothermobarometry, and environmental geochemistry. Prerequisites: GEOL 3404. Spring. Credit 3.

      • GEOL 3326 Environmental Geology.

        This course offers an introduction to geological processes and materials, and how they affect people and the environment. Specific topics include earthquakes, volcanism, mass wasting, floods, coastal hazards, and climatic change. Optional topics may include such items as energy and water resources, subsidence, and waste disposal. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisites: GEOL 1403 or GEOL 1405. Credit 3.

      • GEOL 3330 Oceanography.

         A survey of the general principles of oceanography is made. The geology of ocean basins, tide-water processes and the chemistry of sea water are studied. Biophysics of the sea and environmental problems are considered. Prerequisites: GEOL 1403 or GEOL 1405. Credit 3.

      • GEOL 3332 Forensic Geology.

        The course covers many of the basic geological principles and techniques used in solving crime. A significant part of the course will involve case studies as well as hands-on field and laboratory analyses. Prerequisite: GEOL 1403 or GEOL 1405 plus CHEM 1411 and CHEM 1412. Credit 3.

      • GEOL 3404 Mineralogy.

        This course covers crystallography, genesis of minerals, identification and classification of minerals, and optical mineralogy. Prerequisites: GEOL 1403 or 1405 plus GEOL 1404, CHEM 1411, CHEM 1412, MATH 1316 or 1410. Includes lab work. Writing Enhanced. Fall. Credit 4.

      • GEOL 3405 Petrology.

        The classification, origin, occurrence and associations of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Includes optical petrology using thin sections. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: GEOL 3404. Spring. Credit 4.

      • GEOL 4312 Economic Geology.

        This course is concerned with the origin and occurrence of economically important minerals. A portion of the course is devoted to petroleum. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisites: GEOL 1403 or 1405 plus GEOL 1404. Odd year Spring. Credit 3.

      • GEOL 4320 Petroleum Geology.

        This course reviews the origin and development of petroleum and natural gas deposits, and surveys the various tools used to prospect for commercial deposits of oil and natural gas. Prerequisites: GEOL 4402. Credit: 3.

      • GEOL 4331 Geology of North America.

        A study of the geologic history of the continent of North America. Topics include paleogeography, major depositional areas and stratigraphic units, and paleotectonics. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisites: GEOL 1303/1103, GEOL 1304/1104. Even year Spring. Credit 3.

      • GEOL 4337 Plate Tectonics.

        An introduction to the movement of lithospheric plates. Topics to be covered include earthquakes, volcanism, seismic tomography, the evolution of continents and ocean basins, and the influence of the earth’s interior on these processes. Lecture only. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisites: GEOL 1403 or 1405 plus GEOL 1404. Credit 3.

      • GEOL 4400 Stratigraphy and Sedimentation.

        A study of the principles and methods used in describing, classifying and correlating strata. Includes studies of modern and ancient depositional environments. Lab/field work included. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisites: GEOL 3301 and GEOL 3405. Credit 4.

      • GEOL 4402 Structural Geology.

        This course covers the principles of deformation of the Earth’s lithosphere, with emphasis on mechanical principles, identification and interpretation of structures from the microscopic scale to the scale of mountain belts. Other topics include regional tectonics and application in petroleum exploration. Lab work will focus on graphical and quantitative techniques of analyzing geologic structures. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisites: GEOL 4400, PHYS 1301/1101 and PHYS 1302/1102. Credit 4.

      • GEOL 4413 Methods in Applied Geophysics.

        Applied Geophysics involves measurements made on the surface of the Earth that are interpreted to yield the distribution of subsurface properties, particularly those having economic and engineering importance. This course provides an introduction to the latest methods used to map the distribution of physical properties beneath the surface of the Earth, and is widely recommended for students who plan to pursue careers that directly or indirectly involve subsurface imaging and analysis. Prerequisites: GEOL 4402, MATH 1420. Credit 3.

      • GEOL 4414 Sea Level Change and the Geological Record.

        This course will examine the various modern causes of relative and absolute sea level change. The course also will involve the analysis of ancient geological sedimentary and stratigraphic records from the perspective of what they reveal about rates and scales of sea level change in the past, as well as implications for the future. Sequence stratigraphic concepts (commonly used in the petroleum industry) will be critically examined via field-based, and paper and core-based studies. Prerequisites: GEOL 4400. Credit 4.

      • GEOL 4426 Hydrogeology.

        An introduction to the study of groundwater and its role in the hydrologic cycle. Topics include properties and distribution of water on the surface, in the vadose zone and in aquifers; behavior, modeling, and geology of groundwater aquifers; human use and abuse of water resources, including groundwater contamination and extraction; and water law economics, and aquatic ecology. A lab with field trips will focus on measurement and modeling of groundwater. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisites: GEOL 3301. Credit 4.

      • GEOL 4360, 4361 Field Geology.

        These courses will consist of on-site studies in structure, stratigraphy, petrology and paleontology. Field trips will be taken to appropriate areas in Texas and/or surrounding states. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Credit 3 hours for each course.

      • GEOL 4095 Special Topics in Geology.

        Individual study in special areas of geology. Topic content will usually be selected and agreed upon by the student and a member of the Geology faculty. Sometimes special topics courses will be offered by the Geology faculty. This course may be taken for Academic Distinction credit. See Academic Distinction Program in this catalog. Prerequisites and credit will be determined by the faculty member. May be repeated for credit. Writing Enhanced. Fall, Spring, Summer. Credit 1, 2, or 3.


Geography Course Descriptions

      • GEOG 1321 People, Places, and Environment.

        The basic concepts of meteorology and climatology are introduced. Atmospheric temperature, pressure, winds, moisture, and air masses and storms are systematically covered, followed by an overview of the major climates and ecosystems of the earth. Environmental problems related to weather, climate, and ecosystems are considered throughout. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 1401 Weather and Climate Lecture and Laboratory.

        The basic concepts of meteorology and climatology are introduced. Atmospheric temperature, pressure, winds, moisture, and air masses and storms are systematically covered, followed by an overview of the major climates and ecosystems of the earth. Environmental problems related to weather, climate, and ecosystems are considered throughout. The lab portion of weather and climate is an activity-related treatment of the basic components of meteorology and climatology. Specific topics covered are similar to the lecture. Credit 4.

      • GEOG 2301 Environmental Geography

        Environmental Geography is a study of the spatial dimensions of the interaction between humans and their physical environment. Key principles of how the earth and the earth’s ecosystems work, how they are interconnected, and how humans use and impact these natural resource systems will be introduced. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 2355 World Regional Geography: Europe, Asia, and Australia.

        An introductory level course giving a general overview of the land and people. Topics discussed will include the physical environment, cultural characteristics and the various ways people live and make their living. Attention will be focused upon the relationships which exist between location, the physical environment and human activity. Examples of countries covered are Russia, Germany, France, China, Japan, and United Kingdom. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 2356 World Regional Geography: Latin America, Africa, and South Asia.

        An introductory level course giving a general overview of the land and people. Topics discussed will include the physical environment, cultural characteristics and the various ways people live and make their living. Attention will be focused upon the relationships which exist between location, the physical environment and human activity. Examples of countries covered are Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Egypt, Republic of South Africa, Israel, Iran, and India. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 2364 Geo-Spatial Technology.

        An introduction to technologies, such as geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS), that are used to map and study the Earth. The emphasis is on the application of these technologies in areas of environmental and natural resources management, business and marketing, and law enforcement and national security. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 2464 Geo-Spatial Technology.

        This course will introduce basics of geographic information systems (GIS) with an emphasis on environmental and resource management applications. Students will design and develop a digital spatial database, perform spatial analyses, create hardcopy maps, and generate reports. Students will be introduced to several GIS software packages. This course does incorporate a laboratory component. Writing Enhanced. Credit 4.

      • GEOG 3350 Cultural Geography.

        This course focuses on the concept of culture from a spatial or geographical perspective, examining culture as it relates to the geographic landscape. Topics include the spatial dynamics of language, religion, race, ethnicity, music, sport, folk and popular cultures, and the built environment. The course also provides an examination of symbolic landscapes, contested spaces, subaltern geographies, representations of place in film and literature, gendered spaces, and place-situated identities. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 3352 Tourism Geography.

        Provides an introduction to the geography of tourism. Topics include the historical development of travel and tourism, place promotion, location of tourism destinations, geographic resources of tourism, and the physical and social outcomes of tourism. Prerequisites: GEOG 1321 or GEOG 2355 or GEOG 2356. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 3358 Historical Geography of the United States.

        A survey of the changing geography of the United States including initial exploration, European perception of North America, geographical expansion of the United States to the Pacific, and geographical factors underlying the urbanization and industrialization of the nation. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3

      • GEOG 3359 Regional Geography: United States and Canada.

        This course provides a general overview of the land and people of the United States and Canada. Topics covered include the physical environment (weather patterns, landforms and water resources), cultural differences, and the various ways people live and make their living. Attention is focused upon the relationships which exist between location, the physical environment and human activity. This course is available on-line and via traditional classroom delivery. Traditional classroom sections are Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 3362 Map Use and Map Interpretation.

        This course teaches students how to use and interpret topographic maps and helps them to develop an appreciation of their use as tools by geographers. It familiarizes students with map projections and their limitations, various coordinate systems, map measurements, GPS, and the basics of air photo interpretation. Credit 3. This course teaches students how to use and interpret topographic maps and helps them to develop an appreciation of their use as tools by geographers. It familiarizes students with map projections and their limitations, various coordinate systems, map measurements, GPS, and the basics of air photo interpretation. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 3363 Computer Cartography.

        Fundamentals of thematic mapping, including appropriate usage, projections, base-map compilation, data measurement and analysis, map design and construction, color principles, and other cartographic concepts will be emphasized. Prerequisites: GEOG 2464. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 3364 Geo-Spatial Technology.

        An introduction to technologies, such as geographic information systems (GIS) and global positioning systems (GPS), that are used to map and study the Earth. The emphasis is on the application of these technologies in areas of environmental and natural resources management, business and marketing, and law enforcement and national security. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 4075 Readings in Geography.

        A course designed specifically for advanced students of geography who are capable of independent study. Registration is permitted only upon approval of the program coordinator. This course may be taken for Academic Distinction credit. See Academic Distinction Program in this catalog. Writing Enhanced. Credit 1-3.

      • GEOG 4331 Conservation of Natural Resources.

        This course stresses the impact of human activities on the natural world, environmental protection, and the wise use of the earth’s resources. Topics include: environmental history, economics, law and ethics, ecology, population issues, agriculture and grazing, soil conservation, forestry, endangered and exotic species, water availability and water pollution, hazardous and solid waste management, air pollution (including global warming), energy resources (fossil, nuclear, and renewable), and the impact of technology on the future health of the planet. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 4432 Geomorphology.

        This course focuses on surficial geological processes and the resulting landforms. Specific topics include landscape processes associated with streams, glaciers, wind, coasts, mass wasting, weathering and soil development, and geologic structure. Labs emphasize landform analysis through interpretation of topographic maps and aerial photos. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: GEOL 1403. Two-hour laboratory. Credit 4.

      • GEOG 4333 Field Studies.

        Use of geospatial technologies such as Global Positioning Systems (GPS), laser surveying, digital aerial photography and computerized mapping (GIS) will be stressed. Applications of these technologies will include surveying, water resources, forestry, soil science, wetlands delineation, urban and transportation planning, automobile accident reconstruction and crime scene evidence recovery. Half of the class meetings will take place at a variety of outdoor locations. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 4351 Economic Geography.

        An examination of the importance of location to human activity. The locational characteristics of primary, secondary, and tertiary economic activities are examined, with an emphasis on land use and urban form, its theory, and descriptive analysis, as well as an explanation of market forces and their consequences. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 4356 Urban Geography.

        This course will introduce the scope and nature of urban areas from a geographical or spatial perspective. The course will focus on the spatial structure of urban areas and will examine the geography of cities using an urban systems approach. Emphasis will be placed on the North American city and its problems: land use, transportation, political fragmentation, physical environment, demographic and social change, economic dynamics, residential patterns, urban culture, poverty, etc. Trends in urbanization in both developed and developing worlds will be discussed. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisites: GEOG 1321 or GEOG 2355 or GEOG 2356. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 4357 Population Geography.

        Population geography examines spatial patterns and processes influencing the distribution, density, composition, and growth in human populations. The course will focus on migration, and to a lesser extent on fertility and mortality together with socio-economic, political, and environmental causes and consequences of population dynamics that vary between regions and over time. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 4358 Geography of Texas

        A survey of the regional geography of Texas. Consideration is given to the significance of primary and secondary activity within the state, urbanization, and potential for development. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 4359 Transportation Geography.

        This course introduces the concepts, theories, and methods of transportation geography. It covers transportation infrastructure, modes of terminals, transportation economics, urban transportation, logistics, and transportation planning. In addition, this course covers various analytical techniques applied in transportation analysis, such as network analysis, gravity models, location-allocation modeling, and geographic information systems in transportation studies. Prerequisites: GEOG 1321, GEOG 2355, GEOG 2356 or permission of instructor. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 4360 Cultural Field Study.

        This course focuses on a number of topics and concepts that fall within the sub-discipline of cultural geography. Students engage in place-based learning, with the primary emphasis being a field experience that directly exposes students to processes and concepts introduced and discussed in the classroom. These include migration, urbanization, economic transformations, demographic change, social and technological change, racial segregation, civil rights, heritage tourism and other topics. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: 6 GEOG advanced hours or permission of instructor. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 4464 Introduction to Geographic Information Systems.

        This course will introduce basics of geographic information systems (GIS) with an emphasis on environmental and resource management applications. Students will design and develop a digital spatial database, perform spatial analyses, create hardcopy maps, and generate reports. Students will be introduced to several GIS software packages. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 4365 Applied Geographic Information Systems.

        Applied GIS is designed to meet the needs for a highly applied course with realistic practical training extending the fundamental principles learned in Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GEOG 2464). The application of GIS technology to mapping, modeling and management of large data bases will be emphasized. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: GEOG 2464. Credit 3.

      • GEOG 4468 Remote Sensing.

        This course introduces students to the methods used to analyze and interpret aerial photography and satellite imagery. Emphasis is placed on multispectral satellite imagery, digital image processing, and land use and land cover analysis using remotely sensed imagery. Lab included. Credit 4.


German Course Descriptions

      • GERM 1411 Elementary German I.

        For students who have had no previous instruction in German. The work includes vocabulary acquisition, international cultural components, pronunciation, drills, sentence formation, and everyday conversation leading to proficiency. Two one-hour language laboratory periods weekly are required, one of which is a concurrent lab class enrollment. Credit 4.

      • GERM 1412 Elementary German II.

        A continuation of GERM 1411 with more speaking and writing toward advancing proficiency. Two one-hour language laboratory periods weekly are required, one of which is a concurrent lab class enrollment. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in GERM 1411 or equivalent. Credit 4.

      • GERM 2311 Intermediate German I.

        A continuation of GERM 1412 with emphasis on written and oral skills. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in GERM 1412 or equivalent. Credit 3.

      • GERM 2312 Intermediate German II.

        A continuing emphasis on fluent usage of oral and written German. Intensive study of selected written work with the purpose of mastering midlevel proficiency skills. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in GERM 2311 or equivalent. Credit 3.

      • GERM 2364 Multicultures of America: German.

        A survey course designed to increase an awareness of Central- European culture in America with particular emphasis on the nineteenth and the twentieth centuries. This course may be conducted in English or German. Credit for this course may be applied to the major or minor only with permission of department chair. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in GERM 2312 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

      • GERM 3368 German Media.

        Study of German Media. Focus on conversational, listening, reading, and vocabulary skills. Students will watch German television programs and will read articles from major German magazines and newspapers. Includes a review of German grammar. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in GERM 2312 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

      • GERM 3380 Modern German Culture.

        An overview of the cultures of German speaking countries (Germany, Austria, and Switzerland) from 1780 to the present. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in GERM 2312 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

      • GERM 4075 Individual Readings in German.

        This course is designed for the individual student who may need study of a particular era, genre, or author. Enrollment in this course is restricted and approval of such must be obtained from the department chair. The course may be repeated for credit as content varies. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in GERM 2312 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

      • GERM 4360 Modern German Literature.

        An overview of the literatures of German-speaking countries (Germany, Austria, and Switzerland) from 1770 to the present. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in GERM 2312 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

      • GERM 4370 Seminar in Selected German Topics.

        An in-depth study of a selected topic. The topic to be explored will change from year to year. This course may be repeated for credit as the content varies. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in GERM 2312 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.


Health Education Course Descriptions

      • HLTH 1360 Introduction to Health Education and Health Careers.

        This course explores the determinants of health, theories of health behavior, the nature and history of health education, and the role of the health educator as a professional in the school, work, clinical, and community settings to promote health and prevent disease. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 1366 Lifestyle and Wellness.

        Lifestyle and Wellness explores a variety of health issues which influence the well-being of an individual throughout the life cycle. The student is given an opportunity to develop a personal philosophy of wellness and self-responsibility for health through self-assessment, investigation of factors affecting one’s health, and the examination of behavior modification strategies. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 2330 First Aid: Red Cross and Instructor’s Course.

        A course for those who wish to acquire knowledge of Red Cross emergency and preventive measures. Successful completion leads to CPR, first aid, and responding to emergency certification. Students may also become instructors through additional American Red Cross training. (Also listed as KINE 2330). Credit 3.

      • HLTH 2372 Health and Medical Terminology.

        This course provides medically-oriented students with the cognitive skills they need to understand the foundations of medical technology for health professionals. The content of this course focuses on the prefixes, suffixes, and roots of medical terms that are associated with multiple disease processes, medical protocols, and the human anatomical system. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 2381 Consumer Health Education.

        A study of the factors which influence the consumer marketplace for health related products and services. Topics include fraud and quackery, advertising, health care professional services, alternative medicine, consumer protection agencies, and consumer protection through self-responsibility. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 2383 Multicultural Health Issues.

        This course addressed health issues and problems that various ethnic groups face in the United States. Cultural differences in health behaviors, health care access, and promotion and prevention programs are emphasized. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 3380 Drug Use and Abuse.

        This course explores the use and misuse of drugs and their effects on the health of man. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 3382 Child and Adolescent Health.

        This course focuses on the causes of and approaches to physical, social, mental, and emotional health problems among young people. Emphasis is placed on creating an environment in which children and adolescents can learn to make prudent decisions regarding health related behaviors. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 3385 Safety Education.

        This course presents the foundations of accident prevention and injury control. Applications are made to motor vehicle, home, recreational, and occupational safety. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 3390 Family Life and Sex Education.

        This course focuses on the formation of intimate relationships: family, marriage, and friends. Individuals are directed into the study of their personal backgrounds, lives, and dreams in preparation for marriage. Includes problems of relationships: rape, battering partners, sexually transmitted diseases, and divorce. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 3391 Study of Human Diseases.

        Introduction to the relationship between the human body and disease, both communicable and non-communicable. Includes historical aspects of various diseases, etiology, prevention and control, prevalence, symptoms, and treatment. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 3392 Communication Skills for Health Education.

        An exploration of different modalities of communicating health issues and information to audiences in different settings. Emphasis is given to listening, writing and speaking skills. Students will learn how to make effective presentations using computer applications to design print and visual aid materials. Prerequisites: HLTH 1360 and HLTH 1366, 3 hours of CS. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 4360 Health Education Research: Methodology and Statistics.

        An introduction to research methodology, evaluation, and statistical analysis with direct application to health education and health promotion. Students will learn how to apply these techniques to writing a grant proposal. Prerequisites: Junior standing, 9 hours of health courses, MATH 1369. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 4361 Managing Health Promotion in the Workplace.

        A course designed to prepare the health educator to establish special programs which promote health in corporate, occupational, or industrial settings. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 4370 AIDS: Current Health Problems and Prevention Strategies.

        An examination of the intensity and magnitude of health problems due to HIV and AIDS. Student will explore the nature of HIV; its transmission and progression; and the management of AIDS. The course will focus on prevention of the spread of AIDS among school-age children and young adults, and will address the economical, sociological, and ethical issues of AIDS. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 4387 Community Health.

        This course is an overview of the political, social, economic, and cultural variables affecting the health of a community. Topics include: foundations of community health, health resources, health through the life span, governmental and voluntary programs, and international health initiatives. Prerequisite: Junior Standing. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 4390 Environmental Health.

        This course is designed to investigate community environmental health problems. Topics include population problems, housing, sanitation, air and water pollution, and other environmental health issues. Emphasis is on school-community action programs to conserve the environment. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 4392 Problems in Health.

        A directed individual study of an approved field problem in health and/or allied fields. Prerequisites: HLTH 4393 and departmental approval. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 4393 Principles and Practices of Community Organization and Community Development.

        This course is designed to prepare students for their professional internship. Course content focuses on the contemporary areas of: assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating health programs; communicating health needs; serving as a resource person; and coordinating health needs in a community. Prerequisite: 12 hours of Health including HLTH 4387. Credit 3.

      • HLTH 4394 Internship Program.

        This course provides the student with opportunities to demonstrate assessment, organization, group process and program planning skills in a health community setting. Prerequisites: 18 hours of Health including HLTH 4393. Credit 3.


History Course Descriptions

      • HIST 1301 United States History to 1876.

        The colonial origins of the United States and growth of the Republic to 1876. Credit 3.

      • HIST 1302 United States History since 1876.

        Continuing survey of the United States to the present. Credit 3.

      • HIST 2311 World History from the Dawn of Civilization through the Middle Ages.

        A survey of world history from the dawn of civilization in Mesopotamia, China, India, Egypt, and Mesoamerica through the Middle Ages in Europe and Asia. The Middle Ages, Renaissance, and Reformation, as well as the rise of nation states and the commercial economy are stressed as background to modern history. Recommended as a basic history course for all liberal arts majors. Credit 3.

      • HIST 2312 World History from the Renaissance to the Age of Imperialism.

        A survey of world history since sixteenth century. Special attention is given to European expansion overseas, imperialism and colonization, the Industrial Revolution, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, nineteenth century nationalism and democracy, and the colonial rebellions in Africa, Latin America, and Asia. Such 20th century problems as World War I, World War II, the Cold War, and the collapse of the Soviet Union are also considered. Recommended as the second half of a basic history course for all liberal arts majors. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3331 Early Asian History.

        A study of Asian history from its beginnings to the fourteenth century. The emphasis is on the social and political foundations of traditional Asian society and the historical influences of religion on Asian culture. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3332 Modern Asian History.

        A study of Asian history since the fourteenth century. The emphasis is on the modernization of Asia and the influence of colonization, nationalism, and industrialization on present-day Asia. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3333 Religion in World History.

        This course will examine the origins, development, and modern manifestations of the major living world religions. It will discuss the peoples, times and places of the founders of each tradition, the classical literature within each tradition and the canonization of these sacred writings, and the significant sects and schisms within the religions that have influenced major events in world history. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3334 Renaissance Europe.

        This course examines the intellectual, political, social and cultural history of Europe from the 14th to 16th centuries, a period that saw, starting in Italy, a “rebirth” of the values and culture of Classical Greco-Roman civilization. The primary focus will be on intellectual and artistic movements, and the profound implications these had for European values, worldview, politics, and art. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3335 Germany and Central Europe since 1815.

        A study of German and Central European history, emphasizing the principal political, economic and social trends since the Congress of Vienna. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3336 Middle East since 1700.

        This course will study the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the Middle East since the seventeenth century. The course will study such topics as the decline of traditional empires; the encroachment of Europe; the Eastern Question; the development of nationalism among the Turks, Arabs, and Iranians; Islam and modern ideologies; and the Middle East in the twentieth century. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3337 Reformation Europe.

        This course examines the religious, social and cultural history of Europe from the 16th into the 17th centuries, a period that saw the fracturing of a unified Christendom. The primary focus will be on religious and theological changes and the profound implications these had for European politics, social norms, cultural values, and economic endeavors. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3338 Economic History from the Industrial Revolution to the Present.

        This course examines the Industrial Revolution as it came into being in Britain in the nineteenth century and as leadership passed to the United States in the twentieth. Topics discussed include the relationship between agriculture and industry, the rise of the corporation, the development of the international monetary system, and systems of trade. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3339 The French Revolution & Napoleonic Era, 1789-1815.

        This course examines the history of France during the French Revolution & Napoleonic Era, 1789-1815. The course is focused primarily on the military and political history of the era, with a detailed examination of the battles and campaigns of the Napoleonic Wars. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3340 Mexican Americans Since 1848.

        This course considers the history of Mexican-Americans in what is now the United States Southwest. The course begins with the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo that ended the war between the United States and Mexico and created a Mexican-American minority within the U.S. It covers such themes as the indigenous background of this population, the Chicana/o perception of the Southwest as a homeland, and the effect of that perception on the history of this ethnic group. Prerequisite: None. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3350 Early Christianities.

        This course is an interdisciplinary and cross-cultural examination of central themes in the history of early Christianities beginning with the transformation of the Jesus Movement into a separate Christian religion and concluding with the divisions made permanent by the Fourth Crusade. Prerequisite: None. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3358 Silk Roads to the Atlantic World.

        This course is an interdisciplinary investigation of the contexts, impulses, and implications of long-distance interplay among cultures in both pre-modern and modern times. Students will apply scholarly models of cross-cultural interactions using three specific case studies: the ancient Silk Roads, the trans-Eurasian Mongol Empire, and the trans- Atlantic Columbian Exchange. Prerequisite: None. Credits 3.

      • HIST 3360 American Religious History.

        A study of selected themes bearing on the relation of religion and culture in America from colonial times to the present. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3361 The United States and the Vietnam War.

        The course will focus on the United States involvement in Southeast Asia from 1945 to 1975. In particular, it will deal with the issues of nationalism and communism in Southeast Asia, the first Indochina war between the French and Vietnamese, the United States military effort in Indochina from 1965 to 1975, and the postwar political, economic, and social problems in the region. The course will also deal with the impact of the Vietnam War on American culture and foreign policy. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3362 The Middle East 500 - 1700.

        This course will study the political, social, economic, and cultural development of the Middle East from the eve of the rise of Islam through the seventeenth century. The course will address such general topics as the following: the Middle East before Islam; the Rise of Islam; the faith and practices of Islam; the Rightly-Guided Caliphs; Shiiah and Sunni Islam; the Umayyad and Abbasid Caliphates; the Crusades and Islam; Islam and the Steppe Empires; the rise and apogee of the Ottoman Empire; and Islam’s initial response to the encroachment of the west. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3363 Britain to 1714.

        This course traces the development of the British peoples from prehistoric times to the end of the Stuart dynasty. While English dominance is a theme, the course also covers the peoples of Wales, Scotland and Ireland. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3364 Modern Britain, 1714 to Present.

        A continuation of HIS363, emphasizing the effects of industrial change, the enmity of France in foreign affairs, Great Britain’s renewed expansion overseas following the American Revolution, movements favoring social and economic reform, and political trends to the present. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3365 Russian History.

        Explores the roots of Russia (Kiev, Christianity, the Mongol occupation, Ivan the Terrible, the Times of Troubles), then surveys Russian history from Peter the Great to the present. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3367 Europe in the Age of Absolutism and Revolution, 1648-1815.

        Europe in the Age of Absolutism and Revolution. A study of significant issues in European history from 1648 to 1815. The course focuses on developments in political theory, natural science and economics as well as the tensions in the old social order which helped instigate the French Revolution. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3368 European History, 1815-1914.

        The history of the principal European powers from the Congress of Vienna to World War I. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3369 The World in the Twentieth Century.

        A study of global politics and diplomacy since World War I. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3370 Ancient History.

        The history of the civilizations of the Ancient Near East, Greece, and Rome with special emphasis upon their contribution to the cultural heritage of the western world. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3371 Medieval History.

        A study of the political, economic, social, intellectual, and religious institutions and developments in Europe from the collapse of the Roman Empire in the fifth century to the Renaissance. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3372 Historiography.

        Special emphasis is devoted to a survey of historical interpretations and to the development of research skills. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3373 Topics in the History of Science and Medicine.

        This course will examine selected topics in the history of science and medicine. Emphasis will be placed on the development of scientific knowledge across the centuries. Because the geographic regions, time frame, and topics will vary from semester to semester, with departmental approval, This course may be repeated for credit. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3376 Early America to 1783.

        An examination of early American history from the beginnings of European colonization through the American Revolution and the War for American Independence. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3377 America in Mid-Passage, 1783-1877.

        The course examines United States history from 1783 to 1877 and studies the origins of the U.S. Constitution, the early republic and rise of the two party-system, the nature of Jeffersonian and Jacksonian democracy, the sectional crisis and the Civil War, and the era of Reconstruction. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3378 The Emergence of Modern America, 1877-1945.

        This course will examine United States history from 1877 to 1945 and will include discussions of the Industrial Revolution, the Populist and Progressive movements, World War I, the era of the 1920s, the Great Depression and New Deal, and World War II. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3379 Recent America, 1945 to the Present.

        This course will examine United States history from the end of World War II to the present and will include discussions of the Cold War; the civil rights and environmental movements; the Vietnam War, the Gulf War, and the war on global terrorism; the public policy debates surrounding the role of the federal government in the modern economy; and the evolution of American popular culture. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3380 The American Civil War.

        This course examines the sectional conflicts of the 1850s, the Civil War and Reconstruction. The course focuses on the military, political, social and diplomatic history of the era. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3381 British Empire and Commonwealth.

        The study of the British Empire and Commonwealth to the present time. Special emphasis is given to the rise of colonial and dominion nationalism, the imperial conferences, and the unfolding of the British Commonwealth of Nations. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3382 Immigration and Ethnicity in American History.

        A study of ethnic group relations, nativism, and racism in the historical development of American civilization, with special emphasis on the patterns of assimilation and non-assimilation of particular ethnic groups. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3383 American Women’s History.

        An examination of American women’s history, focusing on everyday concerns (including work, marriage, family, sexuality, reproduction, and education) and on the social forces which have aided or blocked change in women’s roles in American society. Particular attention is paid to differences in race, class, and ethnicity. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3384 Family and Childhood in the Atlantic World, 1500-1800.

        This course explores how encounters among Indians, Africans, and Europeans during the early modern period transformed the structure, relationships, and experiences of families and children.  Special emphasis is given to primary historical research and the effect of cross-cultural developments on shaping notions of race, gender, and sexuality in the Atlantic World.  Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.  Credit 3.

      • HIST 3385 American Diplomatic History.

        A study of selected topics in American Diplomatic History. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3386 The Military and War in America.

        This course is an intensive study of the American military experience from the Colonial period to the present. The course focuses on the military, political and diplomatic history of the great conflicts of the United States. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3387 World War II.

        A comprehensive study of the inter-war and World War II era from 1919 - 1945, emphasizing the events leading to the war in Europe, the rise of Nazi Germany, the major battles and campaigns in the European theatre, and the aftermath of the war. The course also examines the rise of the Japanese Empire, the events leading to the outbreak of war in Asia and the Pacific, and the major battles and campaigns of the Pacific war through the defeat of Japan. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3388 Public History.

        This course will explore topics in the field of Public History, including architectural preservation and restoration, museum studies and oral history. The topics will vary from semester to semester, but each semester students will receive instruction on the techniques of analyzing oral sources, primary textual materials and historical artifacts of various types, including architectural dwellings, tools, and local and family records. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3389 Africa: Past and Present.

        An examination of the problems, potentials, and upheavals of Modern Africa. Emphasis is on such topics as the impact of the slave trade on African society, racial conflicts, apartheid, the emergence of African nationalism, the end of white colonial rule, and the difficulties of achieving economic and political stability in contemporary Africa. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3390 Conceptualizing History Education.

        This capstone course will examine conceptualization techniques in Texas, U.S., and World History. The course is designed to enable History students to organize a vast amount of material into a logical framework that will help them to better understand the interactions of individuals, communities, nations, and cultures across time and place. Special emphasis will be placed on subject areas included in the Texas Examination for Educator Standards. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3391 Colonial Latin America.

        This course is designed to trace the conquest and development of the colonial institutions of Spain and Portugal in the Americas, including the Spanish borderlands as the center of Spanish colonial activity and power in the Americas. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3392 American Indian History.

        This course examines the history of Native Americans in the United States. Although the emphasis is historical, the course does include ethnographic material. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3393 African-American History.

        A comprehensive course in the African American experience which explores the various forces shaping race relations in the United States. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3394 America in the 1960s.

        This course will explore the decade of the 1960s in the United States, paying particular attention to the social, cultural, and political shifts that occurred during these years. Students will develop a nuanced understanding of this pivotal decade in American history and will be able to engage in contemporary debates about its multiple meanings. Prerequisite: None. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3395 American Environmental History.

        This course focuses on how nature has affected the course of American history, particularly in regards to the role of natural resources, the growth of the economy, responses to environmental crises and challenges, and transformations in the environment resulting from centuries of use.  Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.  Credit 3.

      • HIST 3397 Modern Mexico.

        This course examines the national history of Mexico from the era of independence (c.1810) to the present. It explores the challenges that the Mexican people faced after gaining independence, their resilience during years of political and economic change, and the rich culture that has emerged in the wake of those struggles. Attention is also given to the US-Mexican border as a site of complex cultural interaction.  Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.  Credit 3.

      • HIST 3398 Texas and the Southwest.

        As a study of the Greater Southwest, This course examines Spanish expansion and the Spanish-French rivalry in the lower Mississippi region and Texas. Special emphasis is given to geographic factors and cultural developments. Credit 3.

      • HIST 3399 Special Topics in History.

        This course examines various specialized topics in history not normally covered in detail by other upper-level courses. Credit 3.

      • HIST 4333 History of the Black Civil Rights Movement.

        This course examines the black civil rights struggle in the United States from the late 19th century to the present. Topics examined include the black response to Jim Crow laws, the emergence of national civil rights organizations as well as local activism, and historical events that have served as catalysts for change in civil rights legislation. Credit 3.

      • HIST 4363 History of American Slavery. Credit 3.

      • HIST 4367 The American South.

        This course examines the dynamics and expansive nature of the American South. Key topics include: examining the peoples and varied regions of the South, its economic and political development, literature, race and religion. Credit 3. (pending approval). Credit 3.

      • HIST 4368 The Era of the American Revolution, 1763-1789.

        An intensive study of the issues of conflict between English continental colonies and British imperial policy which led to the movement for independence. Consideration is also given to internal colonial conflicts and attempts to solve the federal problem culminating in the formation of the Constitution. Credit 3.

      • HIST 4370 The History of the West.

        A study of the settlement and development of the Trans-Mississippi West and its influence upon national and international affairs. Credit 3.

      • HIST 4375 Readings in History.

        A course designed especially for advanced students in history with schedule problems who are capable of independent study. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of history, approval of the department chair, the instructor directing the study and a 3.4 overall GPA. This course may be taken for Academic Distinction credit. See Academic Distinction Program in this catalog. Credit 3.

      • HIST 4378 Modern China and Japan.

        This course will focus on the history of modern China and Japan from the last Chinese dynasties to the present, with emphasis on the resilience and weaknesses of China’s imperial system; the challenges posed to China’s traditions by Western economic and cultural penetration; China’s twentieth century experiments in forms of government and in direction of its cultural development; and the political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Japan from the beginning of the Meiji period (1868) to the present. Credit 3.

      • HIST 4380 Modern France: From the Revolution to the Present.

        This course examines the history of France from 1789 – the present. The military, political, and diplomatic history of France in this era are the main focus of the course. Credit 3.

      • HIST 4383 Topics in the History of Gender and Sexuality.

        The topic will vary by semester, each offering of the course likely emphasizing how the understanding of gender and sexuality differs historically according to factors such as race, class, ethnicity, religion and/or sexual orientation. Prerequisite: HIST 3383. Credit 3.

      • HIST 4395 Contemporary Latin America.

        The development of the South American Republics from their independence to the present. Social, economic, and political development will be closely examined. Credit 3.

      • HIST 4399 History Senior Seminar


Honors Course Descriptions

      • HONR 1331 Honors Seminar I.

        This interdisciplinary seminar examines science from a generalist perspective to give students a basic understanding of science in the contemporary world. It is intended for students from any major and does not privilege certain majors over others. The course includes faculty from various science departments, as well as qualified faculty from departments outside the sciences. Topics vary. Credit 3.

      • HONR 1361 Integrated Science I: Physics, Geology and Geography.

        This course provides non-science major honor students with a multi-disciplinary science experience that meets the baccalaureate lab-science requirements. The course introduces students to basic concepts in the fields of physics, geology and geography. Note: must be taken concurrently with GEOL 1103. Credit 3.

      • HONR 1362 Integrated Science II: Chemistry and Biology.

        This course provides non-science major honor students with a multi-disciplinary science experience that meets the baccalaureate lab-science requirements. The course introduces students to basic concepts in the fields of chemistry and biology. Note: must be taken concurrently with CHEM 1100. Credit 3.

      • HONR 2331 Honors Seminar II.

        This course introduces students to the fundamentals of decision making and problem solving. Students will (1) learn fundamental principles, generalizations, or theories of decision making, (2) learn how to apply course material to improve thinking, problem solving, and decisions, (3) gain skills for working as a team in presenting a problem for decisions, (4) understand how to analyze and critically evaluate ideas, arguments, and points of view concerned with decisions. Credit 3.

      • HONR 2375 Honors Seminar in the Fine Arts.

        This team-taught class is an investigation into the theories, meanings, purposes, and practical experiences of the fine arts, including dance, music, the visual arts, and theater. Students will attend dance and music concerts, theater productions, and art exhibits. Spring semester only. Credit 3.

      • HONR 3331 Honors Seminar III.

        This course deals with contemporary social, economic, political, and international issues and provides important background information and perspectives on current debates and events. Course content varies. Credit 3.

      • HONR 3332 Honors Seminar in the Humanities.

        This course is a team-taught, cross-disciplinary concentration on ideas, developments, and subject matter in the humanities. Credit 3.

      • HONR 3337 Honors Dialogues Seminar.

        The Dialogues Seminar is a team taught, interdisciplinary course that examines selected controversial or provocative topics from various academic and intellectual perspectives. Faculty from multiple disciplines engage with one another and with the students in interactive discussions of the selected topic for the course. Credit: 3.

      • HONR 4375 Special Topics in Honors.

        This course affords honors students the opportunity to do an honors thesis, a long-term research and writing project under the direct supervision of a faculty member. The course is open to honors students in all disciplines. Credit 3.


Industrial Education Course Descriptions

      • INED 4300 History and Objectives of CTE.

        A study of the history and philosophy of Vocational Industrial Education. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

      • INED 4310 Occup Human Relations in CTE.

        This course is designed to prepare the student to develop interpersonal skills and a better understanding of working relationships with people. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

      • INED 4363 Preparation of Instructional Materials.

        This course is designed to prepare a student in the selection, development, organization, and effective use of instructional materials in Industrial Education classes. It involves the study of types, values, limitations and sources of instruction sheets and other teaching aids. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

      • INED 4364 Teaching in Schools & Industry.

        A study of the objectives and the selection, organization and presentation of the subject matter of the various areas of Industrial Education including the organization of units of work, and demonstration teaching. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

      • INED 4379 Occupational Analysis and Curriculum Development.

        This course is designed to enable a student to analyze trades, occupational pursuits and jobs for divisions, operations and information in order to develop a curriculum compatible to his/her teaching field. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

      • INED 4382 Work-Based Learning.

        This course is to prepare the Work-Based Learning teacher to implement and teach a Work-Based Learning co-operative education class. The content will cover methods of student selection, work station qualifications, training plans, state and federal laws, and integration of the school and industrial work experience. Credit 3.

      • INED 4391 Laboratory Management, Organization and Control.

        This course is designed to prepare students to successfully manage laboratory activities, organize their labs in accordance with contemporary concepts, and to control materials/supplies within their laboratories. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.


Industrial Technology Course Descriptions

      • ITEC 1100 Introduction to Professional Leadership Skills.

        This course focuses on leadership and study skills necessary for succeeding in the many career options available to professionals in industrial education, business and industry. This course is intended for beginning students. Credit 1.

      • ITEC 1340 Electronics Technology I.

        This course is designed to provide fundamental understanding of electronics in DC circuits. Emphasis is on knowledge and application of electrical safety, power generation, metering instruments and circuit analysis. Laboratory experiences include “hands-on” circuit construction and basic troubleshooting. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 1361 Engineering Graphics.

        This is a recognized standard course in beginning drawing for engineering and industrial education. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 1363 Construction Technology I.

        This course is a study of materials and methods of wood frame construction found in residential and commercial construction focusing on aspects of load-bearing structural design elements. Instruction is given in the correct use of hand tools and machine tools, job safety, job-site controls, material handling, equipment, and application. Laboratory experiences include design and construction of a wood frame structure with elements typically found in residential construction. (2-2). Credit 3.

      • ITEC 1366 Machining Technology I.

        This course serves as an introduction to the problems, techniques, and processes of modern machining technology. Instruction is given in the use of hand and machine tools, introduction to computer numerical control, product planning and development, metric measurement, safety, and opportunities for employment in the machining industry. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 1371 Descriptive Geometry.

        This course emphasizes problems of space relations of points, lines, surfaces, intersections, and developed surfaces, and their application to the graphical solution of engineering problems. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 1390 Introduction to Computer-Aided Drafting.

        This course is intended to provide the student with an understanding of Computer-Aided Drafting principles. Students will utilize the software command structure of two popular CAD programs, namely AutoCAD and MicroStation, to complete a number of typical and practical drafting application exercises. Approximately one-half of the semester will be spent on each program. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 2320 Electronics Technology II.

        This course is an in-depth study of the electronic principles associated with AC circuits. Topics of study include network theorems, circuit analysis methods, resonance, filters and frequency responses of reactive circuits. Prerequisite: ITEC 1340 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 2350 Solid State Electronics.

        This course is designed to provide in-depth knowledge and experience in the principles and applications of solid-state devices. Specific emphasis is placed on the construction, characteristics and applications of diodes, rectifiers, transistors, thyristors and integrated circuits. Laboratory experience is gained through circuit construction, testing and troubleshooting. Prerequisite: ITEC 2320 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 2363 Home Planning.

        This course consists of the development of a set of plans and specifications for a small residence. Prerequisite: ITEC 1390 or ITEC 1361. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 2367 Elements of Metal Technology.

        This course is a study of materials and methods of construction found in metal building systems. Instruction is given in the correct use of hand and power tools, job safety, job-site controls, material handling, equipment and application. Aspects of load design calculations, fastener use, metal coatings, and erection equipment are studied. Laboratory instruction includes basic metal working processes (welding, sheet-metal, foundry, and wrought-iron work) used in metal frame construction. (2-2). Credit 3.

      • ITEC 3300 Contemporary Technology Innovations, Issues and Perspectives.

        This course provides a study of societal technologies and their effects on the daily lives of consumers. The course presents the pervasive nature of technology innovations and increases the awareness of the promises of uncertainty associated with the use of technology as a human enterprise. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 3310 Product Design and Development.

        This course explores the processes by which products are brought to the market place. Processes are examined with special emphasis placed on manufacturing, prototyping, patent and trademark procedures, industrial design, problem-solving, and decision-making. In addition, creating and working in cross-functional teams to produce products for consumer use is addressed. Prerequisites: ITEC 1390 or ITEC 1361. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 3360-361 Related Science, Mathematics, and Technology in Occupations.

        This is the written portion of an 18-hour segment of proficiency examinations. Prerequisite: Consent of department chair. Credit 6.

      • ITEC 3362-363 Manipulative Skills in Occupations.

        This segment is for the manipulative portion of the proficiency examination. Prerequisite: Consent of department chair. Credit 6.

      • ITEC 3364-365 Knowledge of Related Subjects in Occupations and Personal Qualifications.

        This is the oral portion of the proficiency examination. Prerequisite: Consent of department chair. Credit 6.

      • ITEC 3368 Construction Processes.

        This course is a study of materials and methods of construction found in concrete and masonry structures. Concrete chemistry, mixing and placement equipment, testing, finishing techniques, reinforcing, formwork, specification, and job-site safety implementing these materials are studied. Laboratory experiences include batch sampling and testing and small group projects implementing concrete and masonry methods and materials. Prerequisite: ITEC 1390 or ITEC 1361. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 3370 Construction Technology II.

        This course focuses on non-structural construction typically found in cabinetry, trim, and furniture construction. Included is the study of woods, synthetic materials, hardware, and wood joinery. Instruction is given in the correct use of hand and machine tools, job safety, job-site controls, and material specification. Lab experiences include designing, planning, construction, and finishing of a piece of cabinetwork or furniture. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 3371 Civil Drafting.

        This course will consist of drafting techniques and requirements necessary for civil engineering offices. Topics include survey drafting, map drafting, topos, site plans, sub-division plats, profile drawings, and other related topics. Prerequisite: ITEC 1371. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 3372 Construction Drafting.

        This course is a study of drafting techniques and requirements for the commercial and heavy construction industries and will add to the skill set of construction management students. Topics will include foundation design, commercial building design, structural detail, and premanufactured metal constructed building design. Demonstrations, student inquiry, in-class problem solving, and three dimensional (3D) modeling will be utilized. Prerequisite: ITEC 1390 and ITEC 1363. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 3373 Industrial Electronics.

        The principles and operation of electrical switching, timing, and control devices are studied with emphasis on industrial solid state and digital controls. Topics of coverage include servomechanisms, transducers, motor control systems, and closed-loop industrial systems. Prerequisite: ITEC 2320 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 3374 Time and Motion Study.

        A study of the principles of motion economy, work measurement, and improvement of production methods as they apply to modern industry. Attention is given to human relations, work simplification, and selected charting procedures. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 3375 Statics.

        Statics is a branch of Engineering Mechanics, and the course examines qualitative and quantitative treatments of forces and moments. Designing trusses, constructing free body diagrams, and performing equilibrium analysis for coplanar systems are included. Prerequisites: PHYS 1301/1101, and MATH 1316 or MATH 1430 or MATH 2399. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 3379 Industrial Systems Drafting.

        This course includes the illustration and preparation of drawings and the related symbolism used in electrical and fluid fields. Related and required piping and fitting fundamentals are also covered. Prerequisite: ITEC 1390 or ITEC 1361. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 3382 Issues in Nanotechnology Safety.

        This course introduces students to the emerging technological frontier of nanotechnology. Areas of study will include: potential health concerns, potential safety hazards, exposed control procedures, occupational health surveillance, and research in the area of safety management for future nanotechnology workers. Prerequisites: ITEC 1340 and ITEC 1361. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 4330 Construction Management and Procedures.

        This course is designed to provide a general knowledge of construction applications and procedures. Emphasis is on site preparation, foundations, and concrete. Emphasis will be placed on the responsibility of general or prime contractors and specialty contractors. Students will be taught cost estimation and procedures for bidding. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 4339 Computer-Aided Drafting Productivity.

        This is a computer applications course for design and drafting and introduces students to the techniques used to produce technical models/drawings. Students will learn drafting practices and how to apply them using computer-aided software. Prior knowledge of drafting software and/or prior experience of working with computers is advantageous, but not required/expected. Students will produce technical drawings using various computer design and drafting practices. Concepts of 2D drawings will be covered along with an introduction to three dimensional parametric modeling. The intent is to develop fundamental knowledge and skills that are conceptually applicable to any computer-aided design (CAD) system. Prerequisites: ITEC 1390 and ITEC 1361. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 4340 Alternative Energy Technology

        This course is a comprehensive examination of ambient renewable energy sources and their applications. It will acquaint students with existing and potential ambient alternative energy sources, production capacities, energy harvesting, conversion, and storage techniques. A primary focus will be placed on the technical elements of alternative energy, including the production of various energy harvesting systems such as wind turbines and hydrogen fuel cells. Using historical, traditional energy generation methods and reviewing typical energy consumption patterns, the course will examine fundamental concepts, terminology, definitions, and nomenclature common to all energy systems. Pre-requisite: ITEC 1340 and junior standing. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 4363 Safety Program Management.

        This course presents an in-depth examination of the concepts, methods, and techniques involved in safety program management. Emphasis will be placed on the development of safety management programs for the industrial and construction industries. The strengths and weaknesses of existing safety programs, performance management techniques, behavior-based safety, design safety, legal aspects of safety and health management, and emerging trends in safety and health management will be covered. Prerequisites: ITEC 1340 and ITEC 1361. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 4367 Engineering Materials Technology.

        This course consists of the principles and techniques involved in designing and drawing machine parts and other items normally required in an industrial setting. Topics include sectioning, dimensioning, view rotation, symbols, legends, developments, and blueprint details. Prerequisites: ITEC 1390 or ITEC 1361 and ITEC 2363. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 4368 Cost Estimating of Construction Materials.

        This course is devoted to the study of qualities, types, and sizes of materials such as lumber and other wood products, masonry, paint, hardware, ceramic, and metal products. In addition, cost estimates for materials and labor are studied by figuring the cost estimate of a small residence. Extensive use is made of actual samples and other visual aids. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 4369 Special Topics in Industrial Technology.

        Individual study in specialized areas of Industrial Technology. To be directed and approved by the Industrial Technology advisor. This course is designed to be a multi-topic course. The student can take the course under various special topics being offered. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 4370 Construction Plans and Documents.

        This course is designed to give a clear insight into the particular problems of construction and proper construction procedures. The site selection, availability of services, grading, subsurface explorations to determine foundation needs, construction organization, and other activities of construction are presented in logical units. Prerequisites: ITEC 2363. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 4373 Digital Electronics.

        This course is a study of the principles and applications of digital logic circuits including logic gates, counters, shift registers, and combinational logic circuits. Laboratory experiences consist of experimental problems. Prerequisite: ITEC 2350. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 4380 Material Handing and Plant Layout.

        This course is the study of the basic requirements needed to develop the most efficient layouts of equipment and of operating and servicing facilities whether in manufacturing plants, warehouses, or other industrial or business applications. Special emphasis is on the necessary coordination between plant layout, materials handling, work simplification and production planning, and operation control. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 4382 Industrial Safety.

        This course is a study of the problems involved in developing an integrated safety program for an industrial or commercial establishment. It involves safety education, safe worker practices, recognition and elimination of health hazards, machinery guards, in-plant traffic, material handling, and emergency treatment for industrial accidents. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 4384 Supervisory Personnel Practices.

        This course introduces students to the principles of management pertaining to personnel. Responsibilities of management, industrial economics, supervisory information, training, group dynamics, work simplification, labor and human relations, working conditions, morale, motivation, and mental health are covered. Writing enhanced. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 4388 3D Parametric Design.

        This is a computer applications course for parametric design and drafting, in which the computer is used to produce parametric technical models/drawings. Students will learn drafting practices and how to apply them using computer aided software. Students will further be able to produce technical drawings using 3D CAD packages. Concepts of creating 2D drawings will be covered along with introduction to 3D parametric modeling. The course will enable the student to use Autodesk Inventor in advanced parametric design/drafting and other courses. Prerequisite: IT 161. Credit 3.

      • ITEC 4390 Directed Studies.

        Designed to provide students with the opportunity to gain specialized experience in one or more of the following areas: internship, laboratory procedures, individualized study, innovative curricula, workshops, specialized training schools, and seminars. Internship is required of all teacher education majors. Writing enhanced. May be repeated or taken concurrently to a maximum of 9 hours. Credit 1-9.

      • ITEC 4391 Work-Based Mentorship.

        Students work in their specialization in the industry. Students may complete their internship in one or two semesters. Students must work 100 clock hours for 1 college credit. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Credit 6.


Kinesiology Course Descriptions

      • KINE 1110 Racquet Sports.

        Instruction is provided in skills, knowledge, and strategies in one or more of the racquet-related activities listed in the class schedule. Credit 1.

      • KINE 1111 Elementary Activities.

        This course provides an overview of the program of activities in elementary school physical education with emphasis on the understanding of movement, common problems and possible solutions. Credit 1.

      • KINE 1113 Basketball/Soccer.

        This course will offer skills, knowledge, and techniques presented at either the beginning or intermediate level in each of these activities. Enrollment limited to Kinesiology majors and minors. Credit 1.

      • KINE 1114 Rhythmic Activities and Innovative Games.

        The rhythmic portion of the course will include experiences in basic musical signature and pattern identification. These will be applied to selected regional and square dances, jumping rope, and aerobic dance routines. During the innovative games half principles upon which novel activities are based will be presented along with games which depict each tenet. Enrollment limited to Kinesiology majors and minors. Credit 1.

      • KINE 1115 Track and Field/Gymnastics.

        The student will gain proficiency in fundamental skills in gymnastics and track and field events, as well as an understanding of basic terminology associated with judging and spotting. Enrollment limited to Kinesiology majors and minors. Credit 1.

      • KINE 1116 Varsity Sports.

        This course is based upon the National Collegiate Athletic Association CHAMPS/Life Skills Program and is designed to assist the student-athlete in developing skills in the areas of academics, personal growth, career choice, and commitment to service. Enrollment is limited to members of athletic teams. Substitution of this class for the University’s activity requirement is not permitted. No more than four hours of KIN 116 KINE 1116 can be counted toward the degree. Approval for enrollment must be obtained from the student’s coach prior to registration. Credit 1.

      • KINE 1117 Lifetime and Individual Sports.

        Each class will have skills, knowledge and techniques presented at either the beginning or intermediate level in one or more of the lifetime and individual sports. Credit 1.

      • KINE 1331 Foundations of Kinesiology.

        This course serves as a base for all kinesiology courses. Units will include historical development, philosophical implications, physical fitness, scientific bases of movement, and educational values of kinesiology and career path options. Credit 3.

      • KINE 2110 Aquatics (Swimming, Standard Red Cross Life Saving, and Scuba Diving).

        This course will be offered for all levels of swimming (beginning through advanced), diving, synchronized swimming, or scuba diving. For advanced life saving and water safety instructors see KIN 232. Credit 1.

      • KINE 2111 Golf and Recreational Activities.

        This course presents rules, knowledge and skills in golf, archery and another leisure time activity selected on a rotational basis. Half a semester is devoted to golf, with equal time allotted to archery and the other named activity. Enrollment limited to Kinesiology majors and minors. Credit 1.

      • KINE 2112 Archery.

        This course will include skills, knowledge and techniques of archery at the beginning level. Credit 1.

      • KINE 2113 Softball/Volleyball.

        The student will gain skills, knowledge, and techniques of softball and volleyball at the beginning level. Enrollment limited to Kinesiology majors and minors. Credit 1.

      • KINE 2114 Weight Training and Physical Conditioning.

        Experiences in this course will include skills, knowledge and techniques of weight training and physical conditioning at the beginning level. Credit 1.

      • KINE 2115 Lifetime Health and Wellness.

        Students will gain an understanding of physical conditioning and wellness pertaining to the five components of health-related fitness. Students will develop an understanding of lifestyle related diseases and behavior modification techniques. In addition, there will be opportunities to participate in a variety of movement experiences related to fitness. Credit 1.

      • KINE 2119 Kinesiology Activities.

        Activities can include special or unique areas as instructors are available. This will include those activities which are not offered on a regular basis including aerobic dance, aquatic exercise, etc. Credit 1.

      • KINE 2330 First Aid: Red Cross and Instructor’s Course.

        A course for those who wish to acquire a knowledge of Red Cross emergency and preventive measures. Successful completion leads to CPR and first aid certification. Students may become instructors through additional American Red Cross training. (Also listed as HLTH 2330.) Credit 3.

      • KIN 233 Honors Fitness for Living.

        This course will substitute for HON 215 for students in the Honors Program. Specific topics include flexibility, muscular strength, muscular endurance, nutrition, weight control and theories of obesity, ergogenic aids, date rape, sexually transmitted diseases, Title IX, sexual harassment, message, care and prevention of athletic injuries and aging. Other content will be presented as time permits. Students will be required to complete a formal research project which will involve data collection and analysis. Credit 3.

      • KINE 2363 Motor Development.

        This course investigates theories of motor learning and motor development of children, K-6. Special emphasis is placed upon sequential motor development patterns, the needs, interests, and abilities of the child in relation to physical, social, mental and emotional domains. Opportunities are provided to work with elementary school children in guiding their perceptual-motor learning and development. Credit 3.

      • KINE 2365 Coaching of Track And Baseball or Softball.

        This course includes a study of the skills and techniques used in coaching baseball/softball and track and field in the schools. The skills and techniques are demonstrated and performed on the baseball/softball field and track. Credit 3.

      • KINE 2366 Coaching of Football.

        The latest techniques of offensive and defensive football are stressed with emphasis on the problems that will confront high school coaches. Some techniques are demonstrated and performed on the football field. Credit 3.

      • KINE 2367 Coaching of Basketball.

        A study is made of the fundamental preparation, operation, expertise and management necessary to coach and conduct a basketball program. Credit 3.

      • KINE 2368 Coaching of Volleyball.

        A study is made of the individual fundamentals, strategy, scouting, practice preparation and administrative duties associated with coaching a volleyball program. Credit 3.

      • KINE 2388 Officiating Sports.

        This course includes a study of the rules, interpretations, and the mechanics of officiating. The course is designed to develop the skills and knowledge required in the officiating of football, basketball, baseball, soccer, track and field, and other interscholastic sports. Credit 3.

      • KINE 3117 Compentency in Motor Skills.

        This basic skills course is designed to equip prospective physical education teachers with the motor skill competencies neccessary to teach physical education in EC-12 schools.  Prospective physical education teachers will be assessed on skills in tennis, volleyball, soccer, and other sports.  Prerequisite: None.  Credit1.

      • KINE 3362 Biomechanics.

        A study of human motion in two broad areas: the neurological and mechanical aspects of human movement, as well as muscle structure and functions. Application of these two areas to motor skills analysis is emphasized. Prerequisite: BIOL 2401 or BIOL 3410. Credit 3.

      • KINE 3363 Assessment in Kinesiology.

        This course presents information on the construction and administration of tests evaluating fitness and motor skills used in sports. Issues in grading and evaluation are also addressed. Previously KIN 321. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit. 3.

      • KINE 3364 Motor Learning.

        This class explores the processes involved in the acquisition of motor actions. Emphasis is placed on how teachers can apply theoretical concepts to more effectively structure their classes. Previously KIN 322. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • KINE 3368 Motor Programming.

        This course includes a study of motor programming with special focus on the child, his/her needs and abilities, and the administration, organization, evaluation, and implementation of sequential motor programs which enhance motor development. Credit 3.

      • KINE 3369 Therapeutic Modalities of Athletic Training.

        A study of the theories and principles involved in the use of therapeutic modalities in treating injuries to the physically active, providing students with the necessary skills and theoretical knowledge to formulate treatment plans for injuries. Prerequisites: KINE 3370. Credit 3.

      • KINE 3370 Prevention and Care of Injuries.

        This course includes instruction and laboratory work in the care and prevention of injuries. It is designed to meet the needs of the athletic coach and physical education teacher. Prerequisite: Junior standing in Kinesiology or permission of the instructor, and BIOL 2401 or BIOL 3410. Credit 3.

      • KINE 3372 Team and Individual/Dual Sport Skill Analysis.

        This course will introduce the instructional process of analyzing and sequencing skill components and performance techniques found within team and individual/dual sports. The course is designed to allow the student to engage in individual and cooperative teaching experiences that utilize multiple instructional strategies. The student will investigate the process of a task analysis and other skill sequencing experiences. Aspects of lesson progression and construction will be incorporated throughout the course while maintaining a focus on motor skill acquisition. Prerequisites: KINE 3364 and three from KINE 1110 (tennis/badminton), KINE 1113, KINE 1115, KINE 2111, KINE 2113 and KINE 2114. Credit 3.

      • KINE 3373 Physiology of Exercise.

        This course is designed to develop an understanding of the manner in which the body reacts to the exacting requirements of activity and exercise. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • KINE 3375 Teaching Secondary Physical Education.

        This course examines the designing of physical education programs, teaching of physical education programs, analysis of student performance in a physical education program, and implementation of a physical education program at the secondary level. Opportunities are provided to work with physical education students in the secondary setting. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • KINE 3378 Administration of Kinesiology and Recreation.

        The purpose of this course will be to examine management theory and practice related to the sport industry. In addition, a variety of specializations associated with the field of sport management will be examined to help the student garner a better understanding of available career opportunities in this sector of business. The application of concepts to scholastic programs will also be discussed. Prerequisite: 18 hours in Kinesiology. Credit 3.

      • KINE 3388 Sports in Contemporary Society.

        A study is made of sport and its impact upon society. Credit 3.

      • KINE 4117 Practicum in Kinesiology.

        A course in which students serve as interns in a laboratory situation where emphasis is placed upon teaching skills. This provides a qualified student with an opportunity to gain teaching experience. Prerequisite: Permission of department chair. Credit 1.

      • KINE 4330 History and Philosophy of American Physical Education and Sport.

        This course provides a historical and philosophical survey of the events which have influenced the exercise and sporting practices of contemporary American society. The focus is on the development of physical education, exercise, sport, dance, and the Olympic movement with interpretations and analyses of these events. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Credit 3.

      • KINE 4335 Psychology of Coaching.

        This course deals with understanding of the psychological make-up of the athlete. It explores traditional myths, syndromes and stumbling blocks facing the modern day athlete and how these may be overcome. The course will focus on the dynamics of the coach/athlete relationship. Credit 3.

      • KINE 4363 Laboratory Experiences in the Motor Domain.

        This course is concerned with a study of fine and gross-motor activities and developmental progressions of pre-school children. Opportunities are given for field-based experiences in teaching children motor skills. Prerequisite: KINE 3368. Credit 3.

      • KINE 4369 Adaptive Kinesiology.

        A study of the special needs of handicapped individuals with emphasis on the adaptations of activities for them in a program of kinesiology. Credit 3.

      • KINE 4373 Advanced Topics in Physiology of Exercise.

        This course bridges the gap between basic undergraduate and graduate physiology of exercise. Selected topics will include: perceived exertion, biorhythms, mood elevation and exercise, interval training, periodization, LBW gain, somatotyping, effects of high altitude, blood doping, ergogenic aids, vegetarian diets, pregnancy and exercise, theories of obesity and endocrine functioning. Other topics will be presented as time permits. Prerequisite: KINE 3373. Credit 3.

      • KINE 4377 Principles of Exercise Testing and Prescription.

        This course is designed to provide the student with the theoretical background and practical experience necessary for the safe and scientific evaluation of physical fitness, particularly as it relates to health and disease and the development of programs for remediation, maintenance and enhancement of motor and health-related qualities. Prerequisite: KINE 3373. Credit 3.

      • KINE 4392 Problems in Kinesiology.

        A directed individual study of an approved problem related to the field of kinesiology. Prerequisites: 9 advanced hours in Kinesiology and permission of the department chair. Credit 3.

      • KINE 4393 Principles and Practices of Adult Fitness Management.

        This course is designed to provide the student with the theoretical background and practical experience necessary for a successful internship experience. Prerequisite: Senior standing. Credit 3.

      • KINE 4394 Internship.

        This course provides the study with opportunities to demonstrate competencies developed in previous courses by working in an agency under the supervision of a qualified practitioner. Prerequisites: Senior standing and KINE 4393 or HLTH 4393. Credit 3.


Library Science Course Descriptions

      • LSSL 2363 Literature for Children and Teens.

        Designed to acquaint students with the selection, critical analysis, and historical development of literature for children and young adults. Emphasis will be placed on selecting materials which meet the needs and interest of children and young adults, identifying techniques and strategies which will motivate ALL children and young adults to read and respond to literature, and developing critical abilities for evaluating literature and related materials for children and young adults. A strong multicultural element will also be a part of this course. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3. Prerequisite: Must have junior standing or above.

      • LSSL 3361 Literature And Related Materials For Children.

        The historical development, critical analysis, and selection of materials for children. Identification and use of folklore, poetry, imaginative, realistic and informational literature. Stresses developmental needs of children including those of various ethnic groups. Emphasis on motivational techniques. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3. Prerequisite: Must have junior standing or above.

      • LSSL 3362 Literature And Related Materials For Young Adults.

        Selection of literature approved selection tools, the preparation of bibliographies, oral and written reports, book talks, critical evaluations annotations, and the sharing of reading experiences. Stresses developmental needs of young adults. Emphasis on motivational techniques. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3. Prerequisite: Must have junior standing or above.

      • LSSL 4110 Library Science Workshop.

        This course deals with current topics in school libraries. One semester hour is earned and the course may be repeated for a maximum of three hours. NOTE: Maximum of three hours workshop coursework allowed in a student’s program. Credit 1.


Mass Communication Course Descriptions

      • MCOM 1330 Mass Communication and Society.

        This course will survey the history and theory of mass media in American society with an emphasis on issues in broadcast television, cable television, and print journalism. Topics addressed include the impact of the printing press; evolution of print media, telegraph, film camera, and wireless technologies; structure of contemporary media industries; influence of advertisers, regulatory agencies, and ratings services; production, distribution, and syndication systems; social influence and personal use of mass media content. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 1332 Writing for Mass Media.

        Designed to introduce writing for media across a wide spectrum of disciplines, this course will provide hands-on practice in basic writing skills for news, broadcast, the web, and public relations. Emphasis is placed on the enhancement of language and grammar skills. Prerequisite: ‘C’ in ENGL 1301 or equivalent. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 1371 Audio Production and Performance.

        This course surveys the mechanics of audio production and the operation of studio equipment. Students study and practice the use of microphone techniques, music, sound effects, and performance. They are introduced to digital audio production and appropriate audio software. Lecture and laboratory projects acquaint students with audio production requirements and responsibilities. Students receive practical hands-on experience with attention to mixing, recording, and editing. Students are expected to produce original content for broadcast on KSHU-FM. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 2362 News Reporting.

        This course covers theory and practice in writing specialized stories for mass media outlets, including news assignments in public safety, legal issues, government, education, health care, and politics. Emphasis is placed on covering current events. Prerequisite: MCOM 3330. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 2371 Introduction to Visual Communication.

        This course introduces students to the basics of visual image production, focusing on graphic design, creative visualization, video editing, lighting, on-camera performance, and studio producing/directing. Students are expected to produce original content for broadcast on Cable Channel 7. Prerequisite: MCOM 1371. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 2382 Desktop Publishing.

        This course introduces students to the principles of design applicable to publications created using desktop publishing software and computer technology. Special attention is given to design principles, typography, layout, and production techniques. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 3330 Information Analysis.

        This class summarizes and offers practical strategies for gathering, interpreting, and presenting data related to the practice of journalism and media research. Students will be introduced to information-gathering methods, including direct interviewing, questioning techniques, electronic document retrieval and manipulation, database management, and Internet skills. Prerequisite: MCOM 1332. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 3226 Media Practicum.

        Advanced instruction in practice and projects. Students perform assigned work with co-curricular activities (KSHU-FM, Cable Channel 7, The Houstonian, student news, and Priority One PR) in a laboratory environment. Prerequisite for Houstonian: MCOM 2362. Credit 1 or 2.

      • MCOM 3332 Analysis of Electronic Media.

        This course examines the central role of the electronic media in American society with an emphasis on critical-cultural analysis of industry processes and various forms of media content. Students learn to write critical analyses of issues related to the print, film, and digital media. The emphasis in this course is primarily on television’s industrial practices, narrative strategies, and social influence. Prerequisites: MCOM 1330 and Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 3360 Specialized Writing.

        This course will cover study and practice in writing for mass media in specialized areas. Emphasis is on developing a level of writing suitable for publication. Course may be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisites: MCOM 1332, 6 hours of ENGL. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 3362 Mass Media Messages and Effects.

        This course explores mass communication theory, focusing on social-behavioral and critical-cultural approaches. It emphasizes how the same issues (e.g. media violence) recur over time and how ideas about media have changed as new media technologies have emerged. Prerequisites: MCOM 1330 and Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 3364 News Editing.

        This course focuses on the editor’s functions in handling news copy from writing to the printed page or script with emphasis on writing quality and new technologies of production. Content includes copy editing and headline writing, computers as tools of the trade, picture cropping, caption writing, working with wire service copy, typography, and graphics. Prerequisite: MCOM 2362. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 3371 Advanced Audio Production.

        This course presents advanced concepts in audio and radio recording and editing. Students are expected to produce original content for broadcast on KSHU-FM. Prerequisite: MCOM 1371 Credit 3.

      • MCOM 3372 Single Camera and Non-linear Editing.

        This course teaches pre-production, field production, and post-production techniques. Elements include field camera setup and operation, remote lighting, remote sound, and basic continuity editing with an emphasis on underlying principles of video technology. Students are expected to produce original content for broadcast on Cable Channel 7. Prerequisite: MCOM 1371, MCOM 2371. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 3373 TV Studio Production.

        This course covers fundamentals of video production in a studio environment, including pre-production, in-studio production, and in-studio direction. Students will become familiar with the functions and responsibilities of the production crew, studio environment, and studio equipment. Emphasis is given to multiple camera techniques in studio production. Students are expected to produce original content for broadcast on Cable Channel 7. Prerequisites: MCOM 1371, MCOM 2371, and Junior or Senior standing. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 3374 Broadcast Journalism.

        This class emphasizes the theory, techniques, and practice of television journalism. Emphasis is on writing and editing news copy and honing style and content skills appropriate for effective broadcast news writing. MCOM 3374 also requires production of broadcast news content and involves discussion of current issues facing broadcast journalists. Students are expected to produce original content for broadcast on Cable Channel 7. Prerequisites: MCOM 1332, MCOM 3372. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 3375 Scriptwriting.

        This course emphasizes the study of style, format, principles, and techniques of writing for radio, TV, and feature film. The process of writing fiction and non-fiction will examine the development of the script from research to marketing. Students will learn techniques for writing promotional scripts, public service announcements, documentary scripts, film scripts, and television scripts. Prerequisite: MCOM 1332. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 3378 Media Program Planning & Scripting.

        This course emphasizes the study of legal clearances, budgeting, funding, resource management, and scheduling as these activities relate to radio and television production. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 3379 Multi-Camera Field Production.

        This course emphasizes the techniques and approaches to multi-camera directing and production. MCOM 3379 will train students in various remote production contexts, including sports, dance, music, and special events coverage. Students are expected to produce original content for broadcast on Cable Channel 7. Prerequisites: MCOM 3373. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 3380 Broadcast & Cable Programming.

        This course examines principles of audience analysis, program appeal, and targeted demographics. MCM 380 MCOM 3380 will also assess audience ratings and research, scheduling strategies, advertising influence, and mass media industry practices. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 3.

      • MCOM 3381 Principles of Public Relations.  This course examines principles of public relations, sales promotions, direct marketing, and online communication with emphasis on the way organizations promote their products and images to their publics. The traits of leadership, crisis management, and ethics will be explored. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Credit 3.
      • MCOM 3383 Writing for Public Relations.This course examines the process of communicating to persuade and inform. Students learn the techniques of strategic thinking and practice writing for advertising and promotions, news media, and special audience materials, such as newsletters, brochures, and catalogues. Online communications for internal and external audiences will also be explored. Prerequisite: MCOM 1332. Credit 3.
      • MCOM 3385 Advanced Writing for PR &h; Adv. This course emphasizes the strategic, goal-oriented mission of high-quality media writing. Using a multidisciplinary and multimedia approach, students will learn to write successful and strategically for public relations, advertising, sales, marketing, and business communications formats. Prerequisites: MCOM 3383. Credits 3.
      • MCOM 3386 Media Sales. This course provides the basic tools relevant to the media salesperson in today’s marketplace. Students develop accounts and design sales campaigns specifically for the mass media. Prerequisites: Junior standing. Credit 3.
      • MCOM 3388 Media Marketing and Promotions. This course provides students with an overview of marketing strategies used by mass media companies. MCOM 3388 examines media marketing, market surveys, advertising, content promotion, and public relations as efforts to create and support customer bases and maintain goodwill. Students have the opportunity to create model marketing strategies. Special attention is paid to industry changes and professional ethics. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 3.
      • MCOM 4365 Online Journalism. Students use techniques drawn from various media and forms of writing to produce well-designed, effective communication packages for online distribution. Students integrate written material, video, sound, and graphics into a multimedia online publication. Prerequisite: Junior standing, MCOM 3330 and Junior standing. Credit 3.
      • MCOM 4366 Changing Roles of Mass Media. This course offers assessments of professional and industry trends, regulatory practices, socio-economic developments, and technological innovations that influence the institutions and traditions of the American mass media. Emphasis is placed on the changing roles of media and the impact of new communications technologies. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 3.
      • MCOM 4370 TV News Producing and Reporting. This course offers advanced instruction and practice in student-produced TV newscasts. Students are assigned duties for producing a newscast once a week, as well as gathering, shooting, writing, and editing TV news. Students are expected to produce original content for broadcast on Cable Channel 7. Prerequisite: MCOM 3374, Credit 3.
      • MCOM 4371 Mass Media Law and Ethics.This course will examine legal and ethical concepts as they apply to broadcast and cable television, radio, print media, and Internet-based publishing. It will focus on the evolution of the American legal system with specific attention to state statutes, regulatory agencies, ethical issues, and precedent-setting cases as they relate to free speech, open records, privacy, libel, copyright, and obscenity laws. Prerequisites: MCOM 1330, Junior standing. Credit 3.
      • MCOM 4372 Single Camera and Non-linear Editing II. This course is the continuation of Single Camera and Non-linear Editing I with an emphasis on the aesthetic applications of digital editing and visual story-telling. Students are expected to produce original content for broadcast on Cable Channel 7. Prerequisite: MCOM 3372. Credit 3.
      • MCOM 4373W Advanced Production.This course requires students to assume the primary responsibility, under faculty supervision, of creating and producing programming for Cable Channel 7. This course will also develop portfolio material for graduating students. Prerequisite: MCOM 3372, MCOM 3373. Credit 3.
      • MCOM 4377 Media Management. This course surveys problems and management responsibilities faced by broadcast station managers and/or newspaper and magazine publishers. Topics include required reports (FCC, FTC), financial demands, personnel organization, management theory, public service, and fiduciary responsibilities, and the challenges involved in operating a profitable media outlet. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 3.
      • MCOM 4380 Campaigns and Promotions for Public Relations. This course emphasizes integration of theory, research, and communication techniques for implementing and evaluating public relations campaigns. Focus on creative strategies and media planning, target analysis and buying tactics. Students research, develop, and present an integrated communication plan. Prerequisites: MCOM 3381, MCOM 3383, MCOM 4383. Credit 3.
      • MCOM 4382 Case Studies in Public Relations. This course uses a case study approach to explore managerial goal setting, strategic thinking, budgeting, and working with clients. Successful problem solving, critical thinking, and leadership styles will be examined in depth. Prerequisite: MCM 381 MCOM 3381 or Senior standing. Credit 3.
      • MCOM 4383 Communication Research Methods. This course introduces students to the history and application of research methods, both quantitative and qualitative, that are employed in commercial media markets and academic environments to assess media audiences, media content, and media use. Topics addressed include survey methods, content analysis, experimental research, ethnographic and critical research, research ethics, and statistical analysis. Special attention will be devoted to research in print and electronic media. Prerequisites: MCOM 3330 and Junior standing. Credit 3.
      • MCOM 4391 History and Theory of Communication Technologies. This course examines the history of communication technologies and the theories of technological change, specifically comparing the impact of the printing press, telegraph, film, radio, and television technologies to the impact of the Internet. Emphasis will be on theories of innovation, the integration of new technologies into contemporary society, and hands-on use of the Internet for research, classroom presentations, and group discussions. Prerequisites: MCOM 3330 and Junior standing, Credit 3.
      • MCOM 4393 Global Media Communication. This course studies world media systems in a variety of countries. Emphasis is placed on how history, politics, government, culture, and other social relations influence international media systems, international development projects, and the global flow of information. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Credit 3. Emphasis and Elective Courses
      • MCOM 4398 Professional Internship.   On-the-job application of skills and knowledge learned in the classroom for students who have completed their sophomore year, completed appropriate courses, and achieved an acceptable GPA. Internships may be with print media, electronic media, agencies, institutions, businesses, non-profit groups, or government agencies. Prerequisites: Junior standing, permission of the Internship Coordinator; MCOM majors only. Credit 3.
      • MCOM 4399 Directed Study in Mass Communication. This course provides an opportunity to conduct supervised investigation in an area of special interest. This course is designed specifically for advanced students who are capable of independent research and/or creative activity. Prerequisites: Junior standing, 9 hours advanced MCOM credits; acceptable GPA; permission of department chair. This course may not be used to replace a required course. Credit 3.

Management Course Descriptions

      • MGMT 3310 Principles Of Management.

        This course is concerned with the principles and methods used in managing and operating organizations, both domestically and abroad. Course coverage includes analysis of the organization’s environment and the managerial functions of planning, organizing, leading, motivating, and controlling. Prerequisites: ACCT 2301 and ECON 2301. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 3320 Organizational Behavior.

        Advanced study of individual and group behavior in organizations and how it affects the achievement of organizational objectives. Prerequisite: MGMT 3310. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 3327 Management of Innovation & Technology.

         This course addresses issues concerning the management of innovation and technology such as developing creative potential in individual and organizations and the management of creative employee. Topics will include the importance of innovation and technology to business and society, forecasting for innovation and technology, the value of creation, types of innovation, and the role technology plays in innovation. Prerequisites: MGT 380 MGMT 3310. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 3330 Human Resource Management.

        Personnel policies and administration, job classification and analysis, wage plans and employment procedure, employment interviewing and testing, employee training and evaluation, labor turnover, and legislation affecting labor problems are studied. Prerequisites: MGMT 3310. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 3345 New Product and Technology Commercialization.

         This course addresses the issues of formulation, financing and operations of bringing new products to market. The course will include a group term project designed to teach the students the process of commercializing new products. Topics will include environmental screening, developing and testing the concept of the product, funding, patents and copyrights. Prerequisites: MGMT 3310 Credit 3.

      • MGMT 3350 Services Marketing Management.

        This course examines the characteristics of the service domain. The planning, organization, production, and marketing of quality services will be the focus of the course. Prerequisites: MGMT 3310 and MKTG 3310. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 4310 Small Business Development.

        A comprehensive study of all areas of operations and management of the small business enterprise. Topics covered include: ownership form, site analysis, planning, organizing, staffing, financial control, inventory control, and marketing tactics. Prerequisite: MGMT 3310. Credit 3.

      • MGT 460 International Field Studies in Management.

         Directed studies of organizational behavior, managerial functions, entrepreneurship, and small business in a study abroad program. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 4330 Compensation.

        A study of the design and functioning of the entire compensation system with emphasis on wage and salary determination, individual and group incentives, employee benefits, and non-economic rewards. Prerequisite: MGMT 3310. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 4335 Management And Labor Relations.

         A study of the legal perimeter of management labor relations, the collective bargaining process, and problems of union contract compliance. Prerequisites: MGMT 3310. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 4340 International Management And Marketing.

        A study of the decisions that managers must make in the planning, organizing, and operating of companies in cross-cultural environments. Prerequisite: MGMT 3310 and MKTG 3310. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 4345 Social Responsibility Of Management.

        A study of the role business plays in our society and the obligations and responsibility it has to society. The course examines the ethical, environmental, and cultural implications of industrial/technological societies and their history. Prerequisites: MGMT 3380. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 4350 Project Management.

         This course focuses on the planning, implementation, and control of projects. Coverage will include the nine knowledge areas and lifecycle of projects. The appropriate intellectual foundation will be established so that students can work, individually and in teams to solve project related problems. Prerequisites: MGMT 3380 and BANA 3363. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 4355 Human Resource Development.

        Provides an overview of the training discipline, identifies current issues for researchers and practitioners, and highlights coming changes in the work place and their impact on training and development in organizations. Prerequisite: MGMT 3380. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 4360 Supply Chain Management.

        A study of the marketing channels of distribution and the management of the integrated supply chain for products and services. The course addresses both upstream (suppliers) and downstream (channels of distribution) organizational members. Topics include purchasing, supplier selection/development, inter-organizational information systems, risk management, physical distribution, logistics, warehousing, channel relationships, and inventory management. Prerequisites: BANA 2372, MGMT 3310, MKGT 3310. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 4365 Service Operations Management.

        This course addresses issues pertaining to the operations function within service organizations competing in a global environment. The relationship of operations to other organizational functions will be investigated. Topics include understanding services, new service development, service quality, process improvement, location decisions, capacity planning, waiting lines,  forecasting, inventory management, and service supply relationships. Prerequisites: MGMT 3310, BANA 3360. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 4370 Operations Management.

        This course addresses issues pertaining to the operations function within manufacturing and service firms competing in a global environment. The relationship of operations to other organizational functions will be investigated. Topics include decision making, project management, forecasting, capacity planning, facilities design and location, process and product design, inventory management, and quality assurance. Prerequisites: MGMT 3380, BANA 3360. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 4375 Quality Management.

        A study of current topics in quality assurance management to include total quality control, statistical quality control, statistical process control, quality circles, and Deming’s methods. Emphasis will be placed on the systems approach to quality assurance. Prerequisites: MGMT 4370 and BANA 3363. Credit 3.

      • MGMT 4380 Problems In Management.

        The credit in this course varies according to the work performed. The student may pursue special studies for which a special course is not organized. Prerequisites: 30 hours in Business and Economics and consent of the instructor. This course may be taken for the Academic Distinction Program. Credit 1, 2, or 3.

      • MGMT 4390 Strategic Management And Policy.

        The evaluation of external environmental factors and internal organizational strengths and weaknesses for the purpose of formulating organization strategies. Prerequisites: MGMT 3380, MKTG 3310, FINC 3320, and senior standing. Credit 3.

Management Information Systems Course Descriptions

      • MGIS 2320 Business Systems Implementation.

        An introduction to the implementation of common business applications using current visual application development platforms. Basic structured and object-oriented analysis and construction techniques are taught in the context of the creation of business-oriented systems. Prerequisites: CSTE 1330 or BUAD 1305, and MATH 1324. Credit 3.

      • MGIS 3310 Management Information Systems.

        This course is designed to be an introduction to the management and use of information systems in organizations. Material presented is selected to increase the student’s literacy in this rapidly changing field, including commonly used acronyms and emerging technologies. Organizational applications of information systems will be discussed for all functional areas of the firm. Prerequisites: Passing score on College of Business Administration administered computer competency exam or BUAD 1305, CSTE 1330. Credit 3.

      • MGIS 3330 Business Database Management.

        Introduction to databases. Entity-relationship modeling and normalization are studied and applied in order to create an organizational database. Students will become better computer users, who are more knowledgeable about the uses of databases in solving business problems, and learning a new way to think about business and its information needs. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

      • MGIS 3360 Systems Analysis and Design.

        A first course describing the methods for analyzing information needs and designing, evaluating, and implementing computer-based information systems. Special attention is given to both structured and adaptive techniques for analysis and design. Basic structured and object-oriented analysis and construction techniques are taught in the context of the creation of business-oriented systems. Prerequisite: MGIS 330. Credit 3.

      • MGIS 4320 Electronic Commerce Implementation.

        An introduction to the implementation of common business applications for electronic commerce using Internet related technologies. The basics of Hypertext Markup Language (HTML), Common Gateway Interfaces (CGI), Java, and other current technologies will be covered in the context of electronic commerce applications on the Internet. Prerequisites: MGIS 3330 and MGIS 2320. Credit 3.

      • MGIS 4330 Business Database Management II.

        This course provides strategies and techniques that give students knowledge and skills for database development, design, and implementation in a multi-user business environment using Oracle DBMS software. The course covers relational database technology and focuses on design of database applications. Case studies will be used to illustrate the use of database systems for strategic and operational decision making. Emerging technologies and their applications will be covered. Students will get hands-on experience with state-of-the-art commercial relational and object-oriented database technology and learn to use SQL. Prerequisite: MGIS 3330. Credit: 3.

      • MGIS 4350 Business Network Management.

        Presentation of current and emerging telecommunications services and networking technologies with emphasis on their strengths, limitations, and business applications. Practical aspects of installing and managing networks within business organizations. Commonly used network media, operating systems, LAN and WAN technologies, inter-networking approaches and media will be presented. Prerequisites: MGIS 3330 and MGIS 2320. Credit 3.

      • MGIS 4360 Design and Implementation ERP Systems.

        This course builds on knowledge acquired in the Systems Analysis and Design class (MGIS 2320). This class studies the types of issues that managers will need to consider in implementing cross-functional integrated systems. We will examine the general nature of enterprise computing, re-engineering principles and the technical foundations of client/server systems and enterprise information architectures. We will also look at the different types of enterprise information systems, primarily SAP R/3. Topics include the tools and methodology, modules, processes, and industry initiatives. Prerequisite: MGIS 2320. Credit 3.

      • MGIS 4380 Problems in Management Information Systems.

        The credit in this course varies according to the work performed. The student may pursue studies for which a special course is not organized. Credit 1, 2, or 3.

      • MGIS 4385 Advances in Information Systems.

        A study of emerging information technologies. Class participants will learn about the technical fundamentals and business applications associated with information technologies. Prerequisite: MGIS 3330. Credit 3


Marketing Course Descriptions

      • MKTG 3310 Principles of Marketing.

        This course includes marketing functions, transportation, assembling, storage, trade channels, cost, co-operative marketing, trade association, market analysis, marketing structures and agencies, types of middlemen, international marketing, and current marketing practices. Prerequisite: ACCT 2301 and ECON 2302. Credit 3.

      • MKTG 3320 Consumer Behavior.

        A study of consumer decision-making processes in marketing and the factors that influence these processes. Prerequisite: MKTG 3310. Credit 3.

      • MKTG 3330 Sales Management.

        A study of the Selling process and the principles involved in the managing of the selling function. Provides an overview of the field of sales management and the role of the sales manager. Prerequisites: MKTG 3310. Credit 3.

      • MKT 383 MKTG 3335 Retailing.

        This course includes the evolution of retailing, the scope of retailing, store location, store layout, organization, the customer, buying markets, receiving and marketing merchandise, mark-up, stock control, merchandise plan, fashions, retail credit, accounting, insurance, and sales promotion. Prerequisite: MKTG 3310. Credit 3.

      • MKTG 3350 Services Marketing Management.

        This course examines the characteristics of the service domain. The planning, organization, production, and marketing of quality services will be the focus of the course. Prerequisites: MGMT 3310 and MKTG 3310. Credit 3.

      • MKTG 3360 Supply Chain Management.

        A study of the marketing channels of distribution and the management of the integrated supply chain for products and services. The course addresses both upstream (suppliers) and downstream (channels of distribution) organizational members. Topics include purchasing, supplier selection/development, inter-organizational information systems, risk management, physical distribution, logistics, warehousing, channel relationships, and inventory management. Prerequisite: BANA 2372, MGMT 3380, MKTG 3310. Credit 3.

      • MKTG 3370 Marketing Communication and Promotional Strategy.

        A study of contemporary issues in marketing communications. An examination of how the elements of the promotional mix, with emphasis on advertising, are used to develop effective marketing strategies. Prerequisite: MKTG 3310. Credit 3.

      • MKTG 4340 International Management and Marketing.

        Surveys the economic, cultural and political foundations of international marketing systems, the foreign consumer, product policies, and distributional structures as well as the promotional and marketing research phases of foreign operations. Available to business majors only. Prerequisite: MKTG 3310 and MGMT 3310. Credit 3.

      • MKTG 4350 Marketing Research.

        The study of methods of collecting and analyzing information to be used in determining marketing strategy and making marketing decisions. Available to business majors only. Prerequisites: MKTG 3310 and BANA 3363. Credit 3.

      • MKTG 4380 Problems in Marketing.

        The credit in this course varies according to the work performed. The student may pursue special studies for which a special course is not organized. Prerequisites: 30 hours in Business and Economics and consent of the instructor. This course may be taken for the Academic Distinction Program. Credit 1, 2, or 3.

      • MKTG 4390 Strategic Marketing Management.

        Application of managerial principles in the development and execution of marketing strategy. Available to business majors only. Prerequisite: MGMT 3310 and MKTG 3310 plus six additional hours of marketing. Credit 3.

Mathematics Course Descriptions

      • NOTE:

        TSI requirements for mathematics courses are located in the online Schedule of Classes. These requirements are in addition to any prerequisites listed below.

      • MATH 0331 Developmental Mathematics I.

        This course deals with fundamental operations involving whole numbers, fractions, decimals and percents, ratio and proportion, interpretation of graphs, geometry, and introductory algebra including axioms and properties of the real number system, fundamental operations involving algebraic expressions, first and second degree equations and inequalities in one unknown. Credit in this course may not be applied toward graduation or classification of students by hours completed.

      • MATH 0332 Intermediate Algebra.

        This course covers products and factoring of polynomials, algebraic fractions, exponents and radicals, quadratic equations, functions and graphs, applications and systems of equations. Credit in this course may not be applied toward graduation or classification of students by hours completed.

      • MATH 1314 Pre Calculus Algebra.

        Topics include a brief review of introductory algebra, variation, elementary theory of equations, functions (including exponential and logarithmic), inequalities, systems of equations, and other related topics. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Math TSI Assessment or equivalent. Credit 3.

      • MATH 1316 Plane Trigonometry.

        Topics include coordinate systems, circular functions, solutions of triangles, identities, trigonometric equations, and inverse functions. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Math TSI Assessment or equivalent.

      • MATH 1324 Mathematics for Managerial Decision Making I.

        Topics include a review of introductory algebra, equations, relations, functions, graphs, linear programming, systems of equations and matrices, and mathematics of finance. Prerequisites: Passing score on the MATH TSI Assessment or equivalent. Credit 3.

      • MATH 1332 College Mathematics.

        This course is designed to meet the objectives of Component area 2 of the core curriculum for non-business and non-science related majors. Topics may include sets, counting principles, probability, logic, linear algebra, linear programming, mathematics of finance, geometry, and calculus. Applications are emphasized. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Math TSI Assessment or equivalent. Credit 3.

      • MATH 1369 Elementary Statistics.

        This is a survey course in elementary statistics designed to acquaint students with the role of statistics in society. Coverage includes graphical descriptive methods, measures of central tendency and variation, the basic concepts of statistical inference, the notion of estimators, confidence intervals, and tests of hypotheses. Also offered as STAT 1369. Prerequisite: Passing score on the Math TSI Assessment or equivalent. Credit 3.

      • MATH 1370 Intro to Biomedical Statistics.

        Specifically suited to those seeking entrance into the Nursing profession, this elementary statistics course is designed to foster critical thinking about data. Coverage includes graphical and numerical descriptive methods; measures of central tendency and variation; the basic concepts of statistical inference; the notion of estimators, confidence intervals and tests of hypotheses. Data will be analyzed with the help of software currently used in the profession, such as SPSS and/or Minitab. Also offered as STAT 1370. Prerequisite: Passing score on the Math TSI Assessment or equivalent. Credit 3.*

      • MATH 1384 Introduction to the Foundations of Mathematics I.

        Topics include a study of sets, systems of numeration, natural numbers, integers, number theory and rational numbers. Credit in this course is applicable only toward elementary/middle school certification. Prerequisites: Passing score on the Math TSI Assessment or equivalent. Credit 3.

      • MATH 1385 Introduction to the Foundations of Mathematics II.

        Topics include basic notions of Euclidean Geometry in 2 and 3 dimensions, ratio, proportions, percents, decimals, concepts of congruence and similarity, transformational geometry and measurement. Credit in this course is applicable only toward elementary/middle school certification. Prerequisites: MATH 1384 with a grade of C or better. Credit 3.

      • MTH 142,143, 244 Calculus I, II, III.

        This sequence of courses is a unified introduction to the fundamental concepts, skills, and applications of calculus and analytic geometry.

      • MATH 1410 Elementary Functions.

        Elementary Functions and their applications, including topics from algebra, trigonometry and analytic geometry, are used to assist in the algebraic and graphical description of the following elementary functions: polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Prerequisite: Passing score on the Math TSI Assessment or equivalent. Credit 4.

      • MATH 1420 Calculus I.

        Topics include limits and continuity, the derivative, techniques for differentiation of algebraic, logarithmic, exponential and trigonometric functions, applications of the derivative and anti-differentiation, definite integral, Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 1410 with a grade of C or better. Credit 4.

      • MATH 1430 Calculus II.

        Topics include the definite integral and its applications, techniques of integration, improper integrals, Taylor’s formula and infinite series. Prerequisite: MATH 1420 with a grade of C or better. Credit 4.

      • MATH 2384 Functions and Graphs.

        The emphasis of this course is on functions and their multiple representations including linear, polynomial, logarithmic, exponential and logistic functions. Prerequisite: MATH 1385 with grade of C or better. This course may be applied only toward middle school teacher certification. Normally offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer. Credit 3.

      • MATH 2385 Fundamentals of Calculus.

        This course provides an introduction to the concepts and applications of calculus. This course may be applied only toward middle school teacher certification. Prerequisite: MATH 2384 with grade of C or better. Normally offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer. Credit 3.

      • MATH 2395 Discrete Mathematics.

        This is an applied course in discrete mathematical structures. Topics may include sets, logic, mathematical proof, computational complexity, relations, graphs, trees, boolean algebra, number theory, combinatorics, probability, recurrence relations, and finite state machines. This course is designed for computer science majors, so programming applications will be emphasized. Prerequisite: MATH 1420 and COSC 1436 with grades of C or better. Credit 3.

      • MATH 2399 Mathematics for Managerial Decision Making.

        Topics include differential and integral calculus with applications in areas such as business and economics. Prerequisite: MATH 1324 or MATH 1314. Credit 3.

      • MATH 2440 Calculus III.

        This course includes the study of the calculus of functions of several variables and topics in vector calculus including line and surface integrals, Green’s Theorem, Divergence Theorem, and Stoke’s Theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 1430 with a grade of C or better. Credit 4.

      • MATH 3300 Introduction to Mathematical Thought.

        This course includes an introduction to sets, logic, the axiomatic method and proof. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: MATH 1430 with a grade of C or better. Normally offered in the Fall and Spring. Credit 3.

      • MATH 3350 Theory of Interest.

        This course will derive the mathematical principles of such financial instruments as amount functions, interest rates and yields, force of interest, special annuity types, bonds, yield curves, and interest rate sensitivity. Also included will be a discussion of the mathematics of financial derivatives. This course covers the content on which the joint Society of Actuaries/Casualty Actuarial Society Exam FM/2 on mathematical interest theory is based. Prerequisite: grade of C or better in MATH 1430. Credit: 3. *

      • MATH 3363 Euclidean Geometry.

        This course consists of a modern development of Euclidean geometry and a limited introduction to non-Euclidean geometry. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: MATH 3300 with a grade of C or better. Normally offered in Fall and Summer II. Credit 3.

      • MATH 3376 Differential Equations.

        This course, in conjunction with MATH 4376, is intended to develop a basic competence in areas of mathematics that are used in solving problems from the physical sciences. This first course emphasizes the general solution of ordinary differential equations, including the Laplace transform and infinite series methods. Prerequisite: MATH 2440 with a grade of C or better. Normally offered in the Fall. Credit 3.

      • MATH 3377 Introduction to Linear Algebra And Matrices.

        Topics include: solving systems of linear equations, fundamental matrix theory (invertibility theorems, determinants), eigenvectors, and properties of linear transformations. Remaining topics are chosen from: Properties of general vector spaces, inner product spaces, and/or diagonalization of symmetric matrices. Prerequisite: MATH 1430 with a grade of C or better. Normally offered in the Fall and Spring. Credit 3.

      • MATH 3379 Statistical Methods in Practice.

        Topics include organization and presentation of data, measures of central tendency, dispersion, and position, probability distributions for discrete and continuous random variables, sampling techniques, parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing. Emphasis will be given to the use of statistics packages. Also offered as STA 3379. Prerequisites: 3 semester hours of mathematics and consent of instructor. Normally offered in the Fall, Spring, Summer I. Credit 3.

      • MATH 3380 Historical Perspectives of Math.

        This course is designed to present mathematical topics from a historical perspective. The number systems and computational methods of past cultures and civilizations are discussed, along with the development of number theory and trigonometry. Credit in this course is applicable only toward elementary/middle school teacher certification. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2384.

      • MATH 3381 Introduction to the Foundations of Mathematics III.

        Topics include proportions, percents, probability, data analysis, algebraic reasoning, and problem solving. Credit in this course is applicable only toward elementary/middle school certification. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 1385. Normally offered in the Fall, Spring and Summer. Credit 3.

      • MATH 3382 Foundations of Middle School Mathematics.

        Topics include relations, functions, coordinate geometry, logic, and history of mathematics. Credit in this course is applicable only toward middle school certification. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2384. Normally offered in the Fall and Spring. Credit 3.

      • MATH 3383 Geometric Measure and Transformations.

        Topics included in this course are measurement in one, two, and three dimensions, the metric system, transformational geometry, congruencies, similarities, geometric constructions, and coordinate systems. This course may be applied only toward middle school certification. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2385. Normally offered in the Fall and Spring of each year and in the Summer of odd numbered years. Credit 3.

      • MATH 3384 Foundations of Mathematics.

        This course includes an introduction to logic, concepts of proof, proof techniques, induction, and sets. It may be applied only toward middle school certification. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2385. Normally offered in the Fall and Spring and in the Summer of even numbered years. Credit 3.

      • MATH 3386 Fundamentals of Probability and Statistics.

        This course provides an introduction to probability, descriptive statistics, and inferential statistics, including regression, confidence intervals, and the construction and interpretation of tables, graphs, and charts. Technology related to the above topics will be incorporated into the course. This course may be applied only toward middle school certification. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2385. Normally offered in the Fall and Spring and in the Summer of even numbered years. Credit 3.

      • MATH 3387 Problem Solving in Middle School Mathematics.

        Topics included in this course are problem-solving strategies appropriate for middle school or junior high mathematics. The course may be applied only toward middle school certification. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 2385. Normally offered in the Fall and Spring of each year and in the Summer of odd numbered years. Credit 3.

      • MATH 3394 Numerical Methods.

        Topics include interpolation, approximations, solutions of equations, and the solution of both linear and nonlinear systems of equations. Also offered as COSC 3394. Prerequisites: COSC 1346 and MATH 1430 or consent of the instructor. Normally offered in the Spring. Credit 3.

      • MATH 3396 Operations Research I.

        Techniques for the application of the scientific method to decision making in business and government are presented through the formulation and interpretation of mathematical models for various specific real life problems. Normally offered in the Fall. Prerequisite: MATH 2399 or MATH 1430. Credit 3.

      • MATH 4361 Introductory Analysis.

        This course consists of a more thorough treatment of the material traditionally considered in elementary calculus. Topics include sets, functions, properties of the real number system and sequences. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 3300 or consent of the instructor. Normally offered in the Fall. Credit 3.

      • MATH 4366 Elementary Analysis.

        Topics include limits, continuity, differentiation, Riemann integration, infinite series and sequences and series of functions. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: MATH 4361 or consent of instructor. Normally offered in the Spring. Credit 3.

      • MATH 4367 The Evolution of Mathematics.

        An introduction to the historical development of fundamental mathematical ideas from antiquity to the present. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Normally offered in Spring. Credit 3.

      • MATH 4370 Special Topics in Mathematics.

        Normally, this course consists of readings and individual research appropriate for the undergraduate level with subject matter for study selected by mutual agreement of student and supervisor. However, special classes may be organized when there is sufficient student interest in a particular project. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisites: 6 semester hours of advanced Mathematics and consent of instructor. This course may be taken for Academic Distinction credit. See Academic Distinction Program in this catalog. Credit 3.

      • MATH 4371 Theory and Applications of Probability and Statistics I.

        Topics include basic concepts and properties of probability, random variables, statistical distributions, measures of central tendency, variance, covariance, correlation, functions of random variables, sampling distributions, and the Central Limit Theorem. Also offered as STAT 4371. Prerequisite: MATH 1430. Normally offered in the Fall. Credit 3.

      • MATH 4372 Theory and Applications of Probability and Statistics II.

        Topics include multivariate, conditional and marginal distributions, point and interval estimation, theory of estimation, maximum likelihood estimates, hypothesis testing, likelihood ratio tests, contingency analysis, and nonparametric statistics. Also offered as STAT 4372. Prerequisites: MATH 2440 and STAT 4371. Normally offered in the Spring. Credit 3.

      • MATH 4376 Topics in Applied Mathematics I.

        This course, in conjunction with MATH 3376, is intended to develop a basic competence in areas of mathematics that are used in solving problems from the physical sciences. Topics will be selected from partial differential equations, multivariable and vector calculus, and complex analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 3376 or consent of the instructor. Normally offered in the Spring. Credit 3.

      • MATH 4377 Algebraic Structures.

        Topics include groups, rings, fields, finite groups and Abelian groups. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 3300 or consent of the instructor. Normally offered in the Fall. Credit 3.

      • MATH 4384 A Survey of Mathematical Ideas.

        This course is designed to bring together and supplement the technical material of other mathematics courses in the mathematics teacher-education program and relate it to the mathematics curriculum of the secondary school. This course may be applied only toward teacher certification. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 3300. Normally offered in the Spring. Credit 3.

      • MATH 4385 Mathematical Problem Solving.

        This course focuses on solving mathematical problems including the use of proof as well as graphical and numerical methods. It extends and connects concepts from algebra, geometry, and calculus, including functions, graphs, complex numbers and number systems. This course may be applied only toward teacher certification. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 3300. Normally offered in the Fall. Credit 3.

Statistics Course Descriptions

      • STAT 1369 Elementary Statistics.

        This is a survey course in elementary statistics designed to acquaint students with the role of statistics in society. Coverage includes graphical descriptive methods, measures of central tendency and variation, the basic concepts of statistical inference, the notion of estimators, confidence intervals, and tests of hypotheses. Also offered as MATH 1369. Prerequisite: Passing score on the Math TSI Assessment or equivalent. Credit 3.

      • STAT 1370 Intro to Biomedical Statistics.

        Specifically suited to those seeking entrance into the Nursing profession, this elementary statistics course is designed to foster critical thinking about data. Coverage includes graphical and numerical descriptive methods; measures of central tendency and variation; the basic concepts of statistical inference; the notion of estimators, confidence intervals and tests of hypotheses. Data will be analyzed with the help of software currently used in the profession, such as SPSS and/or Minitab. Also offered as MATH 1370. Prerequisite: Passing score on the Math TSI Assessment or equivalent. Credit 3.*

      • STAT 3379 Statistical Methods in Practice.

        Topics include organization and presentation of data; measures of central tendency, dispersion, and position; probability distributions for discrete and continuous random variables, sampling techniques, parameter estimation, and hypothesis testing. Emphasis will be given to the use of statistical packages. Also offered as MATH 3379. Prerequisites: Three semester hours of mathematics and consent of instructor. Normally offered in the Fall, Spring, and Summer I and Summer II. Credit 3.

      • STAT 3380 Statistical Design and Analysis of Experiments.

        Topics include sampling designs and hypothesis testing in analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, and regression analysis. Design characteristics, model diagnostics, and hypothesis testing will be emphasized and work will be required on real data. The MINITAB and SAS statistics packages will be applied. Prerequisite: STAT 3379 or equivalent. Normally offered in the Spring semester. Credit 3.

      • STAT 3381 Sample Survey Methods.

        The course treats principles needed in planning and conducting sample surveys. Topics include random, stratified, systematic, and cluster sampling methods as well as subsampling techniques. Prerequisite: STAT 3379 or equivalent. Credit 3.

      • STAT 4370 Special Topics in Statistics.

        This course is designed to accommodate independent study and research with content determined by mutual agreement of student and supervisor. However, it may also be taught as a special organized class when there is sufficient student interest in a particular project. Such topics as statistical quality control, modeling and analysis, time series analysis, Monte-Carlo techniques and bootstrapping may be included. This course may be taken for Academic Distinction credit. (See Academic Distinction Program in this catalog.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Six semester hours of advanced statistics and consent of instructor. Credit 3.

      • STAT 4371 Theory and Applications of Probability and Statistics I.

        Topics include basic concepts and properties of probability, random variables, statistical distributions, measures of central tendency, variance, covariance, correlation, functions of random variables, sampling distributions, and the Central Limit Theorem. Also offered as MATH 4371. Prerequisite: MATH 1430. Normally offered in the Fall semester. Credit 3.

      • STAT 4372 Theory and Applications of Probability and Statistics II.

        Topics include multivariate, conditional and marginal distributions, point and interval estimation, theory of estimation, maximum likelihood estimates, hypothesis testing, likelihood ratio tests, contingency analysis, and nonparametric statistics. Also offered as MATH 4372. Prerequisites: MATH 2440 and STAT 4371. Normally offered in the Spring. Credit 3.

      • STAT 4373 Nonparametric Statistics.

        Topics include chi-square goodness-of-fit testing and inferences concerning location and scale. Specific tests include the sign test, Wilcoxon signed-rank test, the Kruskal-Wallis test, tests for randomness and trends, and contingency analyses. Prerequisites: STAT 3379 and consent of instructor. Credit 3.

      • STAT 4374 Regression Modeling and Analysis

        . Topics include model estimation and testing, model diagnostics, residual analysis, variables selection, and multicollinearity. Work will be required on real data with the use of the MINITAB and SAS statistics packages. Prerequisites: STAT 3379 and consent of instructor. Credit 3.


Military Science Course Descriptions

      • BASIC COURSE - MILITARY SCIENCE I AND II
      • MLSC 1101 Applied Leadership Laboratory I.

        A practical laboratory of applied leadership and skills that is required for each 1000-level Military Science Basic Course. Activities include rappelling, preliminary and advanced rifle marksmanship, first aid, field leadership reaction course and physical conditioning. Concurrent enrollment in MLSC 1101 and MLSC 1201/1202 are accepted substitutes for activity kinesiology. Three hours per week. Credit 1.

      • MLSC 1201 Foundations of Officership.

        An introduction to the United States Army, its heritage, mission, organization, goals and leadership doctrine. Two hours per week. Credit 2.

      • MLSC 1202 Basic Leadership.

        Seminar and practical application with primary focus on interpersonal communication, leadership and management of small teams/groups: professionalism and ethics are discussed. Two hours per week. Credit 2.

      • MLSC 2101 Applied Leadership Laboratory II.

        A practical laboratory of applied skills and leadership. Activities include rappelling, rifle marksmanship, basic land navigation, and fundamentals of tactics. Concurrent enrollment in MLSC 2101 and MLSC 2201/2202 are accepted substitutes for activity kinesiology. Three hours per week. Credit 1.

      • MLSC 2201 Individual Leadership Studies.

        Instruction is basic in scope and includes leadership, land navigation, written and oral communications, methods of instruction, and first aid. Two hours per week plus Applied Leadership Lab II. Credit 2.

      • MLSC 2202 Leadership and Teamwork.

        An in-depth study of leadership types, temperaments and styles, oral and written communications, radio and wire communications and career development. Two hours per week plus Applied Leadership Lab II. Credit 2.

      • MLSC 2401 Leaders’ Training Course.

        An optional four-week leadership intern program conducted during June and July at Fort Knox, Kentucky, consisting of basic leadership and adventure-type training. This course is for the student who is considering enrollment in the ROTC Advanced Course, but who does not have credit for the Basic Course. The Army provides transportation, room, board, and clothing. The student is paid approximately $750.00 for the four-week period and is eligible to compete for a two-year Army ROTC scholarship. No service obligation is incurred. Credit 4.

      • ADVANCED COURSE - MILITARY SCIENCE III AND IV
      • MLSC 3101 Applied Leadership Laboratory.

        A practical application laboratory, which is planned by the MSIV (senior) students, executed by the MSIV (senior) students, and supervised by department staff and faculty. Activities include: safety/first aid, drill and ceremony, land navigation, rappelling, rifle marksmanship, and tactics. This class is required for contracted cadets enrolled in the MLSC 3301, 3302, 4301, or 4302 classes. Three hours per week. Credit 1.

      • MLSC 3301 Leadership and Problem Solving.

        A study of military leadership utilizing light infantry organization and doctrine. Emphasis is placed on contemporary trends in leadership and management as well as on individual, team and squad military skills. Practical application for oral presentation, communication, written communications and land navigation. Three lecture hours per week plus Applied Leadership Lab. Credit 3.

      • MLSC 3302 Leadership and Ethics.

        An application of military leadership utilizing light infantry organization and doctrine. Emphasis is placed on execution of individual tasks and effectiveness in leading small units in tactical and administrative functions in preparation for the Leadership Development Assessment Course at Ft. Lewis, Washington, during the summer. Three lecture hours per week plus Applied Leadership Lab, and pre-camp preparation. Credit 3.

      • MLSC 3401 Leadership Development Assessment Course (LDAC).

        A required four-week course during June and July of practical and theoretical instruction at an Army training center. Normally attended between the junior and senior years with transportation, room and board expenses paid by the Army. Advanced Camp cadets are paid approximately $750 for the four-week period. Credit 4.

      • MLSC 4303 Special Topics in Military Science.

        Independent concentrated study on an individual basis on current topics in Military Science. Performance will be based on oral presentation, written tests and research papers. Times to be arranged with PMS. Credit 3.

      • MLSC 4301 Leadership and Management.

        An introduction to basic military staff procedures to include: command and staff organizations and function; the military writing style and procedures; and oral presentations using the military briefing style. Additionally, the course will survey professional ethics and values and how they relate to the professional Army officer. Three lecture hours per week plus Applied Leadership Lab. Credit 3.

      • MLSC 4302 Officership.

        An introduction to a variety of systems and programs that will assist the student’s transition from Cadet to Lieutenant. This course includes an introduction to battalion and company level training management and logistics; the Officer Professional Management System (OPMS); officer and noncommissioned officer evaluation reporting system (OER, NCOER); financial planning and personal affairs for the military officer; a lieutenant’s first assignment in the Army; and the Military Justice System. Three lecture hours per week plus Applied Leadership Lab. Credit 3.


Music Course Descriptions

      • MUSI 1101 Class Piano for Non-Music Majors.

        Basic techniques of piano playing. Development of musical literacy with respect to the keyboard. Designed for Music Theater Majors. Two hours lecture and practice. Hours 1.

      • MUSI 1115 Keyboard Harmony I

        The course will focus on the practical applications of interpreting simple notated music and basic harmony at the piano. Designed for the Musical Theatre major who has little familiarity with the keyboard. Hours 1.

      • MUSI 1116 Keyboard Harmony II

        The course will continue the practical application of interpreting simple notated music and basic harmony at the piano. Discussion of improvisation will be included. Designed for the Musical Theatre major. Hours 1The course will focus on the practical applications of interpreting simple notated music and basic harmony at the piano. Designed for the Musical Theatre major who has little familiarity with the keyboard. Hours 1.

      • MUSI 1160 Singers Diction – English and Italian.

        This course is designed to familiarize singers with the pronunciation of each language as sung in choral music, recital literature, and opera. Hours 1.

      • MUSI 1166 Study of Woodwinds.

        [MUSI 1166]: [MUSI 1167] Basic techniques of teaching and playing clarinet, saxophone, oboe, bassoon, and flute. Three hours lecture and practice. Hours 1. NOTE: woodwind students only take MUS 113 MUSI 1166 or 116; Brass, string and percussion players must take BOTH MUSI 1166 and 116.

      • MUSI 1181 Class Piano, Level 1.

        Basic techniques of piano playing. Development of musical skills with respect to the keyboard. Designed for the music major who has little familiarity with the keyboard. Two hours lecture and practice. Hours 1.

      • MUSI 1182 Class Piano, Level 2.

        Basic techniques of piano playing. Development of musical skills with respect to the keyboard. Prerequisite: MUSI 1181 with “C” or better; or by placement exam. Hours 1.

      • MUSI 1222 Theory of Music I.

        This course provides an intensive drill in the fundamentals of music theory followed by an introduction to tonal music of the Western tradition. After mastering basic concepts involving the visual recognition and written reproduction of key signatures, scales, intervals, rhythm, meter, triads, and seventh chords, students will study figured bass, Roman Numeral analysis, and four-voice part writing of diatonic music using triads in all inversions. This course’s content is coordinated with that of MUSICIANSHIP I (MUSI 1224). Hours 2.

      • MUSI 1223 Theory of Music II.

        This course expands the study of the fundamentals of music theory to focus on diatonic elements of the Western tradition. In addition to the continuing focus on four-voice part writing and Roman numeral analysis, students are introduced to non-chord tones and basic studies of counterpoint and phrase structure. This course’s content is coordinated with that of MUSICIANSHIP II (MUSI 1225). Prerequisite: MUSI 1222 with minimum of “C” grade; MUSI 1224 with a “C” or better; or by placement exam. Hours 2.

      • MUSI 1224 Musicianship I.

        This course provides intensive drill in identifying and reproducing the fundamental structures of music. The course content, which is coordinated with that of THEORY I (MUS 1222), is divided into practical skills and aural skills. Practical skills develop your ability to perform music. They include activities such as performing rhythmic patterns and sight-singing solfege patterns and written melodies. Aural skills improve your ability to hear music and interpret what you hear. These include exercises such as interval identification, chord identification, scale identification, rhythmic dictation, melodic dictation, and harmonic dictation. Hours 2.

      • MUSI 1225 Musicianship II.

        This course provides intensive drill in identifying and reproducing the fundamental structures of music. The course content, which is coordinated with that of THEORY II (MUSI 1223), is divided into practical skills and aural skills. Practical skills develop your ability to perform music. They include activities such as performing rhythmic patterns and sight-singing solfege patterns and written melodies. Aural skills improve your ability to hear music and interpret what you hear. These include exercises such as chord identification, rhythmic dictation, melodic dictation, and harmonic dictation. Prerequisites: MUSI 1222 and MUSI 1224 with grade of “C” or better; or by placement exam. Hours 2

      • MUSI 1226 Practical Theory I.

        This course focuses on the fundamentals of music theory and aural skills for the Musical Theatre major. Interactive performance-based methods such as sight-singing will be utilized as well as improvisation and composition. Hours 2.

      • MUSI 1227 Practical Theory II.

        This course continues the material presented in MUSI 1226 Practical Theory I. Interactive performance-based methods such as sight-singing will be utilized as well as improvisation and composition. Hours 2.

      • MUSI 1301 Introduction to The Study of Music.

        [MUSI 1301] University Core area IV course; The study of the fundamentals of music, including major and minor scales, rhythm, chords, sight-reading, and ear-training. SHOULD READ: NOT OPEN TO MUSIC MAJORS Hours 3.

      • MUSI 1303 Fundamentals of Guitar.

        Basic guitar technique for the beginning student is combined with a study of the fundamentals of music notation. Not open to music majors. No prerequisite; required for Music Therapy majors. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 1304 Fundamentals of Singing.

        A study of the physiology of vocal music production and the development of the singing voice. Emphasis on correct breathing, tone placement, vowel formations, stage presence and musical interpretation. Not open to students majoring in Music. No prerequisite: required for Music Therapy majors. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 1306 Music Appreciation.

        University Core area IV course; A general survey of music literature designed for the non-music major. Representative composers and their works are studied through recordings, lectures, reports, and live performances. No prerequisite; for non-music majors. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 2160 Singers Diction – German.

        Prerequisite: MUSI 1160. This course is designed to familiarize singers with the pronunciation of each language as sung in choral music, recital literature, and opera. Hours 1.

      • MUSI 2161 Singers Diction – French.

        Prerequisite: MUSI 1160. This course is designed to familiarize singers with the pronunciation of each language as sung in choral music, recital literature, and opera. Hours 1.

      • MUSI 2166 Study of Brasses.

        [MUSI 1168]:[MUSI 2168] Basic techniques of teaching and playing trumpet, trombone, French horn, baritone, and tuba. Three hours lecture and practice. Hours 1. NOTE: Brass players take either MUSI 2166 or MUSI 2167; woodwind, string and percussion players MUST take MUSI 2166 and MUSI 2167.

      • MUSI 2167 Study of Brasses.

        A continuation of study of the basic techniques of teaching and playing trumpet, trombone, French horn, baritone, and tuba. Three hours lecture and practice. Hours 1. NOTE: Brass players take either MUSI 2166 or MUSI 2167; woodwind, string and percussion players MUST take MUS 213 MUSI 2166 and 216.

      • MUSI 2181 Class Piano, Level 3.

        Basic techniques of piano playing. Further development of musical skills with respect to the keyboard. Prerequisite: MUSI 1182 with “C” or better; or by placement exam. Hours 1.

      • MUSI 2222 Theory of Music III.

        This course expands the study of diatonic Western musical elements to include chromatic conventions, including secondary functions, modal borrowing, Neapolitan and augmented sixth chords. A brief introduction to binary, ternary, and other formal designs expands on the study of phrase structure from THEORY II (MUSI 1223). This course’s content is coordinated with that of MUSICIANSHIP III (MUSI 2224). Prerequisites: MUSI 1223 and 1225 with “C” or better; or by placement exam. Hours 2.

      • MUSI 2223 Theory of Music IV.

        This course continues the study of the chromatic elements of Western music, followed by an introduction to Twentieth-Century music. Special emphasis is made on the analysis of tonal and post-tonal harmony and structures through score study, composition projects, and class performances. Prerequisites: MUSI 2222 and MUSI 2224 with “C” or better; or by placement exam. Hours 2.

      • MUSI 2224 Musicianship III.

        This course provides intensive drill in identifying and reproducing the fundamental structures of music. The course content, which is coordinated with that of THEORY III (MUSI 2222), is divided into practical skills and aural skills. Practical skills develop your ability to perform music. They include activities such as performing rhythmic patterns and sight-singing solfege patterns and written melodies. Aural skills improve your ability to hear music and interpret what you hear. These include exercises such as chord identification, rhythmic dictation, melodic dictation, and harmonic dictation. Prerequisites: MUSI 1223 and MUSI 1225 with grade of “C” or better; or by placement exam. Hours 2.

      • MUSI 2226 Conducting I.

        An introduction to the basic techniques of conducting choral and instrumental music. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; MUSI 1223 Theory II with “C” or better. Hours 2.

      • MUSI 2338 Introduction to Music Therapy.

        A survey of the role of music as therapy in educational, psychiatric, medical, and rehabilitative settings. No prerequisite. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 2339 Psychology of Music.

        A study of the effect of music on the mind. Topics include musical acoustics, music perception, and experimental research in music. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 2348 Survey Of Music Literature.

        University Core area IV course; Writing Enhanced The fundamentals of music terminology, standard instrumental and vocal forms, and representative composers and compositions from secular and sacred music of most eras. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisites: required for music majors and music minors; MUS 122, 124 Hours 3.

      • MUSI 2362 Advanced Guitar.

        Continuation of fundamentals of guitar with guitar techniques for advanced students combined with study of fundamentals of music notation. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 2364 History of Rock, Jazz, and Popular Music.

        University Core area IV course; A survey of the history of jazz, rock, and popular music beginning with their common origins in African, European, and late 19th-century southern folk music. Continues through the latest trends and includes discussion of individual musicians as well as stylistic details. No prerequisite; for non-music majors. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 3110 Study of Percussion.

        Basic techniques of teaching and playing all percussion instruments. Three hours lecture and practice. Hours 1.

      • MUSI 3111 Vocal Techniques for Instrumentalists.

        Basic techniques of teaching vocal music specifically for instrumentalists in the Music Education track. Three hours lecture and practice. Hour 1.

      • MUSI 3112 Instrumental Techniques for Vocalists.

        Basic techniques of teaching woodwind, brass string and percussion instruments specifically for vocalists in the Music Education track. Three hours lecture and practice. Hours 1. NOTE: vocalists are not required to take additional instrumental techniques courses.

      • MUSI 3117 Practicum in Music Therapy Early Childhood.

        Supervised pre-internship clinical experience in community settings. Prerequisite: admission to the Music Therapy program. MUS 365 MUSI 3365 must be taken concurrently. Hours 1.

      • MUSI 3118 Practicum in Music Therapy Special Needs.

        Supervised pre-internship clinical experience in community settings. Prerequisite: MUSI 3117. MUSI 3366 must be taken concurrently. Hour 1.

      • MUSI 3166 Study of Strings.

        Basic techniques of teaching and playing violin, viola, violoncello, and string bass. Three hours lecture and practice. Hour 1. NOTE: String players are required to take either MUSI 3166 or MUSI 3167; woodwind, brass and percussion players are required to take BOTH MUSI 3166 and MUSI 3167.

      • MUSI 3167 Study of Strings.

        A continuation of the study of the Basic techniques of teaching and playing violin, viola, violoncello, and string bass. Three hours lecture and practice. Hour 1. NOTE: String players are required to take either MUSI 3166 or MUSI 3167; woodwind, brass and percussion players are required to take BOTH MUSI 3166 and MUSI 3167.

      • MUSI 3336 Instrumental Skills for the Music Therapy Setting I.

        Study of instrumental skills as applied in the music therapy setting utilizing guitar, dulcimer, keyboard, percussion, and other instruments. Research findings in the music therapy literature will be used in structuring therapeutic interventions for specific music therapy populations. Prerequisite: MUSI 2181, MUSI 1303, music therapy major or music major/minor, or instructor permission. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 3337 Instrumental Skills for the Music Therapy Setting II.

        Study of instrumental skills applied in the music therapy setting, with emphasis on clinical improvisation, song writing, and popular music styles. Prerequisites: MUSI 2181, MUSI 1303, music therapy major or music major/minor, or instructor permission. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 3362 Orchestration and Analysis.

        A study of basic techniques of instrumentation, including ranges, transpositions, and characteristics of band and orchestral instruments. Practical application in the form of projects for various instrumental combinations. Prerequisite: MUSI 2222 with “C” or better. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 3363 Structure and Analysis.

        An exploration of formal Western musical structures from the common practice period, including classroom discussions, daily/weekly assignments, and one large individual analysis project. Prerequisite: MUSI 2223 with “C” or better. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 3364 Improvisation.

        Basic techniques and skills used in improvisation including standard chord changes, song structures and advanced scales and arpeggios. Prerequisites: MUSI 2223 and MUSI 2224 with “C” or better; junior standing or permission of instructor. Hours 3.

      • MUS 365W Observation and Measurement in Music Therapy.

        A study of current assessment and evaluation procedures used in music therapy and the application of observational recording techniques in educational, social, and therapeutic settings. Prerequisite: Admission to music therapy program. MUS 310X MUSI 3117 must be taken concurrently. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 3366 Music Therapy Techniques I.

        An examination of music therapy techniques used in the special education setting and current legislation related to education of students with disabilities and music/music therapy to be provided. Prerequisite: MUS 365. MUSI 3118 must be taken concurrently. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 3367 Studies in Music for Children.

        Introduction to Kodály philosophy and materials, Orff techniques and instruments, folk song analysis, solfege, Dalcorze concepts, and methods of other pedagogues in the field of elementary music. Several types of curricula for grades K-6 are presented. Prerequisite: MUSI 1223. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 3372 Advanced Orchestration.

        Study includes examination of orchestration styles of past and present composers, culminating in a final orchestration project and performance. Prerequisites: MUSI 3362 Orchestration and Analysis, junior standing or permission of the instructor. Credit 3.

      • MUSI 3376 Music History I: Antiquity to 1750.

        This course is designed to provide a chronological perspective of the development of Western music from ancient times to 1750, including representative composers, works, and genres as well as significant concepts and issues. Prerequisite: MUSI 2348 with “C” grade or better; junior standing or instructor permission. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 3377 Music History II: 1750 to the Present.

        This course is designed to provide a chronological perspective of the changes in Western music beginning in 1750 and extending up to the present, including representative composers, works, and genres as well as significant concepts and issues. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisites: MUSI 2348 with “C” grade or better; junior standing or consent of instructor. Hours 3

      • MUSI 3379 A Survey of World Music.

        This course is a selected survey of musical cultures from around the world focusing primarily on music outside the Western classical tradition. Prerequisites: MUSI 2348, sophomore standing. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 3380 Opera Literature.

        An overview of the repertory and performance practice of opera including the history of standard operas from the Baroque era to the present. Prerequisites: MUSI 2348 with “C” or better; junior standing or permission of instructor. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 3381 Song History and Literature.

        An exploration and development of understanding of the vast repertory of vocal music. Prerequisites: MUSI 2348; junior standing or permission of instructor. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 3382 Survey of Piano Literature.

        An examination of the standard piano repertoire from the Baroque era to the 20th Century. Piano majors will be required to study, discuss and perform music from the standard repertoire. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 3383 Advanced Keyboard Literature.

        A continuation of study begun in MUSI 3382. This course delves into greater detail and includes an introduction of methods for research in keyboard literature. Prerequisites: MUS 482, junior standing or permission of instructor. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 4068 Seminar in Research and Creative Activities.

        A course in which the undergraduate student may pursue advanced specialized study under faculty supervision in the areas of composition, music literature, analysis, and research. May be repeated for hours. (This course may be taken for Academic Distinction Hours. See Academic Distinction Program in this catalog.) Hours 3.

      • MUSI 4110 Practicum in Music Therapy – Psychiatric/Geriatric.

        Supervised pre-internship clinical experience in community settings. Prerequisite: MUSI 3117. MUS 495 MUSI 4395 must be taken concurrently. Hours 1.

      • MUSI 4111 Practicum in Music Therapy – Medical.

        Supervised pre-internship experience in community settings. Prerequisite: MUSI 3117. MUSI 4396 music be taken concurrently. Hours 1.

      • MUSI 4117 Recital.

        A public solo performance reflecting the work of one full semester of preparation at the upper division level under supervision of the applied music faculty. The student must be concurrently enrolled for applied music instruction and must have his/her program approved by his/her professor. A Recital Hearing must be passed at least two weeks prior to the scheduled performance. Hours 1.

      • MUSI 4224 Conducting II.

        The study and application of advanced conducting technique as applied to instrumental and choral ensembles with emphasis on the development of analytical and interpretative skills. Prerequisite: MUSI 2226; MUSI 2222 and MUSI 2224 with “C” or better; or consent of instructor. Three hours lecture. Hours 2.

      • MUSI 4322 Keyboard Pedagogy I.

        Focus on private/applied pedagogy, including the study, research, observation and application of various methodologies. Prerequisites: junior standing or permission of instructor. Hours 2.

      • MUSI 4361 Techniques for Wind and String Instruments.

        A study of the literature, methods, and teaching techniques of wind and string instruments. Performance majors may take this course by conference. Prerequisites: Senior standing for performance majors and junior standing for education majors or consent of instructor. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 4362 Vocal Pedagogy and Techniques.

        Introduction to the teaching of voice, in both the private and group settings. Students will survey different schools of approach and study of the physiology of singing. Prerequisites: junior standing. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 4365 Counterpoint and Analysis.

        A focused study of some of the forms and highly contrapuntal works of J.S. Bach with an emphasis on creative projects. The understanding of the contrapuntal devices examined in this course will enhance the student’s understanding of polyphony in Western music from all periods. Prerequisite: MUSI 2223 with “C” or better. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 4373 Electronic Music.

        Gives students an understanding of the relationships between theory and composition. This includes original and imitative work in composition, experience with acoustic and electronic media and a basic understanding of the relationships among musical structures. Prerequisites: MUSI 2223 and MUSI 2224 with “C” or better or permission of instructor. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 4375 Film Scoring.

        A study of traditional and computer based film scoring techniques as well as orchestration skills required for non-traditional instruments. Prerequisites: MUS 362, junior standing or permission of instructor. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 4384 Advanced Keyboard Sight-reading.

        This course will help students understand the multi-faceted aspects that sight-reading entails and will teach the ability to isolate these aspects. Exercises will improve the individual’s ability to sight-read. Prerequisites: junior standing or permission of instructor. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 4385 Advanced Keyboard Harmony.

        Piano majors and concentrates will experience a broader keyboard harmony training, encounter new musical challenges and reach new heights of music making. Training as artistic collaborators and soloists. Prerequisites: junior standing or permission of instructor. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 4395 Music Therapy Techniques II.

        A study of music therapy procedures used with adults in psychiatric and aging adult settings and an examination of issues concerning the use of music therapy within these populations. Prerequisites: MUS 365. MUSI 4110 must be taken concurrently. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 4396 Music Therapy Techniques III.

        A seminar presentation of contemporary issues in the field of music therapy. Prerequisite: MUS 365. MUSI 4111 must be taken concurrently. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 4397 Internship in Music Therapy.

        First three-month period of supervised clinical experience at site approved by the American Music Therapy Association (AMTA). Prerequisite: Completion of all coursework. Hours 3.

      • MUSI 4398 Internship in Music Therapy.

        Second three-month period of supervised clinical experience. Prerequisite: Completion of all coursework. Hours 3.


Newton Gresham Library Course Descriptions

        • NGLI 1101 Research in the Digital Age.

          New researchers are often overwhelmed by the sheer amount of information available on the Internet. This course teaches students to efficiently search online academic, popular, and professional resources and evaluate their credibility. Since the digital era relies heavily on images as information, students will also learn to create and evaluate an infographic, a visual representation, that reflects their research. The skills learned from this class will prepare students to be more effective researchers for every academic class. Credit 1.


Nursing Course Descriptions

          • NURS 3101 Introduction into Clinical Practice.

            An introduction to beginning nursing skills including such activities as safety, assessment of vital signs, comfort measures, assistance with daily living activities, environmental concerns, positioning and transporting. Students will become familiar with basic documentation and communication tools. 1 Credit Hour. (3-hour lab) Pre requisites: admission to SHSU nursing program. Co requisites: NURS 3430, 3420, 3310.

          • NURS 3310 Health Assessment.

            Concepts and principles underlying assessment of the health status of individuals are presented. Emphasis is placed on interviewing skills, health histories, and the physical and psychosocial findings in the well person, plus the development of communication in the nurse-client relationship and assessment skills. Students implement the nursing process by obtaining health histories, performing physical and psychosocial assessments, establishing a baseline database, and formulating initial nursing plans. This course is writing enhanced. 3 Credit Hours. (Class: 3 hours weekly) Pre requisites: admission to SHSU nursing program. Co requisites: NURS 3430, 3420, 3310.

          • NURS 3430 Nursing Fundamentals.

            An introduction to the scope of human needs, utilization of the nursing process as a systematic approach to meeting those needs, and the role of the professional nurse in assisting individuals toward optimal health. Clinical settings are utilized in the application of fundamental concepts, principles of nursing, and communication skills that are employed in providing basic client care. 4 Credit Hours. (Semester totals: Class: 2 hours weekly and Clinical/Lab 6 hours weekly) Pre requisites: admission to SHSU nursing program. Co requisites: NURS 3310, 3420, 3101.

          • NURS 3420 Pathophysiology and Pharmacology for Nursing.

            An introduction to pathophysiological and fundamental principles of pharmacological alterations in major regulatory mechanisms of the body. Special consideration of the nursing role in developing a comprehensive approach to the clinical application of pharmacologic concepts and principles to professional nursing practice. Provides a foundation for understanding general nursing practice, various diagnostic procedures, basic drug classifications, nursing implications relative to the utilization of drug therapy and selected therapeutic regimens. This course is designed to enhance critical thinking and promote effective decision- making for safe and effective care. 4 Credit Hours.Pre requisites: admission to SHSU nursing program. Co requisites: NURS 3430, 3310, 3101.

          • NURS 3350 Concepts in Nursing Practice I.

            A variety of formal and informal resources including evidence-based data will be used to orient students to the roles that nurses assume and the settings in which nursing practice meets the diverse health needs of clients. Standards of professional nursing practice and nursing theorists are introduced along with the philosophy of the School of Nursing. This course is writing enhanced. 3 Credit Hours. Pre requisites: NURS 3310, 3430, 3420, 3101. Co requisites: NURS 3360.

          • NURS 3360 Introduction to Research.

            This course focuses on fundamental concepts and processes of nursing research and emphasizes nursing research as a basis for evidence-based practice. Students will examine major steps in the research process, formulate research questions relevant to clinical nursing practice, and critique nursing research reports. This course is writing enhanced. 3 Credit Hours. Pre requisites: NURS 3310, 3430, 3420, 3101. Co requisites: NURS 3350.

          • NURS 3440 Promoting Health & Managing Health Issues for Older Adults.

            This course focuses on nursing interventions used to promote, maintain, and restore health in older adult clients. It provides students with opportunities to expand knowledge of the normal aging process; to identify variables that contribute to deviations in health; to discuss how formal and informal resources including evidence-based data contribute to older adults' health status; and to examine the implications of working collaboratively with individuals, families and communities to meet the health care needs of older adults.This course is writing enhanced. 4 Credit Hours. (Class: 2 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 6 hours weekly). Pre requisites: NURS 3310, 3430, 3420, 3101. Co requisites: NURS 3640, 3620.

          • NURS 3620 Adult Health I.

            This course introduces the student to the use of the nursing process in the care of adults with chronic or non-complex illness. The course uses a systems approach to discuss the effects of illness on the individual and family and to examine the disruption of growth and development patterns across the lifespan from young adult to senior years, emphasizing the nursing process to assist adults in reaching their optimal level of wellness. The course includes a clinical laboratory to allow the student the opportunity to apply theoretical concepts to clinical practice in diverse adult populations. 6 Credit Hours. (Class: 3 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 9 hours weekly) Pre requisites: NURS 3310, 3430, 3420, 3101. Co requisites: NURS 3440, 3640.

          • NURS 3640 Mental Health and Nursing.

            This course demonstrates the relevance of psychosocial nursing concepts to all areas of professional practice. It provides a conceptual integration of the nursing process, theories, and research from psychosocial sciences and humanities as these relate to the care of persons with mental disorders. Clinical experience provides an opportunity for application of psychosocial concepts and methods in using the nursing process to promote optimal levels of wellness for individuals, families, and target groups. It also provides students with the opportunity to develop clinical decision-making abilities when providing appropriate and culturally relevant psychiatric/mental health nursing care. This course is writing enhanced.  6 Credit Hours. (Class: 3 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 9 hours weekly). Pre requisites: NURS 3310, 3430, 3420, 3101. Co requisites: NURS 3440, 3620.

          • NURS 4250 Concepts in Nursing Practice III.

            This course provides the opportunity for students to synthesize issues such as career development, health policy, and workplace advocacy, into their working method. Other issues including information technology, ethics, and cultural awareness (which have been previously introduced) are explored more thoroughly to assist the graduate's entry into practice. This course is writing enhanced. 2 Credit Hours. Pre requisites: NURS 3350, 3360, 4440, 4420, 4630. Co requisites: NURS 4620, 4660.

          • NURS 4420 Child and Adolescent Nursing.

            This course uses the nursing process to promote, protect and maintain the health of infants, children and adolescents and it provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to develop the cognitive, psychomotor and affective skills necessary for therapeutic interventions of these populations. Students will examine the biological and psychosocial parameters, legal and ethical dimensions, resources, and cultural influences affecting nursing care strategies for infants, children and adolescents. 4 Credit Hours. (Class: 2 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 6 hours weekly) Pre requisites: NURS 3620, 3640, 3440, 3350, 3360. Co requisites: NURS 4440, 4630.

          • NURS 4440 Women’s Health and Maternal-Newborn Nursing.

            This course examines childbearing families and women’s health in normal and high-risk situations and the role of the nurse in meeting health needs of women, families and their newborns. Supervised clinical experiences and/or simulation experiences in the application of the nursing process in meeting these health needs are offered and promotes the acquisition of skills in caring for women, families and newborns during uncomplicated and/or complicated health experiences in a variety of settings. 4 Credit Hours. (Class: 2 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 6 hours weekly). Pre requisites: NURS 3620, 3640, 3440, 3350, 3360. Co requisites: NURS 4420, 4630.

          • NURS 4620 Adult Heath Nursing II.

            This course presents to the senior students critical thinking and problem-solving strategies for care of adults with acute or complex illness and injuries. The effects of acute illness are examined in relation to the injury, as well as in relation to the individual’s developmental stage, culture, and gender. Building on the Nursing Care of Adults Health I, a systems approach is used to analyze and intervene in alterations to the health of the individual and family, and to help them reach their optimal level of wellness. The course includes clinical laboratory to allow the student the opportunity to integrate theoretical concepts into clinical practice in diverse populations. 6 Credit Hours. (Class: 3 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 9 hours weekly) Pre requisites: NURS 3350, 3360, 4440, 4420, 4630. Co requisites: NURS 4660, 4250.

          • NURS 4030 Community Nursing.

            This course focuses on the synthesis of public health concepts within a preventive framework to promote and maintain the health of communities and includes an examination of the historical development, philosophy, health care systems, epidemiology, and nursing care of specific populations and groups in the community. Primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of prevention are emphasized as they relate to the natural history of disease in individuals, families, and groups. A community health assessment is completed using census data, morbidity and mortality rates, epidemiologic and statistical methods, and community-based research. Progressively more independent behaviors are expected of students in community health practice. This course is writing enhanced. Variable Credit Hours. (Class: 3 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 9 hours weekly) Pre requisites: NURS 3620, 3640, 3440, 3350, 3360. Co requisites: NURS 4420, 4440.

          • NURS 4060 Leadership and Management.

            This course focuses on the knowledge and skills related to the delivery of health services from a nursing management knowledge-base. It presents theories, concepts, and models of health care delivery. Students explore creative roles for managing and leading in nursing. They will gain theoretical knowledge and skills to understand organizations, understand leadership theories, and utilize critical thinking in making nursing management decisions. This course is writing enhanced.  Variable Credit Hours. (Class: 2 hours weekly Clinical/Lab: 12 hours weekly). Pre requisites: NURS 3350, 3360, 4440, 4420, 4630. Co requisites: NURS 4620, 4250.


Physics Course Descriptions

          • PHYS 1101 General Physics Laboratory I.

            Credit 1.

          • PHYS 1102 General Physics Laboratory II.

            Credit 1.

          • PHYS 1105 Fundamentals of Physics I Laboratory.

            Credit 1.

          • PHY 1107 Fundamentals of Physics II Laboratory.

            Credit 1.

          • PHYS 1111 Introductory Astronomy Laboratory.

            Credit 1

          • PHYS 1112 Laboratory - Stars and Galaxies.

            This laboratory will introduce students to the tools and techniques used by ancient and modern astronomers to determine the nature of stars, galaxies, the interstellar medium, and the universe as a whole. This is a companion course to PHY 1312. Credit 1.

          • PHYS 1301 General Physics Mechanics and Heat.

            A modern treatment is made of the laws and principles of mechanics and heat. Derivations are carefully done using a non-calculus approach and considerable problem work is required. The laboratory work consists of quantitative experiments. Prerequisite: Credit or registration for MATH 1316 or equivalent. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 1302 General Physics Sound, Light, Electricity and Magnetism.

            The course is a continuation of PHYS 1301, covering the subjects of sound, light, electricity and magnetism. The same emphasis is placed on derivations and problem solving as in PHYS 1301. The laboratory work consists of quantitative experiments. Prerequisites: PHYS 1301, MATH 163. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 1305 General Physics for Non-Science Majors.

            This course is for liberal arts students. It is NOT open to students majoring in programs offered by Chemistry, Physics, Biological Sciences, Geology, or Mathematics. Concepts and principles are stressed. No Mathematics or Physics prerequisites.

          • PHYS 1305 Fundamentals Of Physics I.

            This is an elementary course covering the fundamentals of motion, forces, and heat. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 1307 Fundamentals of Physics II.

            The course is a continuation of PHY 1305. Fundamentals of electricity and magnetism, sound, light, and modern physics are included. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 1311 Introductory Astronomy.

            The development of astronomy, the solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology are studied. Emphasis is placed on discovering astronomical phenomena through individual observational activities. The Sam Houston planetarium and observatory are also used in laboratory activities. No mathematics or physics prerequisites. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 1312 Stars and Galaxies.

            The study of the universe beyond the solar system. Topics include the nature of stars, stellar evolution, galaxies, quasars, cosmology, the universe as a whole, and theories about the origin and fate of the universe. Along the way, students will be introduced to tools astronomers use to determine such properties as temperatures, compositions, motions, masses, and evolution of astronomical objects. (PHYS 1311 IS NOT A PREREQUISITE FOR THIS COURSE!) Credit 3.

          • PHY 138, PHY 139 General Physics.

            These courses are designed for students majoring in biological sciences and their related pre-professional programs.

          • PHY 141, 142, 245 Introduction to Physics.

            These are comprehensive courses for students majoring or minoring in physics, pre-engineering, mathematics, and programs requiring calculus level mathematics.

          • PHYS 1411 Introduction to Physics I.

            A thorough introduction to the more general topics in mechanics. Considerable attention is given to the solution of problems with the emphasis placed on fundamental concepts. A laboratory/problem session is an integral part of the course. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisites MATH 1420. If high school physics or calculus has been taken, then MATH 1420 may be taken concurrently. Credit 4.

          • PHYS 1422 Introduction to Physics III.

            An introduction to the general topics of electricity and magnetism, and basic electrical circuits. The emphasis continues to be on problem solving with the laboratory/problem session an integral part of the course. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisites: PHYS 1411 and MTH 1430.

          • PHYS 2426 Introduction to Physics II.

            An introduction to topics in heat and wave motion including sound and light. The quantitative description of phenomena is emphasized. The laboratory continues as an integral part of the course. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisites: PHYS 1411 and MATH 1420. Credit 4. Credit 4.

          • PHYS 3111 Modern Physics Laboratory I.

            Writing Enhanced. Credit 1.

          • PHYS 3317 Astronomy Laboratory.

            Writing Enhanced. Credit 1.

          • PHYS 3360 Statics and Dynamics.

            Study of equilibrium, kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies using concepts of force, mass, and energy, and momentum. Vectors, calculus and differential equations are used. Prerequisites: PHYS 1411 and MTH 2440. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 3370 Introduction to Theoretical Physics.

            This course covers the relationship of theoretical physics and mathematics. It will help the students apply mathematics to problems in physics with emphasis on the theoretical aspects of classical mechanics, electromagnetism, wave mechanics, and computational physics. Prerequisites: PHYS 1422, PHYS 2426, and MATH 2440. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 3391 Modern Physics I.

            Relativity is introduced, quantum theory of light, Compton effect, photoelectric effect, Bohr atom, particles as waves, quantum mechanics in one dimension, tunneling, and atomic structure are covered. Prerequisites: PHY 243 and MATH 2440. PHYS 3111 must be taken concurrently. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 3395 Electronics and Circuit Analysis.

            Active circuit analysis, analog and digital integrated circuits, selected discrete components, and application to certain digital and analog systems are studied. PHYS 3115 must be taken concurrently. Credit 3. PHYS 3115 Electronics and Circuit Analysis Laboratory. Writing Enhanced. Credit 1.

          • PHYS 3397 Astronomy.

            A study is made of the solar system, sun, stars, and stellar systems, their motions, structure, energy sources and evolution, star clusters, interstellar matter, galaxies, and cosmology. PHYS 3117 must be taken concurrently. Credit 3.

          • PHY 313 Modern Physics Laboratory II.

            Writing Enhanced. Credit 1.

          • PHY 393 Modern Physics II.

            Statistical physics, lasers, molecular structure, solid state, superconductivity, low energy nuclear physics, nuclear physics applications, and elementary particles are covered. Prerequisite: PHYS 3391. PHY 313 must be taken concurrently. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 4110 Advanced Undergraduate Laboratory I.

            This laboratory course provides additional, in-depth laboratory experience for physics majors and minors and transfer students. It will emphasize measurement and data handling. Writing Enhanced. Credit 1.

          • PHYS 4113 Light and Optics Laboratory.

            Writing Enhanced. Credit 1.

          • PHYS 4331 Physics for the Forensic Sciences.

            Forensic science makes use of a number of physical techniques. This course is designed to provide a student with an understanding of the physics used in forensic science that enhances the standard introductory physics course. Topics covered include interior and exterior ballistics, optics, stress and strain, elementary fluid mechanics. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 4333 Light and Optics.

            The wave theory of light is emphasized. The phenomena of interference, diffraction and polarization are treated both theoretically and in selected laboratory experiments. The theory and applications of lasers are discussed and investigated in the laboratory. PHYS 4113 must be taken concurrently. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 4366 Introductory Quantum Mechanics.

            This course includes introductory quantum mechanics, application of quantum theory to the harmonic oscillator, potential barriers, the hydrogen atom, theory of atomic spectra, the free electron, and elementary band theory of solids. Prerequisite: PHYS 3391. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 4367 Introduction to Solid State Physics.

            This course introduces the concepts of crystal structure, crystal diffraction, reciprocal lattices, crystal binding, phonons, free electron Fermi gas, semi-conductors, energy bands, Fermi surfaces, point defects, and optical properties of crystals. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 4368 Electricity and Magnetism.

            Properties of dielectrics and magnetic materials, electromagnetic fields, and Maxwell’s equations are studied. Prerequisite: MATH 3376. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 4370 Classical Mechanics.

            The dynamics of rigid bodies, vibrating systems and normal coordinates, and other selected topics of advanced mechanics are stressed. Lagrangian and Hamiltonian concepts are introduced. Prerequisite: MATH 3376. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 4371 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics.

            Basic concepts of classical thermodynamics, including the first and second laws, properties of gases, entropy, thermodynamic functions, and introductory statistical mechanics are studied. Prerequisites: PHYS 3391 and MATH 3376. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 4395 Undergraduate Research.

            This course consists of special projects or topics in experimental or theoretical physics for individual physics students. Each student pursues an approved project of interest to him, or he may participate in one of the organized research programs conducted by the physics faculty. The projects are supervised by the physics faculty, but each student is expected to demonstrate individual initiative in planning and conducting the research program or topic. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: consent of Department Chair. The course may be repeated for an additional three semester hours credit with consent of Department Chair. This course should be taken in addition to hours required for physics major or minor and may be taken for Academic Distinction credit. See Academic Distinction Program in this catalog. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 4396 Selected Topics in Physics.

            Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. May be repeated for additional credit. Credit 3.

          • PHYS 4398 Senior Thesis.

            This is a directed elective for senior students majoring in physics seeking additional experience in a sophisticated research project. This research will be conducted under the supervision of a member of the physics faculty and the results will be presented in the form of a thesis. Writing Enhanced.


Philosophy Course Descriptions

          • PHIL 2303 Critical Thinking.

            Designed to improve students’ ability to think critically. The course covers the fundamentals of deductive reasoning, the identification of common fallacies, and an introduction to inductive reasoning, as well as sensitizing the students to some of the ways information is distorted, e.g., by advertising and news management. Credit 3.

          • PHIL 2306 Contemporary Moral Issues.

            A study of major moral issues in contemporary society. Includes topics such as abortion, euthanasia, censorship, capital punishment, and other issues that confront today’s society. Credit 3.

          • PHIL 2352 Introduction to Contemporary Logic.

            Introduces the student to the principles of ordered thought and to the terminology and rules of symbolic logic. Discusses the logic of statements and the logic of predicates, quantifiers, and identity. Credit 3.

          • PHIL 2361 Introduction to Philosophy.

            A general examination of the fields and issues of philosophy as discussed by both classical and modern philosophers. Philosophical problems discussed include the existence of God, the nature of knowledge and truth, the issue of human free will, and theories of moral judgment. Credit 3.

          • PHIL 3364 Ancient and Medieval Philosophy.

            A survey of philosophical thought from the time of the pre-Socratics to about 1500. Includes the study of the work of Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Hellenistic schools, and medieval philosophy through the late scholastic period. The artistic, scientific, ethical, political and general cultural ramifications of the major systems of thought are noted. Credit 3.

          • PHIL 3365 Modern Philosophy.

            A survey of philosophical thought from about 1500 through the twentieth century. The course will examine the philosophical significance of the rise of modern science, the classical philosophies of rationalism, empiricism, the philosophy of Kant, and the development of these philosophies through the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Credit 3.

          • PHIL 3366 Aesthetics.

            An inquiry into the nature and meaning of art. Analysis of aesthetic experience, the relation of art to value, and an examination of aesthetic theories concerning representation, form and expression. This course satisfies 3 semester hours of the fine arts requirement for the BA degree program. Credit 3.

          • PHIL 3367 Philosophy of Religion.

            An examination of the nature and meaning of religion and religious expression. Philosophical and scientific critiques of religious faith and experience are considered. The nature of faith and reason, the question of the existence and nature of God, and the relation of religion and value are typical course topics. Credit 3.

          • PHIL 3371 Existentialism and Self-Awareness.

            An examination of the major themes of existentialism and its impact on contemporary society. Existential works from literature, psychology, psychoanalysis, and religion are included. Examines the existential concepts of anxiety, fear, guilt, meaninglessness, death, and authentic and inauthentic existence. Taught with PSY 371. Credit 3.

          • PHIL 3372 Philosophy of Science.

            A survey of topics in philosophy of science including the logic of explanations in the physical and social sciences, the relations of science to the realm of values, and a look at the “mind-body problem”. Credit 3.

          • PHIL 4306 Philosophy of Biology.

            A seminar course investigating philosophical questions concerning the development and application of evolutionary theory. This course addresses issues relating to concepts such as adaptation, speciation, the comparative method, levels of selection, and phylogenetic reconstruction. Credit 3.

          • PHL 4333 Bioethics.

            This course is a survey of bioethics. In this class students will use various ethical theories and moral principles to analyze and critically evaluate moral dilemmas in medicine. This course covers a broad range of issues including: 1) the patient-physician relationship, 2) bias in medicine, 3) health care delivery systems and 4) the ethics of research. To enhance critical thinking skills and decision making skills, students will be required to develop and defend views on given bioethical issues. Pre-requisite: sophomore standing. Credit: 3.

          • PHIL 4361 Philosophy of Psychology and MInd.

            This course will examine a range of contemporary theories of mind and the primary objections they face. Topics may include: Mind/brain identity theory and reductionism, the nature and function of consciousness, the nature of rationality and its relation to consciousness, the possibility of machine intelligence, and the nature of mental representation. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Credit 3

          • PHIL 4363 Ethical Theories.

            This course will cover classical views about the foundation of ethics such as divine commands, cultural relativism, subjectivism, egoism, utilitarianism, Kantianism, and virtue ethics. Significant attention will also be given to a variety of contemporary approaches to understanding ethics.

          • PHIL 4371 Death and Dying.

            An examination of the philosophical reflections on death and dying from the literature of philosophy, psychology, theology, medicine and other contemporary sources. Course includes discussions of the nature of grief, sorrow, anxiety, fear, and suicide as related to death, and the social implications of death for the individual, family, friends, and community. Credit 3.

          • PHIL 4372 Theories of Knowledge and Reality.

            This course is a study of issues concerning the basic categories of reality such as individuals and universals, time and change, mind and body. A study of issues in the theory of knowledge such as the distinction between knowledge and belief, the criteria of knowledge, and the justification of knowledge claims is also examined. Prerequisite: 6 hours of philosophy and Sophomore Standing. Credit 3.

          • PHIL 4380 Seminar in Philosophy.

            Affords students a chance for in-depth study of a particular topic or area in philosophy not covered fully in the other course offerings and a chance for participation in a course conducted on a seminar basis. As the topics vary, the course may be repeated for credit. Credit 3.

          • PHIL 4385 Readings in Philosophy.

            This course is designed especially for advanced students who are capable of independent study. The particular program of study for the course must be discussed in advance with the prospective instructor. Admission to the course requires permission of the instructor. Credit 3.


Political Science Course Descriptions

          • POLS 2305 American Government.

            This course offers an overview of American government at the national level. Topics include the origin and evolution of the U.S. Constitution, political behavior and attitudes, political parties, interest groups, the media, and the three branches of government - Congress, the Executive Branch, and the Judiciary. A goal of the course is to equip students with the knowledge to engage in political and civic life. .

          • POLS 2306 Texas Government.

            This course examines Texas government and politics, including political culture, the Texas Constitution, Texas' role in the federal system; individuals' political values and participation, interest groups, parties, elections and camapaigns, the legislative, executive, and judical branches, and fiscal, social, and economic policies. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3302 Introduction to Public Policy.

            This is a study of national and state public policy. Both the policy process and the substances of selected policies will be examined. Topics may inlude foreign policy, civil liberties, health care, social issues, economic problems, environmental policy, and others. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3331 Local Political Systems.

            An introduction to the structure, process, and politics of local governments in Texas and the nation. Topics covered range from Metropolitan governments to special districts to county government. Rural and small town politics are also a focus of attention, along with urban and suburban political structures. Home rule, leadership recruitment and behavior, local elections, budgeting, services, and intergovernmental relations are addressed. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3332 State Political Systems.

            A comparative analysis of politics in the fifty states, including Texas. Variations and similarities in state politics are examined, described, and related to other features of the states. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3334 Judicial Systems.

            An orientation course for pre-law students and others interested in the legal aspects of government. Emphasis is placed on the development of judicial systems and the policy making role of courts. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3335 Politics of Ethnic Minorities and Gender.

            A study of political theory, behavior, beliefs, and public policy as they relate to race, ethnicity, and gender in the United States. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3336 The Presidency and Executives.

            A study of the office of President including the institutionalization of the presidency along with a consideration of state governors and the heads of local governing bodies in the United States. Emphasis is placed on comparative development, roles, structures, processes, and functions. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3337 The Congress and Legislatures.

            An examination of the powers, organization, procedures, and operations of legislative bodies in the United States. Consideration is given to such matters as selection of legislators, legislative leadership, influence of lobbyists, political parties, legislative committees, executives, and legislative roles and norms. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3338 Victims' Rights Politics and Policies.

            This course introduces students to the politics and policies of victims' rights. The course examines the emergence of victims' rights as a political issue and as a social movement. The course surveys victims' rights policies and programs at the local, state, national, and international level and analyzes their development, their implementation, and their impact. This is the introductory course for the Victim Studies Program. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3339 The Roles of Nonprofit Organizations.

            This course introduces students to the history, roles, and types of nonprofit organizations and offers students an overview of the development of nonprofit organizations. Topics covered in the course include: nonprofit and government relations, nonprofit and business relations, nonprofit and policymaking, nonprofits in an international context, and organizational issues. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3360 Political Parties and Interest Groups.

            This course is a survey of political parties and interest groups in U.S. politics. Topics include the development and evolution of political parties and interest groups, their organizations and functions, and their role in politics. Consideration is given to the influence of parties and interest groups on political values, participation, voting, campaigns and elections, governing, and on policy. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3361 Central and Eastern European Politics.

            This course offers a comparative study of the political systems of Central and Eastern European states, including the European portions of the former Soviet Union, with emphasis on the problems of transition from communism to democracy and market economy. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3364 Politics and the Media.

            The primary focus of this course is on the role and impact of the media on US politics. The relationship between the media and politics in other nations may also be considered. (Media is defined broadly to include the Internet, radio, television, and the various forms of print media.) Some of the topics that may be explored in the course include: the impact of the media on campaigns and election outcomes, the media as a source of political information, the agenda setting power of the media, the role of the “free press” in a democracy, and citizens’ relationship to the media. The course makes use of textbooks but also relies heavily on media product being offered each day through the various contemporary media. Prerequisite: 3 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3365 Comparative Survey of World Political Systems.

            A survey of important issues and trends in world political systems that places American government and politics in a comparative context. Included will be terminology, concepts, and methods of comparative politics. Topics may include institutions, behavior, constitutional processes, political parties and interest groups, public policy, political development, transitions from authoritarianism to democracy and from statist to market economies, sources of domestic violence, and other major concerns of the field. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3366 Introduction to Public Administration.

            A survey of national public administration with emphasis on the political processes within the surrounding administrative agencies. Topics include development of the administrative function, policy formulation and budgeting, the relations of administrators to Congress, interest groups, courts and the public. State and local topics may be included. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3368 Asian Politics.

            A comparative survey of contemporary politics and government in Asia. The course encompasses most of the countries of East Asia: China, Japan, the Koreas, and Southeast Asia, including Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Vietnam and Cambodia. Time permitting, the course may also include India and South Asia. Considerable attention is given to the history and culture of each country as well as the dynamics of change in the region. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3369 Religion and Politics.

            This course examines the historical and contemporary relationship between religion and politics. Topics include politics and religion in the United States, the proper role of religion in American public life, the relation between religion and state in the Islamic world, religion and conflict situations, and the role of religion in conflict resolution. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3370 Western European Politics.

            A comparative survey of contemporary politics and governments in Western Europe. The course typically concentrates on Britain, France, Germany, and Italy, but usually includes other important and interesting countries, such as Belgium, the Netherlands, Spain, Portugal, and the Scandinavian countries. The European Union - its policies, institutions, and expansion - is fully treated in the course. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3374 Quantitative Methods for Political Science

            This is an introduction to research design and quantitative methods used in contemporary political science research. Students will apply the tools of social science inquiry in a series of projects designed to examine such phenomena as political attitudes and behavior. Emphasis is on the use of descriptive statistics; tabular and graphic presentation of data; measures of association and correlations; and multivariate analysis in political research. POLS Majors Only. Prerequisites: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3375 Politics of the Middle East

            A comparative survey of contemporary patterns of government and politics in the Middle East. The course encompasses most of the countries of the Middle East, including Egypt, Israel, Lebanon, Jordan, Saudi Arabia, the Gulf States, Iraq, Iran, and Turkey. North Africa may also be included. Considerable attention is given to the historical legacies and continuing impact of colonialism and nationalism, political Islam and secularism, challenges of authority, and legitimacy. The impact on the region and U.S. foreign policy of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and regime change in the region is covered at length. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3377 Survey of Political Theory.

            A survey of the political ideas, philosophers, and relevant historical events in Western Europe over the past two thousand years. Representative political writings from the time of Plato to Nietzsche are surveyed. Political ideas and values are addressed in their original historical context as well as independently of any particular historical or cultural limitations. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3378 American Political Thought.

            This course surveys American political ideas and movements from colonial times to the present. Prerequisites: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3379 Research and Writing in Political Science.

            This course has two primary objectives. First, students will gain knowledge of basic research methods and design in the social sciences. Particular attention will be given to survey research. Second, students will learn research and writing skills including: how to locate, evaluate, and cite electronic and printed sources; how to conduct a literature review; how to write proposals, reports, and research papers; and how to edit proposals, reports, and papers. POLS Majors only. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3380 Introduction to International Relations.

            This course provides analysis of the relations between nation-states in the international system and the factors influencing their behavior. The changing nature of the international system is analyzed, as are the political and economic sources of tension, war and diplomacy, international law and organization, and the bases of power. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3381 American Foreign Policy.

            This course examines the domestic and international forces which influence the development of American foreign policy. The course emphasizes the post-World War II era and includes discussion of such major issues of U.S. foreign policy as the settlement of World War II, the politics and crises of the Cold War, and America’s role in the post-Cold War world order. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3385 International Organization and International Law.

            This course is a comprehensive overview of the role of international organizations and law. Specifically it examines the evolution of the United Nations and its precursors, its structure and governance role in international peace and security, emerging human rights law, laws governing war, and issues of development and the global environment. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3386 International Political Economy.

            This course examines the interplay between states and markets and the interaction of the world economy and international politics. We study the nature of political economy, the major ideologies and approaches, and specific topics such as the political ramifications of international trade, investment, debt and financial markets and the impact of globalization on the human condition and the environment. Prerequisite 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 4081 Politics and Film.

            This course is designated to examine special topics which cut across the usual areas of concentration in government. A single topic will be considered each semester this course is offered. Topics may include political socialization, ethnic politics, crises in political systems, research techniques, and other subjects. May be repeated when topic varies. Prerequisites: 6 hours of POLS.

          • POLS 4334 Constitutional Law I: Civil Rights & Liberties.

            This course is a rigorous examination of the development of rights and liberties through the interpretation of the Bill of Rights by the United States Supreme Court. The course relies on the Court’s opinions and is the first course in the two-part constitutional law sequence.  Prerequisites:  6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 4335 Constitutional Law II: Governmental Powers/State-Federal Relations

            This course offers a rigorous examination of the development of government powers at the state and federal level through the interpretation of the Constitution by the United States Supreme Court.  It is the second course in the two-part constitutional law sequence.  Prerequisites: 6 hours in POLS.  Credit 3.

          • POLS 4372 Political Attitudes and Behavior.

            An examination of political socialization, political recruitment, voting behavior, and public policy outputs. The approaches examined include role, group, political culture, systems analysis, and functional analysis. Prerequisites: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 4377 Gender and Political Theory

            This is a discussion-based class intended for those who have either familiarity with or interest in political philosophy.  The aim is to revisit some of the foundational texts of the so-called ‘Western canon’ with a specific feminist perspective and to seek the political philosophical implications of selected feminist approaches.  The course has a dual focus:  it is a content class that introduces participants to a particular way of reading and interpreting texts, and it is a skills class that trains participants in critical thinking by asking them to formulate their own questions.  Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS.  Credit 3.

          • POLS 3380 Introduction to International Relations.

            An analysis of the relations between nation-states in the international system and the factors influencing their behavior. The changing nature of the international system is analyzed, as are the political and economic sources of tension, war and diplomacy, international law and organization, and the bases of power. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3385 International Law and Organization

            This course is a comprehensive overview of the role of international organizations and law. Specifically it examines the evolution of the United Nations and its precursors, its structure and governance role in international peace and security, emerging human rights law, laws governing war, and issues of development and the global environment. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3386 International Political Economy

            This course examines the interplay between states and markets and the interaction of the world economy and international politics.  We study the nature of political economy, the major ideologies and approaches, and specific topics such as the political ramifications of international trade, investment, debt and financial markets and the impact of globalization on the human condition and the environment. Prerequisite 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3387 Latin American Politics.

            A survey of contemporary patterns of government and politics in Latin America with emphasis on institutions, processes, behavior, and problems of democracy, authoritarianism, and political development in selected nations. Historical, social, and economic background factors are also considered, along with major issues of U.S.-Latin American relations. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3391 Government Organization and Management.

            Comparison of governmental organizations within society and analysis of the differences and their impact upon practices of administration in public agencies. Consideration is also given to the management tools available to governmental agencies and their capabilities and limitations. Prerequisites: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3392 Economic Policy.

            A general study of the role of modern government in the economy and society. Particular attention is given to governmental activity in regulating and promoting business activity. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3393 Social Policy.

            A general study of the roles, actions, and problems of modern governments in dealing with social issues such as education, health, housing, transportation, and welfare services. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 3395 Environmental Policy.

            A survey of the major environmental issues and policies existing in the United States and the world today. An in-depth investigation of such environmental policy areas as clean air and water, endangered species, invasive alien species, public land management, ecosystem management, the conservation of biodiversity, nuclear power, waste disposal and energy production and use. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 4381 Problems in Political Science.

            This course is designed to examine special topics which cut across the usual areas of concentration in government. A single topic will be considered each semester this course is offered. Topics may include political socialization, ethnic politics, crises in political systems, research techniques, and other subjects. May be repeated when topic varies. Prerequisites: 6 hours of POLS. Credit 3. 

          • POLS 4095 Directed Studies and Internships in Political Science.

            This course is designed especially for advanced students in Political Science who are capable of independent study. Work may involve advanced readings, directed research, or assignment as an intern in a political or government office. Registration is upon the approval of the Chair of the Department of Political Science and the instructor directing the course. This course may be taken for Academic Distinction Credit. Prerequisites: 12 hours of Political Science and departmental permission. Credit 1-3.

          • POLS 4334 Constitutional Law I: Civil Rights and Liberties.

            This course is a rigorous examination of the development of rights and liberties through the interpretation of the Bill of Rights by the United States Supreme Court. The course relies on the Court’s opinions and is the first course in the two-part constitutional law sequence. Prerequisites: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 4335 Constitutional Law II: Governmental Powers/State-Federal Relations.

            This course offers a rigorous examination of the development of government powers at the state and federal level through the interpretation of the Constitution by the United States Supreme Court. It is the second course in the two-part constitutional law sequence. Prerequisites: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 4338 Grant Research and Writing.

            This course teaches students grant research and writing skills as well as introduces students to the many sources for grants. Topics covered in the course include: identifying key grant sources, matching grant proposals to grant sources, planning grants, and writing successful grant proposals. Prerequisites: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 4372 Political Attitudes and Behavior.

            An examination of political socialization, political recruitment, voting behavior, and public policy outputs. The approaches examined include role, group, political culture, systems analysis, and functional analysis. Prerequisites: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 4377 Gender and Political Theory.

            This is a discussion-based class intended for those who have either familiarity with or interest in political philosophy. The aim is to revisit some of the foundational texts of the so-called ‘Western canon’ with a specific feminist perspective and to seek the political philosophical implications of selected feminist approaches. The course has a dual focus: it is a content class that introduces participants to a particular way of reading and interpreting texts, and it is a skills class that trains participants in critical thinking by asking them to formulate their own questions. Prerequisite: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 4383 International Human Rights.

            This course explores the theory and practical meaning of human rights. Issues covered may include the definition of human rights; the relationship between civil and political rights and economic, social and cultural rights; the meaning and impact of humanitarian and international human rights law; the impact of cultural relativism in the definition and assessment of the promotion and protection of human rights; the significance of different religious perspectives; the question of the legitimacy of humanitarian interventions; and the effects of globalization on human rights perceptions and practices. Prerequisites: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 4384 Conflict Studies.

            This course examines the causes of international conflict and the path to international peace. The topics explored include the changes in the nature of war, the theories of the onset of interstate war, and the various methods of achieving peace. Prerequisites: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.

          • POLS 4385 Political Violence and Terroism.

            This course focuses on political violence that occurs within states perpetrated by the state against its own citizens as well as the violence that accompanies anti-government movements. Students examine cases and theories of political violence, as well as methods of their resolution. Domestic political violence in the form of state repression, domestic terrorism, guerilla warfare, civil wars, and revolution are given special emphasis. Prerequisites: 6 hours in POLS. Credit 3.


Psychology Course Descriptions

          • PSYC 1301 Introduction to Psychology.

            This course is designed to be a broad survey of the field of psychology covering such topics as learning, perception, personality, development, psychopathology, etc. It covers both the theoretical basis and the empirical content of these areas. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 2302 Introduction to Research Methods.

            This course is designed to introduce the student to the scientific method in general and research methodology in psychology in particular through laboratory and field experiments. Laboratory period required. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 2102 Introduction to Research Methods: Lab.

            Laboratory to be taken concurrently with PSYC 2302. Credit 1.

          • PSYC 2305 Professional Psychology.

            A survey is made of clinical/counseling psychology, e.g. psychopathology, diagnostic instruments, methods and techniques; individual and group psychotherapy, theories, community psychology; professional ethics of the clinical/counseling psychologist. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 2315 Psychology of Adjustment.

            A study is made of the dynamics of human behavior applying psychological theory to the development of the wholesome well adjusted personality. Techniques for managing stress, reducing anxiety, coping with anger, increasing assertiveness, and achieving self-control are considered. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 3301 Elementary Statistics.

            This course is a study of statistics as applied to problems in psychology and education, to include frequency functions, correlation and regression, and statistical tests of significance. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 3101 Statistics Laboratory.

            Laboratory to be taken concurrently with PSYC 3301. Credit 1.

          • PSYC 3331 Abnormal Psychology.

            This course includes an introduction to behavioral disorders. Biological and social factors in the development, diagnosis, and treatment of psychopathology are studied. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of Psychology. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 3332 History of Psychology.

            This course includes an historical survey of the scientific and philosophic antecedents of modern psychology. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of Psychology. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 3333 Physiological Psychology.

            This course is designed to acquaint the student with the biological substrates of behavior. A study is made of the genetic, neuroanatomical, neurochemical and neurophysiological mechanisms of such psychological processes as sensation, movement, learning, memory, motivation and emotion. This course is offered primarily for psychology majors and minors but may serve as an elective for majors in biology, chemistry, and public health. Laboratory period required. Prerequisite: 3 hours in Psychology and 4 hours in Biology or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 3133 Physiological Psychology Lab.

            Laboratory to be taken concurrently with PSYC 3333. Credit 1.

          • PSYC 3334 Human Sexuality.

            A study is made of the biological, social, emotional, cognitive, and spiritual elements of our human sexuality. Topics such as sexual health, sexual dysfunction, sexuality education, and intimate relationships are covered. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 3336 Sensation/Perception.

            A study is made of the sensory processes, the relationship between physical stimuli and sensory/perceptual experience, and perceptual phenomena. Topics such as pain, constancies, illusions, and psychophysics are covered. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 3337 Cognition.

            This course is intended to provide a broad survey of the field of cognitive psychology covering such topics as attention, memory, forgetting, consciousness, and organization/structure. It covers both the theoretical basis and empirical content of the area. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 3365 Close Relationships.

            This course examines the processes of close relationships, employing psychological theory and research. Topics include the nature of intimacy, attraction, communication, interdependency, love, jealousy, conflict, and loneliness.Credit 3.

          • PSYC 3371 Humanistic Psychology.

            An examination of the major themes of humanistic/existential psychology/philosophy and their impact on contemporary society. Works from literature, psychology, philosophy, and religion are included. Taught with PHL 371(PHIL 3371). Credit 3.

          • PSYC 3374 Developmental Psychology.

            A study is made of the physical, mental, emotional, and social growth and development of the person across the entire life span. Credit 3.

          • PSY 3375* Psychopathology and Family Dynamics

            This course examines the interactions of psychopathology and family dynamics. Topics include parenting, chronic physical illness, mood and anxiety disorders, physical and sexual abuse, and chemical dependence. Prerequisite: Junior standing and either PSY 331, FCS 369, SOC 462, or COM 486. Credit 3. *Subject to approval by the Coordinating Board.

          • PSYC 3381 Social Psychology.

            This course examines individual human behavior as it is influenced by cultural and social stimuli. Topics studied include interpersonal attraction, aggression, prejudice and sexism, conformity, altruism, and group behavior. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 3382 Comparative Psychology.

            This course deals with physical and behavioral differences in animals and how these differences can be adaptive. Specific topics include habitat selection, territoriality, predator and anti-predator behavior, reproductive behavior, and social behavior. Prerequisites: PSYC 2302 and 387. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 3383 Psychology and the Law.

            This course is designed to examine the application of scientific and professional principles of psychology in the legal system, the use of social science methods to study the legal system, and the impact of law on the practice of psychology. Content areas include legal competencies, the insanity defense, jury consultation, psychologists and the death penalty, the accuracy of eyewitness testimony, prediction of violence, the psychology of victims, family law, and ethical dilemmas. Prerequisites: 6 hours of PSYC. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 3385 Health Psychology.

            This course examines how biological, psychological, and social factors interact and contribute to health promotion, illness prevention, coping with stress, pain, or other acute or chronic diseases, and recovery from and adjustment to serious health problems. Prerequisites: 6 hours of PSYC. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 3391 Psychopharmacology.

            This course includes a study of the field of behavioral pharmacology: the systematic study of the effects of drugs on behavior and the way in which behavioral principles can help in understanding how drugs work. The course focuses on the neurophysiological mechanisms of action of various psychoactive drugs. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 4331 Personality.

            A study is made of the major theories of personality; the biological and social factors in the development and functioning of personality are considered. Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of Psychology. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 4332 Learning.

            This course includes a study of the major theories of learning and their historical backgrounds; experimental procedures in the study of learning are discussed. Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of Psychology. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 4333 Seminar in Psychology.

            This course includes discussions of selected topics in psychology. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 4334 Applied Social Psychology.

            This course examines the use of social psychological theory and method to explain and solve real world problems. Topics include physical and mental health, the environment, law, consumerism, and processes of conflict and social influence. Prerequisite: PSYC 3381. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 4375 Problems.

            Designed for advanced students in psychology who are capable of independent study. Prerequisites: Approval of Program Coordinator and the instructor directing the study. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 4388 Psychological Testing.

            [PSYC 4388] A study is made of group and individual differences and their assessment. The student is introduced to instruments and techniques used in the measurement of intelligence, aptitudes, achievement, interest, attitudes, and other dimensions of personality and behavior. Prerequisites: 9 hours in Psychology including PSY 131 PSYC 1301 and 387. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 4391 Divorce: The Psychological Impact.

            A comprehensive investigation is made of psychological, legal, moral, religious, and cultural variables related to cause, process, and adjustment to divorce is made. Emphasis is placed on the impact of divorce on the individual. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • PSYC 4392 Industrial/Organizational Psychology.

            This course provides an integration of psychological principles as applied to industrial/organizational milieu. The focus is on the application of research methodology, psychological assessment, personality, and organizational theories to the work environment. Specifically, research related to the application of psychological theory related to personnel, work environment, organizational, and pertinent legal issues will be considered. Prerequisite: PSYC 1301 or PSYC 2389. Credit 3.

          • 4393 Positive Psychology.

            This course will focus on the scientific understanding of healthy human processes of positive emotions, character strengths, traits, and virtues (such as courage, gratitude, hope, optimism, self-regulation, spirituality, and wisdom). Assessment methods and intervention applications in diverse settings (e.g., education, health, corporate and organizational leadership, and clinical psychology) will be covered. Prerequisite: 6 hours in Psychology. Credit: 3.


Reading Course Descriptions

          • READ 0301 Developmental Reading.

            An intense study of vocabulary, text organization, comprehension and other reading. Strategies to develop reading skills are emphasized. Instruction is delivered through a combination of class lectures and individual Reading Center tutorials. Credit in this course does not count toward graduation and computation of grade point averages and classification of students by hours completed.

          • READ 1301 Strategies for College Reading and Thinking.

            Students will learn and practice strategies and skills necessary to read and think critically at the college level. Course focus is on reading in all academic disciplines, especially those with heavy reading content. Two hour class and one hour computerized tutorial. Credit 3.

          • READ 2305 Literacy Processes of Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations.

            The fundamental concepts, principles, and conflicts of second language learning and teaching. Effective instructional approaches for students of diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds are learned and applied. The use of multiethnic literature in the classroom is a special focus of this course. Credit 3.

          • READ 2306 Literacy as a Foundation for Learning.

            Students examine their personal literacy development and their philosophical assumptions underlying literacy instruction in order to build a basis for the theories and practices provided in the advanced reading courses. Credit 3.

          • READ 2307 Literacy Across the Curriculum

          • READ 3370 The Teaching of Reading.

            The fundamental concepts and principles of reading instruction and focus on the developmental stages of reading. Word attack, comprehension, study strategies and other aspects of a balanced literacy program are learned and applied. Must be taken concurrently with READ 3371 and READ 3372. Concurrent enrollment in TESL 3101 is required for EC6 students. Field experiences in PK-12 public schools required. Advance departmental approval and BESL 3301 required. Admission to educator preparation program required. Credit 3.

          • READ 3371 Literacy Assessment and Instruction.

            Students will administer and interpret varied assessment tools as well as select and implement appropriate instructional techniques to plan and conduct effective classroom literacy instruction. Field experiences in PK-12 public schools required. Must be taken concurrently with READ 3370 and READ 3372. Concurrent enrollment in TESL 3101 is required for EC6 students. Advance departmental approval and BESL 3301 required. Admission to educator preparation program required. Credit 3.

          • READ 3373 Content Area Reading in the Middle Grades.

            This course focuses on using reading and writing as tools for learning in all academic areas, i.e. math, science, social studies, in grades 4-8.Concurrent enrollment in READ 3374. Prerequisite: SPED 2301. Credit 3.

          • READ 3374 Vocabulary and Word Study in the Middle Grades.

            Students will explore phonemic awareness, decoding skills, and vocabulary. Specifically included in the study are phonic generalizations, structural analysis, word derivations and etymology, and strategies for technical and other specialized vocabularies. Concurrent enrollment in READ 3373. Prerequisite: SPED 2301. Credit 3.

          • READ 3372 The Teaching of Language Arts.

            Focus on the developmental stages of writing and the interrelated language processes of listening, speaking and reading and writing. Pre-service teachers will explore theories and instructional practices in the elementary school language arts program. Must be taken concurrently with READ 3370 and READ 3371. Concurrent enrollment in TESL 3101 is required for EC6 students. Field experiences in PK-12 public schools required. Advance departmental approval and BESL 3301 required. Admission to educator preparation program required. Credit 3.

          • READ 3380 Emergent and Beginning Literacy.

            Language and cognitive development, listening, speaking, reading, and writing theories and instructional practices with children from birth to grade 3. Prerequisite: 54 hours. Credit 3.

          • READ 4205 Content Literacy Grades EC-6.

            This course focuses on using reading and writing as tools for learning in all academic areas, i.e. math, science, social studies in the elementary classroom. Pre-requisites: READ 3370, READ 3371, READ 3372. Concurrent enrollment in CIEE 4334, CIEE 4355, CIEE 4336, CIEE 4227, CIME 3375, and TESL 4101 is required.Credit: 2.

          • READ 4310 Reading and Language Arts in the Middle Grades.

            This course focuses on the uniqueness of middle grade students, middle school structures and explore literacy theories and activities that meet these needs and structures. Prerequisites: READ 3370, READ 3371, and READ 3372. Credit 3.

          • RDG 475 READ 4315 Individual Problems in Reading.

            Designed for students interested in extending conceptual knowledge in literacy issues. This course addresses special topics and independent study related to methodologies, curriculum, assessment, and language processes. Advance Departmental Approval Required. Credit 3.

          • READ 4320 Content Area Reading and Writing.

            Students will learn to determine pupils’ needs and abilities in content area reading and writing through the use of assessment instruments and will plan instructional strategies appropriate to their needs within specific secondary teaching fields. Field experiences in PK-12 public schools required. Prerequisites: CIEE 3374/CISE 3374. Credit 3.


Secondary Education

          • CISE 3383 Planning Instruction with Technology Integration.

          • CISE 3384 The Teaching Profession.

            This required course for those seeking 8-12 certification is an introduction to the concept of teaching as a professional career that makes a difference in the lives of children, youth, and their families. The course will introduce students to lesson planning, writing clear learning objectives, instructional strategies, formative and summative assessment methods, classroom management, professional ethics, the use of technology as an instructional tool, and the opportunity to teach lessons in the 8-12 classrooms. Ten (10) hours of field experience required in 8-12 public schools. Prerequisite: Junior Status. Credit 3.

          • CISE 4364 Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools.

             (A secondary block course) This course focuses on developing strategies that are effective in secondary schools. Candidates use the TEKS to develop objectives and plan effective instruction. Candidates develop a preliminary Teacher Work Sample to demonstrate their mastery of the components that produce effective instruction that results in effective student learning. Extensive field experience required. Prerequisites: CISE 3384, admission to the Educator Preparation Program and Departmental approval. This course is taken in block with CISE 4374 and CISE 4375, and CISE 4377. Credit 3.

          • CISE 4374 Human Growth and Learning.

            (A secondary block course) This course examines growth and learning in primarily in secondary environments. Major theories of teaching-learning processes are studied. Human development related to education is emphasized. Special attention is paid to diversity in the public school environment. Required field experience in 8-12 public schools. Prerequisites: CISE 3384*, admission to the Educator Preparation Program and Departmental approval. This course is taken in block with CISE 4364, CISE 4375, and CISE 4377. Credit 3.

          • CISE 4375 Problems.

            This course is designed to permit individual students to study specific areas of interest and need. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Credit 3.

          • CISE 4376 Developing a Professional Teacher Portfolio.

            The purpose of this course is to provide the prospective secondary teacher the opportunity to organize artifacts on the development, exploration, integration, application, and teaching of content knowledge, pedagogical knowledge and skill development in the development of a professional teacher portfolio. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in student teaching and departmental approval. Credit: 3.

          • CISE 4377 Assessment of Student Learning in Secondary.

            (A secondary block course) This course is designed to provide the prospective secondary teacher the opportunity to create educational objectives consistent with an aligned curriculum, instruction and assessment model. Student will learn how to construct and use teacher made tests and performance assessments that support the alignment process. Students will also study assessment, grading, portfolios, using cumulative folders, parent conferences, statistics and interpretations of standardized tests in the process of assessing of students. Extensive field experience required. Prerequisites: CISE 3384*, admission to the Educator Preparation Program and Departmental approval. This course is taken in block with CISE 4374, CISE 4375, and CISE 4364. Credit 3.

          • CISE 4378 Content Literacy.

          • CISE 4380 Responsibilities of the Professional Educator.

             This course is designed to assist future teachers in understanding the structure, organization, and management of public schools at the national, state, and local levels. Course content will include a study of the needs of the special learner and students from various cultures. This course is taken during the student teaching semester. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching. Credit 3.

          • CISE 4394 Creating an Environment for Learning in the Secondary Schools.

            (The Companion Course for Secondary and All-Level Student Teaching) This course provides a survey of classroom management and discipline approaches appropriate in a public school setting. Candidates will explore multiple components that produce a well managed classroom. Candidates will create a classroom management plan that will be a functional model for their classrooms. Prerequisites: Full admission to Educator Preparation Program and departmental approval.   This course is taken during the student teaching semester. Credit 3.

          • CISE 4396 Student Teaching in the Secondary Classroom.

            The student is assigned full-time student teaching responsibilities at the secondary level (Grades 8-12) for a placement of approximately six to seven weeks. This course must be taken with CISE 4397 or CIEE 4392. The two courses represent two placements that span the grades for that certification. For example, a teacher candidate with an 8-12 certification would have one placement at the lower grade levels such as 8th grade and a second placement at a higher grade, for example the 11th grade. This time is divided among observation, participation, teaching and conference activities. The candidate will create a Teacher Work Sample during this placement, a project that demonstrates mastery of the components that produce effective instruction that results in effective student learning. Successful completion of the Teacher Work Sample is required for program completion. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching Program. Credit 3.

          • CISE 4397 Student Teaching in the Secondary Classroom.

            The student is assigned full-time student teaching responsibilities at the secondary level (Grades 8-12) for a placement of approximately six to seven weeks. This course must be taken with CISE 4396. This time is divided among observation, participation, teaching and conference activities. Prerequisite: Admission to Student Teaching Program. Credit 3.


Sociology Course Descriptions

          • SOCI 1301 Principles of Sociology.

            Introduction to the discipline with a focus on concepts and principles used in the study of group life, social institutions and social processes. This course is a prerequisite to many other courses taught in the department. It is required of all Sociology majors and minors. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 1306 Social Problems.

            Application of sociological principles to the major problems of contemporary society. Special attention is given to mental disorders, use and abuse of drugs and alcohol, sexual deviance and crime and delinquency; problems of youth and the family in contemporary society; institutionalized aspects of inequality, prejudice and discrimination; and population and environmental concerns. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 2319 Introduction to Ethnic Studies.

            A survey of the field and problems of Ethnic Studies as an area of knowledge and investigation. The instruction is to be interdisciplinary in nature. Major considerations of the entire Ethnic Studies field will be defined and analyzed. Although the course is not prerequisite to any of the others, students are strongly urged to take it before attempting other Ethnic Studies courses. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 2366 Sociology of Sport.

            This course utilizes the application of the social science mode of inquiry to the study of the sociocultural characteristics of sport. These include examinations of the cultural, economic, political and structural factors (i.e., gender, race, etc.) which form salient aspects of today’s sport activities at various levels. Focus is placed on the characteristics of sports and how these characteristics both reflect and have impact upon the social climate of a given society. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 2399W Writing in Sociology.

             This course is designed to teach students the writing skills needed for advanced courses in Sociology. Topics include: structure and style in writing; citations and American Sociological Association stylebook; how to conduct library and internet research as a basis for research writing; and specialized techniques for quantitative research papers, qualitative research papers, book reviews, compare and contrast papers and essay exams. Prerequisite: ENGL 1301, ENGL 1302, SOCI 1301. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 3324 Social Inequality.

            This survey course studies the distribution of three primary resources: class, status and power. Special attention is given to the way birth-ascribed statuses such as age, sex and race interact with class, status and power stratification systems. Special attention is also given to the popular and scientific explanations of inequality, especially with respect to the high and low ends of the distribution of income and wealth. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 3325 Gender and Inequality.

            This course studies the influence of gender on socialization and placement in class, status and power stratification systems. It includes an analysis of institutional discrimination against women in major social institutions such as religion, education, family, heath care and work, and an examination of the feminization of poverty. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 3335 Race and Ethnic Inequality.

            This course examines ethnic stratification, i.e., placement in the class, status and power stratification systems on the basis of birth ascribed and socially defined race/ethnicity, and of the ideologies which serve to rationalize these inequalities. The course includes study of institutional discrimination -- ethnic stratification in major social institutions such as education, health care, religion and work. Broadly defined, ethnic stratification includes inequality based on other birth ascribed statuses, such as age and gender. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301.Credit 3

          • SOCI 3336 Social Change and Development.

            An analysis of world population growth and the associated problems of social development: urbanization, unemployment, secularization, hunger, and war. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 and upper division standing. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 3338 Socialization, Social Control and Deviant Social Behavior.

            Examines structures and processes through which social systems (e.g., groups, institutions, organizations, and societies) secure and maintain order and social control. Sociological concepts, principles and theories used to explain sanctioning in various social systems whereby people are socialized to want to act the way they have to act for social order to prevail. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 3341 Marriage and the Family.

            A sociological examination of marriage and family life. Problems of courtship, mate selection, and marriage adjustment in modern American society. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 3342 Sociology of Religion.

            Identity and comparative understanding of religious beliefs and practices of peoples of the world. Attention is given to particular archaeological and ethnographic problems in the study of religion. Special emphasis is given to the functional perspective in examining the relation between religious beliefs and other institutions in selective social systems. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 3354 Age and Inequality.

            This course underscores the influence of age on income and wealth, status and power. It includes an examination of institutional discrimination against the young and the old, as well as individual discrimination, such as child and elder abuse. It studies the relationship between life-cycle changes and changes in placement in the class, status and power stratification system. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 3355 Race/Ethnic Inequality.

            This course examines ethnic stratification, i.e., placement in the class, status and power stratification systems on the basis of birth ascribed and socially defined race/ethnicity, and of the ideologies which serve to rationalize these inequalities. The course includes the study of institutional discrimination and ethnic stratification in major social institutions such as education, health care, religion and work. Broadly defined, ethnic stratification includes inequality based on other birth ascribed statuses, such as age and gender. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 3365 Sociology of Health and Illness.

            Processes by which persons assume, act, and relinquish the sick role; interrelationships between patient and family, doctors, and hospital; quality and quantity of health services distributed by class and race. Problems posed by “mental illness”: diagnosis, treatment, and involuntary commitment. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 3376 Rural and Urban Sociology.

            Examines the human community in its ecological, cultural, and associational aspects. The folk, rural, and urban community considered from the standpoint of various sociological perspectives. Special attention is given to social change, including decision-making as it affects local life. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 3381 Cultural Anthropology.

            Cultural and social organization among primitive or preliterate societies; marriage, property, religion, magic and tribal control. Significance of the study of primitive cultures for understanding of urban industrial civilizations. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 3384 Economy and Society.

            Changing employment opportunities for college graduates; blue collar, white collar, and professional lifestyles; origins of industrial society and effects on social stratification, minorities, and the family. Issues such as workers’ control of industry, relationships between industry and government. Sociology of labor relations and personnel management. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 3392 Social Movements.

            Examines the characteristics of social movements useful to the sociological study and interpretations of major social trends involving both social and cultural change in community and society. Theoretical frameworks for understanding and the causes, types, and theories of change in contemporary society are given special attention. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 3443 Social Statistics.

            Examination of basic concepts, techniques and data necessary for an adequate understanding of social structure and change: observational, experimental, sample survey, and demographic. It includes an introduction to computers, computer software, and social statistics. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301. Credit 4

          • SOCI 4075 Readings in Sociology.

            Designed for advanced students in the behavioral sciences who are capable of independent study. Registration upon written approval of the chair of the department and of the instructor directing the course. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 4320 Science and Technology.

            This course examines the role of science and technology in society. Sociological approaches to understanding science and technology; the relationship between science, technology and other social institutions; and the impact on society will be examined. This seminar course will use a case study approach to the subject matter. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 and PHIL 3372. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 4332 The Sociology of Demography and Migration.

            This course introduces of the field of demography and explores theories and processes of population movement and migration. Special attention is given to effect of globalization on migration, migration streams, documented and undocumented migration, and assimilation of migrants.This course will focus on understanding the similarities and differences among immigrant groups who migrate with different social and human capital. The course also addresses immigration policies in the U. S. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 4334 Sociology of Disaster.

            Disasters are fundamentally social events. This course will investigate how culture, inequality, social structure and processes shape how people face disasters, how they respond and the ways in which they recover or fail to do so. How disasters may lead to rapid social change will also be explored. Students will learn the foundations of sociology of disaster theory, will examine a number of case studies and will apply theory to the in-depth study of one event. Writing enhanced. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 4336 Bureaucracy and Work.

            Examines the structure and functioning of large-scale organizations and bureaucratic social systems in various institutional settings (e.g., business or industry, health, education, religion, military, prison and political). Attention is given to personal and social consequences of organizational involvement. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 . Credit 3.

          • OCI 4337 Environment and Society.

            The purpose of this course is to examine the “environment” as a social and cultural issue. Topics discussed include an overview of the field of environmental sociology, traditional sociological perspectives on environmental issues, paradigmatic implications of environmental sociology, the development of environmental movement, the rise of environmental deterioration, public attitudes toward environmental issues, national environmental policies, and social impact assessment. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301 and upper division standing. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 4340 Research Methods in Sociology.

            This course is designed to introduce the student to the logic and character of scientific and alternative means of social inquiry. Examines the function of observation, concept formation, proposition arrangement and testing of theory as components of the scientific process in sociology. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 4344 Sociological Theory.

            A historical survey of the development of sociological thought. Emphasis is placed upon the growth of Sociology as a discipline, major areas of interest and major contributors. Prerequisite: SOCI 1301. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 4379 Internship in Applied Sociology.

            This course is designed to allow advanced students in-depth exploration of sociological issues in an applied setting. Minimum of 120 hours in approved host organization, plus completion of academic requirements. Prerequisites: Junior or Senior Sociology majors, minimum GPA 3.0 or through special petition. Internships are unpaid. Fall and Spring only. Credit 3.

          • SOCI 4399 Senior Seminar in Sociology.

            The content of this seminar will have alternate emphasis placed, at the discretion of the instructor, on special areas or issues of Sociology meeting the career needs of Sociology majors, minors, and/or prospective teachers of Sociology. Prerequisite: Advanced standing in Sociology. Credit 3.


Spanish Course Descriptions

          • SPAN 1411 Elementary Spanish I

            . For students who have had no previous instruction in Spanish. Introduction to Spanish pronunciation, vocabulary, and basic language codes stressing an oral approach to the language with special emphasis on conversation and oral drill. Two one-hour language laboratory periods weekly are required, one of which is a concurrent lab class enrollment. For non-native speakers of Spanish. Native Spanish speakers should take the CLEP or register for SPAN 2312. Credit 4.

          • SPAN 1412 Elementary Spanish II

            . This course is a continuation of SPN 1411. Language codes with more complexity are discussed and drilled. Stress is placed on aural and oral skills. Two one-hour language laboratory periods weekly are required, one of which is a concurrent lab class enrollment. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 1411 or equivalent. For non-native speakers of Spanish. Native Spanish speakers should take the CLEP or register for SPAN 2312. Credit 4.

          • SPAN 2311 Intermediate Spanish I

            . Readings of medium difficulty are used as a basis for reading and aural comprehension as well as for oral communication. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 1412 or equivalent. For non-native speakers of Spanish. Native Spanish speakers should take the CLEP or register for SPAN 2312. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 2312 Intermediate Spanish II.

            Continuation of SPAN 2311 with special emphasis on practical needs for communication. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 2311 or equivalent. A section may be reserved for native Spanish speakers. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 3361 Spanish Grammar and Composition.

            Study of the syntactical and morphological characteristics of the Spanish language with emphasis on developing the ability to write in Spanish. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 2312, the equivalent of SPAN 2312, or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 3362 Survey of Spanish Literature I.

            A study of the development of the literature of Spain from the Middle Ages to the 18th century. Various eras, genres, and authors are studied. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 3363 Survey of Spanish Literature II.

            Will focus on the literature of Spain beginning with the eighteenth century to the present. Masterworks from genres of drama, poetry, and prose will be read, discussed in Spanish and analyzed in written reports.Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 3367 Principles of Spanish Linguistics.

            A study of descriptive, applied, and contrastive linguistics. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 3368 Conversational Spanish I.

            Emphasis is placed on extemporaneous speaking and conversation. Reading materials from Spanish speaking countries will be included as a basis for conversation and composition. This course cannot be taken for credit by native Spanish speakers. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 3369 Conversational Spanish II.

            Emphasis is placed on extemporaneous speaking and conversation. Reading materials from Spanish speaking countries will be included as a basis for conversation and composition. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 3370 Spanish for Business.

            Study of business terminology in Spanish related to banking, accounting, international trade, marketing, management, and finance and of cultural aspects of Latin America and Spain, with practice in speaking, reading and translating business Spanish. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 3371 Spanish for Criminal Justice.

            Study of Spanish and Spanish-related issues and topics for Criminal Justice, criminology, law enforcement, and Sociology. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 3374 Introduction to The Literature of Spanish America.

            Study of the texts of Spanish-American writers from the Conquest to the present with emphasis given to the historical, cultural, and political factors which influenced their writing. Instruction is in Spanish. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 3375 Genres in Spanish-American Literature.

            Studies of themes and techniques of outstanding Spanish- American poets, dramatists or novelists. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 3380 Spanish Culture and Civilization.

            An overview of the culture and civilization of Spain. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 3381 Spanish Literature for Children.
          • SPAN 3385 Spanish-American Culture and Civilization.

            A study of the culture and civilization of the Spanish-speaking areas of the Americas. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 4360 Don Quijote.

            Analysis of the counter-reformation masterpiece by Miguel de Cervantes, with special attention to the author’s experimentation with various literary genres of his epoch to create the ‘first modern novel.”Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 4361 Advanced Spanish Grammar and Composition.

            An in-depth study of the usage of the Spanish language as it relates to creative writing and scholarly reports. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 4362 History of the Spanish Language.

            This course outlines the history of the Spanish language over the last two millennia, focusing on the formal development of its phonology, morphology, syntax and semantics. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 4364 Spanish-American Prose

            . A study of selected authors, short stories, essays, or novels. Emphasis on themes, techniques, and current literary themes. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 4365 Pablo Picasso and Spanish Art.

            This course examines the interplay between Spanish culture and Spanish art using Pablo Picasso as a central unifying figure in order to relate past, present and future aspects of Spanish heritage. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 4366 Spanish Phonetics.

            This course is an introduction to the scientific study of the sounds of Spanish. The two essential goals of the course are to discuss the ways in which English and Spanish sounds differ, and to help improve pronunciation of the Spanish language. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 4370 Seminar in Selected Topics in Literature, Language, or Civilization

            . An in-depth study of a selected topic. The topic to be explored will change from year to year. This course may be repeated for credit as the content varies. Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPAN 4375 Individual Readings in Spanish

            . Designed for the individual student who may need to study a particular era, genre, or author. Enrollment in this course is restricted and must be granted by department chair Prerequisite: Grade of C or better in SPAN 3361 or consent of Chair. Credit 3.


Special Education Course Descriptions

          • SPED 2301 Introduction to Special Education.

            This survey course presents case studies of students with special needs, historical perspectives of special education, recommended educational approaches, and current models and issues in special education. Field experiences in PK-12 public schools and various appropriate field placements required. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Credit 3.

          • SPED 3302 A Study of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders.

            This course provides a study of the defining characteristics, systems of assessment and classification, theories of causality, and interventions for students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders. Prerequisites: SPED 2301 and 45 hours and SPED 2301. Credit 3.

          • SPED 3301 Learning and Instruction for Young Children with Disabilities.

            This course provides opportunities for students to demonstrate competencies by working with young children with disabilities under the supervision of a qualified teacher. This course provides experiences in designing individual instructional plans, assistive technology, data collection, and instructional adaptations. Field experiences in PK-12 public schools required. Prerequisite: SPED 2301 and Junior standing. Prerequisite: 45 hours and SPED 2301. Credit 3.

          • SPED 3303 Behavioral Intervention and Family Involvement in Special Education.

            This course addresses a variety of instructional techniques that can be utilized to change, maintain, increase, or decrease individual and group behaviors. Proactive behavioral intervention techniques from a variety of theoretical models are examined. Behavioral change strategies emphasize functional assessment principles, positive behavioral supports, and self-management. The basic principles, tools, and techniques of communicating with parents of children with disabilities and implementing parent education programs also are addressed. Prerequisites: SPED 2301. Credit 3.

          • SPED 3304 A Study of Learning and Learning Disabilities.

            Learning disabilities are examined with a focus on history, definition, causation, teaching methods and inclusive practices. Emphasis is placed on the appropriate selection of assessment and teaching strategies, lesson planning, and use of technology for students with special needs. Prerequisites: 45 hours and SPED 2301. Credit 3.

          • SPED 3305 Diagnostic Assessment in Special Education.

            An overview of formal and informal assessment for special education is provided. This course includes basic concepts of measurement, assessment of academic achievement, screening tools, diagnostic testing, review of individual and group intelligence tests, perceptual skills, sensory acuity and adaptive behavior. Prerequisites: SPED 2301, SPED 3302, and SPED 3304. Credit 3.

          • SPED 3306 Behavioral Principles.

            This course examines basic behavioral principles including reinforcement, punishment, stimulus control, and measurement of behavior. Specific procedures are presented for establishing new behavior, increasing desirable behavior, and decreasing undesirable behavior for individuals with disabilities. Ethical considerations also are addressed. Prerequisite: 45 hours. Credit 3.

          • SPED 3307 Behavioral Assessment, Intervention and Evaluation.

            This course provides the interventionist with the techniques for designing, implementing, and evaluating behavioral interventions appropriate for individuals with Autism and related disabilities. Ethics of behavioral interventions will also be discussed. Prerequisite 45 hours and SPED 33202. Credit 3.

          • SPED 3308 Behavioral Intervention and Research Methods.

            All of the elements of single-subject research design are examined, providing practical information for assessing, designing, implementing, and evaluating behavior analytic techniques and curriculum for educating children with autism and related disorders. Ethics for practicing Behavior Analysts will also be examined. Prerequisite: 45 hours and SPED 3302. Credit 3.

          • SPED 4301 Study of Cognitive and Low Incidence Disabilities.

            This course includes a study of the characteristics and needs of students with mental retardation and low incidence disabilities. Topics include appropriate curriculum methods and instructional needs for all ages, life span issues, vocational, and transition issues. Twenty (20) hours of field placement required. This course must be taken concurrently with SPED 4302. Prerequisites: SPED 2301, SPED 3302, and SPED 3304. Credit 3.

          • SPED 4303 Individual Problems in Special Education.

            Designed to permit individual students to study specific areas of interest and need. Prerequisite: Approval of Department Chair. Credit 3.

          • SPED 4302 Collaborative Partnerships Across the Lifespan.

            This course is designed to equip the prospective teacher with the collaborative skills needed in inclusive school and community environments. Areas that are emphasized include adaptations for instruction, transition planning, vocational/career education, and assistive technology. Twenty (20) hours of field placement required. This course must be taken concurrently with SPED 4301. Prerequisites: SPED 3301, SPED 3302, and SPED 3304. Credit 3.

          • SPED 4305 Student Teaching in Special Education*

            The candidate is assigned a student teaching placement in a special education classroom for a period of 7 weeks. This time is divided among classroom assistance, instructional planning, classroom and individual instruction, and conference activities. The candidate will create a Teacher Work Sample during this placement, a project demonstrating master of the components of effective instruction and student learning. Successful completion of the Teacher Work Sample is required for program completion. SPED 4305 must be taken with CIEE 4391 and other courses required during the student teaching semester. Prerequisite: Senior status and admission to Student Teaching. Credit 3.


Theatre Course Descriptions

          • THEA 1114 Theatre Workshop.

            One semester hour of credit may be received per semester for work done in this practical workshop consisting of actual work on productions. Required of theatre and musical theatre majors. May be repeated for credit. Credit 1.

          • THEA 1115 Tech Build Crew.

          • THEA 1116 Costume Crew.

          • THEA 1117 Management Crew.

          • THEA 1330 Introduction to Production.

            Introduction to theatrical production. An overview of the elements of production to include an introduction to the basic components of theatre technology, stage scenery, stage lighting, theatrical costuming, stage management, theatre management, and script analysis. This course is designed to introduce the student to all areas of theatrical production. Credit 3.

          • THEA 1331 Technical Production.

            Introduction to theatre technology. A focus on the techniques and methods in set construction, lighting and sound technology, property construction, and theatrical production techniques. Credit 3.

          • THEA 1332 Technical Theatre: Stage Costuming.

            [DRAM 1342] A study of the basic techniques of costuming, sewing, dyeing, and distressing fabrics. Credit 3.

          • THEA 1364 Acting I.

            [DRAM 1351] A study of basic techniques in body, voice, characterization, and play analysis as they are applied to the performance of stage tasks by the actor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 1366 Theatre Appreciation.

            [DRAM 1310] An analysis of the theatrical experience for the audience. Examination of theatre’s relation to the broad contemporary scene and its relation to past eras. Examination of the production elements necessary to provide the theatrical experience. Credit 3.

          • THEA 2330 Stage Make-Up.

            [DRAM 1341] A survey of the reasons for stage make-up and the types of make-up available. Principles of designing make-up for characters in a play. Intensive practical application. Credit 3.

          • THEA 2336 Theatre Speech I.

            [DRAM 2336] Beginning training in the release of the voice for effective communication. Work on breathing, projection, placement, articulation, resonance, and quality. Credit 3.

          • THEA 2337 Theatre Speech II.

            Advanced training in application of appropriate vocal techniques to produce optimum control of quality, projection, and precision in diction. Ultimately the application is in fusing technique with the actor’s interpretation of roles. Prerequisites: COM 162 or THR 231, 164, or consent of the instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 2360 Beginning Design.

            Introduction to the methods, concepts and materials of designing for theatre, including the basic element s of set design, properties design, lighting design, and sound design for the stage. Students will be introduced to the methods of developing a design from script analysis to presentation of the completed design. Prerequisites: THEA 1331 or permission of instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 2361 Computer Drafting for Theatre.

            Introduction to computer aided drafting and design for theatrical applications. Practical approach to computer drafting of floor plans, elevations, sections, light plots, and organizational diagrams using popular CAD software developed specifically for theatrical applications as well as programs like AutoCAD and Project Manager. Prerequisites: THEA 1331 or permission of instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 2367 Text Analysis for the Theatre.

          • THEA 2368 Acting II.

            A concentration on the techniques of freeing the body, body language, and movement in the development of characterization and actor technique. Prerequisite: THEA 1364 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • THR 314 A Theatre Workshop.

            One semester hour of credit may be received per semester for work done in this practical workshop consisting of actual work on productions. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. May be repeated for credit. Credit 1.

          • THR 314 B Theatre Workshop.

            Rehearsal and performance in minor roles. May be repeated for credit. Credit 1.

          • THR 314 C Theatre Workshop.

            Scene work in directing class. May be repeated for credit. Credit 1.

          • THR 317A Musical Theatre Workshop.

            Junior and Senior levels to synthesize musical theatre majors’ work in music, theatre and dance. May be repeated for credit. Credit 1.

          • THR 317B Musical Theatre Workshop.

            Freshmen and sophomore levels, to synthesize musical theatre majors’ work in music, theatre, and dance. May be repeated for credit. Credit 1.

          • THEA 3115 Advanced Tech Build Crew.

          • THEA 3116 Advanced Costume Crew.

          • THEA 3127 Advanced Theatre Management Crew.

          • THEA 3331 Advanced Stage Makeup.

            Investigation of and experimentation with three-dimensional makeup constructions to provide drastic alteration of the actor’s face for stage, film, and television. Prerequisite: THEA 2330 or consent of the instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 3336 Scenography IV: Intermediate Scenery and Property Design.

            Investigation and experimentation with three dimensional spatial concepts and the interaction of the performer with the performance space. Designing for the performer and the action of the play with the practical development of spaces, furniture, and props for the stage. Prerequisites: THEA 2360 and THEA 2361. Credit 3.

          • THEA 3334 Stage Costume Design.

            A survey of historical costume; contrast of general clothing with stage costume; and consideration of all elements involved in designing costumes for an entire production. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Credit 3.

          • THEA 3335 Costume Construction.

            Pattern drafting and construction techniques for period costumes. Projects may include bodices, skirts, corsets, panniers, bustles, crinolines, and 18th and 19th century men’s coats. Prerequisites: THEA 3334 or THEA 337 or consent of the instructor. Credit 3.

          • THR 337 History of Costume.

            A survey of historical costumes and accessories by periods from ancient Egypt to the present day; contrast of general clothing with stage costumes. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 3360 History of the Theatre I.

            A survey of the origins of the theatre, with major concentration centered upon the development of the western theatre from the Greeks to the Neoclassic. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

          • THEA 3362 Lighting and Sound Design.

          • THEA 3365 Stage and Theatre Management.

            Advanced study of theatre management with an emphasis on the organizational, technical and management responsibilities of a stage manager as well as the public relations and marketing skills needed to run a house and box office. Included will be a focus on the establishment of a collaborative atmosphere within a production team or within a theatre company.

          • THEA 3369 Acting III.

            Detailed study of action and characterization through scene study, research, and self-use, utilizing interior and exterior methods to develop a working method for each actor. Prerequisite: THEA 1364, THEA 2368 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 3370 Acting IV.

            Advanced scene study with concentration on textual analysis, structure, diction, and rhythm of the script. Prerequisite: 9 hours of acting courses or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 3372 Improvisational Techniques.

            This course is designed to develop students’ use of improvisations, games, and ritual to enhance creative thinking, problem solving skills, characterization, and trust within the rehearsal process. Prerequisite: THEA 1364 or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 3373 Stage Movement for Actors.

          • THEA 3395 Acting in Major Roles.

            This course allows credit for performing a major role in Theatre Program productions, involving research, rehearsal and performance during the nine-month academic year. May be repeated for credit. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4093 Theatre Internship.

          • THEA 4330 Advanced Scenery, Lighting and Sound Design.

            Advanced design. Students will be involved in creating scenic, lighting, and sound design projects. The course will include extensive sketching, rendering, computer drafting, and model building. Prerequisites: THEA 1360, junior standing or consent of the instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4331 Acting for the Camera.

            An intensive and practical study of the special techniques of acting for film and television with the goal of work in those industries; extensive scene work in front of the camera. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4332 Auditioning for the Commercial Theatre.

            The preparation of audition materials which suit the variety of demands in the commercial world of theatre, musical theatre, cinema, and television. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4333 Period Acting Styles.

            Acting styles, manners, customs, and movement characteristics of Greek, Elizabethan, Jacobean and Restoration periods as well as twentieth century nonrealistic play styles will be studied through acting scenes from plays of those times. Prerequisite: THEA 1364. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4360 History of the Theatre II.

            A Survey of changing styles in theatre, from the Romantic revolution through the Realistic movement to the innovations of the twentieth century theatre. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4361 Stage Lighting.

            The study of lighting design as an art; the history of stage lighting and a study of contemporary stage lighting techniques, practices, and equipment. Students will design lighting for a show of their own choosing. Prerequisite: THR 161 THEA 1331and basic computer literacy or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4362 Playwriting.

            A study of the elements of playwriting through writing exercises designed to enhance the understanding of structure, style, character and dialogue. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: junior standing or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 3363.

          • THEA 4365 Portfolio Development.

            Students will develop individualized projects in scenery, costume, lighting, sound, or technical production. Prerequisite: two of the following design courses: THEA 3334, THEA 4330, or THEA 4361; consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4366 Directing I.

          • THEA 4367 Directing II.

          • THR 468 Experimental Theatre Production.

            Analysis of plays that depart from the realistic genre and examination of new production possibilities arising out of developments in theatre technology that will complement the experiments of the playwrights. Application of theory in laboratory productions. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4369 Dialects and Accents for the Theatre.

            Emphasis is placed upon the regional dialects of Great Britain and upon the accents which characterize English as spoken by the natives of the various European countries. Intensive practical application in rehearsing appropriate scenes from plays. Prerequisite: THEA 1364 or consent of the instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4371 The American Musical Theatre.

            The history of the development of musical theatre (excluding opera) in America. Emphasis is placed on written student criticism and evaluation of musical theatre. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4376 Scene Painting.

          • THR 487 Workshop in Creative Dramatics.

            Fundamental theories and elements of creative drama, with emphasis in developing and guiding creative drama activities such as storytelling, improvisation, rhythmic and interpretative movement, puppetry, theatre in education techniques and pantomime. The course is designed for prospective teachers grades K-12. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4389 Repertory Theatre.

            A unified approach to theatre, contrasted with the compartmentalized division of labor used more frequently, allowing the self-contained group to do all of the production work as well as the acting. May be repeated for credit. Offered in summer terms. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4392 Undergraduate Seminar in Drama.

            A course for the undergraduate student which will allow a student to pursue particular areas beyond the limits of current course offerings. The particular study, however, will be within the student’s areas of specialization. Prerequisite: permission of the Program Coordinator. May be repeated for credit. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4362 Playwriting.

            A study of the elements of playwriting through writing exercises designed to enhance the understanding of structure, style, character and dialogue. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: junior standing or consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4363 Dramatic Theory and Criticism.

            A study of the principles of various styles and periods of dramaturgy, involving a history of criticism from Aristotle to the present. Representative plays will be analyzed for theme, structure, characterization and dialogue with a view to their influences on contemporary theatre. Emphasis is placed on written student criticism and evaluation of plays. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4365 Portfolio Development.

            Students will develop individualized projects in scenery, costume, lighting, sound, or technical production. Prerequisite: two of the following design courses: THEA 3334, THEA 4330, or THEA 4361; consent of instructor. Credit 3.

          • THR 466, 467 Play Directing.

            Basic director preparation in script analysis, communication skills, creating ground plans and scene study through a wide variety of theatrical styles and direction of scenes. Writing Enhanced. Prerequisite: junior standing. Credit 3 each.

          • THR 468 Experimental Theatre Production.

            Analysis of plays that depart from the realistic genre and examination of new production possibilities arising out of developments in theatre technology that will complement the experiments of the playwrights. Application of theory in laboratory productions. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4369 Dialects and Accents for the Theatre.

            Emphasis is placed upon the regional dialects of Great Britain and upon the accents which characterize English as spoken by the natives of the various European countries. Intensive practical application in rehearsing appropriate scenes from plays. Prerequisite: THEA 1364 or consent of the instructor. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4371 The American Musical Theatre.

            The history of the development of musical theatre (excluding opera) in America. Emphasis is placed on written student criticism and evaluation of musical theatre. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4375 Scene Painting.

            Hands-on projects develop technical information in creating illusionistic environments for theatrical productions. Credit 3.

          • THR 487 Workshop in Creative Dramatics.

            Fundamental theories and elements of creative drama, with emphasis in developing and guiding creative drama activities such as storytelling, improvisation, rhythmic and interpretative movement, puppetry, theatre in education techniques and pantomime. The course is designed for prospective teachers grades K-12. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4389 Repertory Theatre.

            A unified approach to theatre, contrasted with the compartmentalized division of labor used more frequently, allowing the self-contained group to do all of the production work as well as the acting. May be repeated for credit. Offered in summer terms. Credit 3.

          • THEA 4392 Undergraduate Seminar in Drama.

            A course for the undergraduate student which will allow a student to pursue particular areas beyond the limits of current course offerings. The particular study, however, will be within the student’s areas of specialization. Prerequisite: permission of the Program Coordinator. May be repeated for credit. Credit 3.


University-Wide Course Descriptions

          • UNIV 1301 Introduction to Collegiate Studies.

            UNIV 1301 is a seminar designed to enhance the first-year experience for beginning college students and to increase student success in college. The varied content of the course will facilitate a smoother transition into the college culture. Content areas include: goal setting and time management skills, writing skills, test preparation and taking skills, critical thinking skills, major and career exploration, locating and utilizing campus resources, diversity awareness, wellness strategies, money management, and leadership/civic service awareness. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.

          • UNIV 4301 University Studies Capstone Project.

            Students will conduct career exploration activities as well as complete a capstone project linking the three minor areas of study that comprise the student's personalized Bachelor of General Studies degree. Students will have research, review, and analyze the three academic minor areas and meld them into an innovative research report. Prerequisite: Senior standing and academic good standing. Writing Enhanced. Credit 3.



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